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Don W

Synology vs. Drobo vs. WD

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Don W

I have decided I would like to get a NAS but everytime I decide on one, I read some review and am not sure if I want it. Here is some qualities I would like.

 

1. To be able to put in any size HD and it be added to the pool

 

2. Parity fault tolerance - IE raid 5

 

3. If the NAS dies, to be able to pull out the drive and put into a PC and be able to retrieve the data (I read that Drobo has it's own version of Raid and that you have to get another Drobo to recover the data)

 

4. To be able to put any HD into the NAS. I read that the WD DX400 is s only compatible three different with enterprise level HD's and that they are very expensive.

 

Does anyone have a good suggestion for my next purchase???

 

TIA

 

Don

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jcollison

Yep. Drobo is out with requirement #3 and you would be able to recover your data with another Drobo. John Z has the WD box and I bet he will answer that question.

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osquest

Synology is out with your combined requirements. Synology Hybrid Raid will give you #1 but not #3. It's basically the same as Drobo.

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ikon

Frankly, in many ways, the most reliable NAS is an old PC with a RAID card, and a good backup plan. But, it's not the most versatile; it doesn't have the cool apps that devices like Synology have.

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Server Grunt

Hi,

 

The reason that the Synology, Drobo and others can fulfill 1,2 & 4, but fail on 3 is that they use what is called "Abstracted RAID" and it is possible that W8 will use a form of this as well.

 

With "Abstracted" the meaning is that instead of using physical disks as the building blocks of an array, this arrangement employs virtual volumes (in Windows environment these are called "virtual disks"),.

With Virtual volumes the user get flexibility to configure the volume to take up only part of a disk, or expand across multiple disks.

 

For example you could have a virtual volume that consumes all of one 500GB disk and half of a 1TB disk. You would then have a second virtual volume that uses the remaining 500GB on the 1TB drive. The RAID software manages them behind the scenes, and they appear as a single storage unit to the user, if so desired.

 

This is why Abstracted RAID allows the mix of different-capacity drives and varying levels of fault tolerance, as well as the ability to expand capacity automatically without user intervention. Without it, changing RAID levels involves backing up all the data, reconfiguring, and then copying the data back--a time-consuming and sometimes technically challenging activity.

 

Thus, when removing the HDD from the software managed raid, the volume will not logically be complete, so to say, resulting in the information to re-create the data being lost, resulting in the failure to meet criteria 3.

 

 

/Grunt

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yodafett

I believe the answer to your question is actually WHSv1. You get the drive pooling with the ability to put it in a pc to read in case of failure.

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