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Making use of the router's 5GHz band


dvn
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How are you making use of your router's 5GHz band. Can you tell me what devices you are personally using with 5GHz. And maybe why, and what difference you see? I'm asking you to share your first-hand experience with devices on 5GHz.

 

I have a dual-band Netgear WNDR3700, so I'm wondering how I can make use of it. Or if I should even bother.

 

*This is a question from another thread I had recently started. I broke up that thread because the question about wireless isolation deserves its own.

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How are you making use of your router's 5GHz band. Can you tell me what devices you are personally using with 5GHz. And maybe why, and what difference you see? I'm asking you to share your first-hand experience with devices on 5GHz.

 

I have a dual-band Netgear WNDR3700, so I'm wondering how I can make use of it. Or if I should even bother.

 

*This is a question from another thread I had recently started. I broke up that thread because the question about wireless isolation deserves its own.

 

dvn,

 

I use a WNDR3800 and I use the 5ghz band for wireless connectivity to my MacBook Pro. I also have been using it for wireless HD streaming. I chose to use this band because it is less congested and sometimes offers me greater speeds but within shorter distances. I should have responded to your previous post. Sorry! We can continue this discussion in email if you like? You have my address. I have setup multi-thousand dollar CISCO wireless networks within our organization and I know something about them.

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Ahem. That's what a forum is for. Share your knowledge!

 

5Ghz = Faster

5Ghz = Less range

 

Totally worth it to run dual bands IMO. Great for living room laptop access while keeping the kids on 2.4. iPads can connect to 5.8 though. That's kinda nice.

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Ahem. That's what a forum is for. Share your knowledge!

 

5Ghz = Faster

5Ghz = Less range

 

Totally worth it to run dual bands IMO. Great for living room laptop access while keeping the kids on 2.4. iPads can connect to 5.8 though. That's kinda nice.

 

That is what I was thinking?

 

I use my 5 GHz band for trying to stream video but it isn't up to the task so I use it for regular connections now.

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Ahem. That's what a forum is for. Share your knowledge!

 

5Ghz = Faster

5Ghz = Less range

 

Totally worth it to run dual bands IMO. Great for living room laptop access while keeping the kids on 2.4. iPads can connect to 5.8 though. That's kinda nice.

 

I've done a lot of work with wireless.

 

I did want to clarify that 5GHZ is not really faster than 2.4GHZ. 802.11a and 802.11g both have a maximum over-the-air rate of 54 Mb/s. The same is true with 2.4GHZ and 5GHZ bands of the 802.11n spec, except the spec allows for a maximum speed of 600MHZ (not that you'll ever seen that in real life).

 

5GHZ can have a faster effective rate in some situations. This is usually because there is a lot of interference in the 2.4GHZ band in the specific location, but not much in the 5GHZ band. However, this is often not true in business & industrial areas because many companies are using 5GHZ for backhaul links.

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I use my 5 GHz band for trying to stream video but it isn't up to the task so I use it for regular connections now.

In your case, did it fail because of distance limitations, or was it something else, like interference?

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That's a great term, backhaul links. What is it?

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I777 using Tapatalk 2

 

backhaul links are ones that are used to link a remote site back to the mothership; for example, a regional office of a company to its headquarters.

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I'd say, don't overthink it. Your router offers simultaneous dual-band. With my Cisco unit that seems very similar, you can setup networks on both bands using the same SSID and passkey. For your 2.4GHz only devices, they'll simply jump on that band. For your dual-capable devices, they'll split across both. The router should be able to manage the routing of specific packets across specific bands. Normal internet applications, file server, etc. usually work over a 2.4GHz network just fine even with some interference, and then streaming media can be routed over the 5GHz band with less interference. Pushing streaming packets across 5GHz is supposed to help minimize the studder, but there are a lot of factors at play, and your wireless router is only one of them.

 

Most routers today also support Auto channel selecting, and I say use it. I think my neighbor tinkers with his wirless router because I will briefly experience situations where my network SSID get's really sporadic. I simple reboot of the router, a new channel, and my problem seems to be solved.

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