Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)

SSD owners! Want to test Home Server SMART code to verify correct results for your SSD?


msawyer91
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am getting ready to release the next beta of Home Server SMART 2012, and I need your help. As many of you are well aware, the beta 2.2.1.21 (and earlier) does not correctly report SMART results for Solid State Disks (SSDs). This is because, before a few weeks ago, I never even considered SSDs or the fact they would report completely different data.

 

I managed to acquire some SSDs, but much to my dismay I found there are many different controller manufacturers and they all have their own sets of attributes. And when OCZ acquired Indilinx last year and came out with the new Indilinx Everest controllers, they changed the attributes, so some vendors have multiple sets!

 

The long and short of it is that I cannot afford to buy SSDs from all these companies, which is necessary to ensure complete coverage of the various controller manufacturers. Intel, Indilinx, SandForce, Micron, JMicron, Stec and others...there are a lot of different attribute sets out there!

 

OCZ, for instance, has SandForce and Indilinx Everest controllers; Crucial seems to favor Micron and Intel uses, well, Intel.

 

That said, is there anybody here in on Home Server Show who would be willing to run Home Server SMART code to examine their SSD and report back to me? Basically I want to make sure that I 1) correctly determine the controller manufacturer and therefore 2) display the correct set of attributes in the UI.

 

You don't even need to be running an SSD in your home server. If you have an SSD in any computer at all, you can test. Here's how!

 

If you are running a home server with WHS 2011 (or SBS 2011 Essentials/Storage Server 2008 R2 Essentials) and there's an SSD in it, you can use the Home Server SMART 2012 beta code that I hope to have available in the next week.

 

If you don't have an SSD in your server BUT you've got one in a desktop or laptop, I've created a Windows Forms-based UI that contains much of the Home Server SMART 2012 code, but can be run in 64-bit editions of Windows Vista and Windows 7. This "WindowSMART" application was built mainly for me to use as a means of testing code on the development PC before pushing it onto my home servers, but anybody can run it.

 

Ideally, at a bare minimum, I would at least like to ensure I get coverage of the most common/popular consumer class SSDs. Right now, that seems to be OCZ, Intel, Crucial, Patriot Memory, Kingston, Corsair and SanDisk. Sure, the goal is actually to ensure I properly cover the controllers -- for instance, I have an OCZ Agility3 and an OCZ Octane -- the former uses a SandForce controller; the latter, an Indilinx Everest. That's all I am able to test and validate, leaving all the other controllers out there untested by me. And that leads to bad software. So if anyone is willing to volunteer to run either the HSS 2012 beta or the WindowSMART test UI, your help will be greatly appreciated--and hopefully should require very, very little of your time. Mostly you would just need to run the tool, take screen caps and email them back to me.

 

If anyone is willing to volunteer, please let me know!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am getting ready to release the next beta of Home Server SMART 2012, and I need your help. As many of you are well aware, the beta 2.2.1.21 (and earlier) does not correctly report SMART results for Solid State Disks (SSDs). This is because, before a few weeks ago, I never even considered SSDs or the fact they would report completely different data.

 

I managed to acquire some SSDs, but much to my dismay I found there are many different controller manufacturers and they all have their own sets of attributes. And when OCZ acquired Indilinx last year and came out with the new Indilinx Everest controllers, they changed the attributes, so some vendors have multiple sets!

 

The long and short of it is that I cannot afford to buy SSDs from all these companies, which is necessary to ensure complete coverage of the various controller manufacturers. Intel, Indilinx, SandForce, Micron, JMicron, Stec and others...there are a lot of different attribute sets out there!

 

OCZ, for instance, has SandForce and Indilinx Everest controllers; Crucial seems to favor Micron and Intel uses, well, Intel.

 

That said, is there anybody here in on Home Server Show who would be willing to run Home Server SMART code to examine their SSD and report back to me? Basically I want to make sure that I 1) correctly determine the controller manufacturer and therefore 2) display the correct set of attributes in the UI.

 

You don't even need to be running an SSD in your home server. If you have an SSD in any computer at all, you can test. Here's how!

 

If you are running a home server with WHS 2011 (or SBS 2011 Essentials/Storage Server 2008 R2 Essentials) and there's an SSD in it, you can use the Home Server SMART 2012 beta code that I hope to have available in the next week.

 

If you don't have an SSD in your server BUT you've got one in a desktop or laptop, I've created a Windows Forms-based UI that contains much of the Home Server SMART 2012 code, but can be run in 64-bit editions of Windows Vista and Windows 7. This "WindowSMART" application was built mainly for me to use as a means of testing code on the development PC before pushing it onto my home servers, but anybody can run it.

 

Ideally, at a bare minimum, I would at least like to ensure I get coverage of the most common/popular consumer class SSDs. Right now, that seems to be OCZ, Intel, Crucial, Patriot Memory, Kingston, Corsair and SanDisk. Sure, the goal is actually to ensure I properly cover the controllers -- for instance, I have an OCZ Agility3 and an OCZ Octane -- the former uses a SandForce controller; the latter, an Indilinx Everest. That's all I am able to test and validate, leaving all the other controllers out there untested by me. And that leads to bad software. So if anyone is willing to volunteer to run either the HSS 2012 beta or the WindowSMART test UI, your help will be greatly appreciated--and hopefully should require very, very little of your time. Mostly you would just need to run the tool, take screen caps and email them back to me.

 

If anyone is willing to volunteer, please let me know!

 

I have SSD's in my servers as well as on every desktop (13 total). I would be willing to test it on a couple of test systems which are Windows 7 systems. I only have access to certain drives on my test systems so could test the Vertex 2, Vertex 1 (Indilinx), the Crucial M4, and the Agility 2/3. I do not have any Intel drives and the Force 3 and Vertex 3 MI are on my production system and I am not ready for that yet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have SSD's in my servers as well as on every desktop (13 total). I would be willing to test it on a couple of test systems which are Windows 7 systems. I only have access to certain drives on my test systems so could test the Vertex 2, Vertex 1 (Indilinx), the Crucial M4, and the Agility 2/3. I do not have any Intel drives and the Force 3 and Vertex 3 MI are on my production system and I am not ready for that yet.

Not a problem. Any testing at all will be helpful, thank you. :) Please shoot me a PM or send an email to the bug tracking email (bugXtraq *AT* dojoXnorthXsoftware (DOT) net). Remove the capital X's from the email address -- sorry about that, but I don't see any way in the forum to obfuscate the email address from spammers.

 

My plan is to, hopefully later this week, to send out an email to all testers with links to download the beta and optionally the SmartInspect redistributable. This next beta will take away a lot of the logging to the Windows log (many users complained about HSS constantly writing out every little message) and instead writes it to more robust SmartInspect log files. If there are items that I can't seem to resolve from swapping screen captures, then I would ask for the SIL log files. I provide the link to download the SmartInspect redistributable to folks are able to see what exactly is contained in the logs. I don't believe in asking anyone to send something to me without them having an opportunity to know exactly what it is they are sending.

 

Matt

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have SSD's in my servers as well as on every desktop (13 total). I would be willing to test it on a couple of test systems which are Windows 7 systems. I only have access to certain drives on my test systems so could test the Vertex 2, Vertex 1 (Indilinx), the Crucial M4, and the Agility 2/3. I do not have any Intel drives and the Force 3 and Vertex 3 MI are on my production system and I am not ready for that yet.

Hi pcdoc,

 

I sent out an email to other testers just a few minutes ago. For the sake of simplicity I'm pasting the email below, which contains information, download links, etc. Links to both the latest beta of Home Server SMART 2012 and the client application, WindowSMART 2012, are included. Currently WindowSMART is only available for 64-bit versions of Windows Vista, 7, Server 2008 and 2008 R2. Hopefully I'll get around to compiling a 32-bit edition in the next couple of days.

 

I neglected to include in the original email the bug tracking site - that is https://www.dojonort...are.net/bugtraq

 

Email is below:

 

 

Good morning,

 

I would like to take a moment to say thank you to all of you for volunteering to test Home Server SMART 2012 to validate the correctness of its reporting of your Solid State Disk health. For those with client machines with SSDs, the client application WindowSMART 2012 is available as well. They share over 90% of their code so if a bug exists in one, it’ll be in the other. However, not everyone has SSDs in their servers but they do in client machines, or vice versa.

 

This email has been sent as a BCC because there are several individuals included. To protect everyone’s privacy, I’ve chosen to send this as a BCC.

 

I apologize for the delay, but I finally have beta builds of both HSS and WS posted. At present time, I’ve only got code included for SSD controllers manufactured by Indilinx, Indilinx Everest, Intel, SandForce and STEC. If the SSD(s) you have use JMicron, Micron, Samsung or SMART Modular controllers, then you probably won’t see any data reported for them, or the data will be incorrect. These are public betas and you are free to install them regardless.

 

Home Server SMART 2012 can be installed in place over the top of an existing HSS installation, provided you are running HSS 2012 v2.2.1.21 or later.

 

Whether you install HSS on your server(s) or WindowSMART on client(s), please provide me with your feedback, both good and bad. :) Screen captures can be sent via email, or saved as image files on the bug tracking website. HSS and WindowSMART both now include SmartInspect logging. These log files are saved by default in C:\ProgramData\Dojo North Software\Logs. This can be changed in the Settings of both applications (you need to restart the service for the change to take effect). On an HSS installation, the service is called Home Server SMART; on a WindowSMART installation it is called WindowSMART 2012. (The short name is “dnhsSmart” in both cases.)

 

Please include log files with your feedback, especially if you’re reporting a problem. These can get quite large, so please post these to the bug tracking website. These are not suitable to send via email unless they can be compressed to 8 MB or less. Future betas and of course the production release will provide the ability to turn off debug logging. For now, at least until I can get SSDs supported and verified by testers, the logging is enabled. If you would like to see what the logs contain before submitting them, you can download the SmartInspect Redistributable Console @ http://www.gurock.co...inspect/extras/. I take people’s privacy very seriously and I want folks to be able to see exactly what the logs contain before they get submitted.

 

The current beta of both applications is version 2.2.2.25 code-named “Middle Class Rut.”

 

If you wish to test Home Server SMART 2012, you can download it here: http://www.dojonorth...t_v2.2.2.25.zip

HSS 2012 Wiki: http://wiki.dojonort...rver_SMART_2012

 

Extract the WSSX file from the zip and install on your server.

 

If you wish to test WindowSMART 2012, you can download it here: http://www.dojonorth...t_v2.2.2.25.zip

WindowSMART Wiki: http://wiki.dojonort...indowSMART_2012

WindowSMART currently only works on 64-bit versions of Windows Vista and later. I don’t have a 32-bit build of it yet. Hopefully I can get to that this weekend.

 

Extract the contents of the zip file to a temporary folder and run Setup.exe. The Setup program checks to be sure the Visual C++ 2010 runtime and .NET Framework 4 are installed. If these are missing, Setup will ask you if you’d like to install them. The Microsoft redistributable components for both of these are included in the download. WindowSMART adds a shortcut to the Start Menu under All Programs > Dojo North Software.

 

 

Again, thank you for volunteering to help. Please shoot me a note if you have any questions, concerns or problems!

 

Best regards,

 

Matt Sawyer

Owner – Dojo North Software

49434 Tarrytown Court

Shelby Township, MI 48315

C: (five eight six) 350-eight one 1 7

msawyerNINETY-ONE <at> dojonorthsoftware (DOT) net (change the word NINETY-ONE to its appropriate numbers - I obfuscated it here on the forum to block spammers)

 

Think green! Please consider the environment before printing this email. Danke!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 9 months later...

I have SSDs in my local machine, would be willing to test n report back, however I'm running RAID 0, would this make a difference?

Edited by tealsteam
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • Rodf
      By Rodf
      I'm looking into replacing my desktop's old, failing HD with an SSD. I've got a Dell XPS 8700. I've look up the configuration on Dell's website, entering my machine's service tag (DK49122). I've found the component which is listed as:
       
      KPF74 : Module,Hard Drive,1T,S3,7.2K,5 12E,#1,G-BP INFO,1ST BOOT,HARD DRIVE HD,1TB,S3,7.2K,512E,SGT-GRDABP  
      I know it's a 1 TB drive. It looks to me like it's a SATA III drive. Am I correct? 
       
      Assuming I've correctly identified the drive, then I've found what looks like a good replacement part on Newegg which is listed like this: SAMSUNG 860 EVO Series 2.5" 1TB SATA III V-NAND 3-bit MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) MZ-76E1T0B/AM
       
      So, have a got a good replacement SSD for my machine's old HD?
    • xelent
      By xelent
      Hi there,
       
      I've just gotten my old Proliant server out from mothballs recently to use as a Backup controller for my photographic archive. It's specs are a standard G840 2.8GHz Dual core with 16 GB of ram installed with a standard 350 watt PSU. I'm running WSE 2019 with 4x1TB HDD's installed in the 4 bay drive cage. 3 drives are formatted to RAID 0 in WSE (not embedded HP RAID) and one drive acts as the system/boot drive.

      The server is surprisingly responsive given its age, with LAN transfer speeds between 84-94MBs. So has pretty much taken center stage in my backup control between my  external drives and 4x1TB RAID 0 NAS.
       
      However, I have been wanting to attach a 256GB SSD boot drive for my OS, so that I can utilize the full capacity of my 4 bay drive. It seems that the BIOS will not let you boot any HDD/SSD off the spare SATA connection on my MB. Anyway I am hoping to eventually attach a PCIe USB 3 card to that. But in the meantime I would like to boot a separate drive other than the 4 bay one already installed.

      I gather that you can install a PCIe SSD card on this machine. But it's not clear to me as to what kind of card and drive would be suitable for this server. I realize that my MB is PCIe gen 2, which will incur diminished speed compared to the latest gen 3 MBs. But should I be using NVMe or SATA m.2 drives? Or does it even matter? Also will the BIOS allow me to boot from this drive?
       
      Thanks for taking the time.
    • Karazzi
      By Karazzi
      Hi everyone.
       
      New to this forum.
      I have a gen8 microserver running at home, where I have installed an SSD in the ODD sata slot. On the SSD I have installed Ubuntu Server 18.04.
      I have then created a logical volume witht the raid controller and can then boot to the SSD. So far so good.
      My problem emerges when I reboot the system. The logical volume disapears and it gives the error: "boot logical drive is configured but is missing or offline".
      I then have to go into the utility and reconfigure the logical volume. Kind of annoying, when trying to run a headless setup.
       
    • Laris
      By Laris
      Hi all,
       
      Now I share my extreamly mod for your reference
       



    • ICYDOCK_Chris
      By ICYDOCK_Chris
      ICY DOCK is the leading expert in data storage enclosures and accessories.
       

       
      Introducing ToughArmor
      ToughArmor is ICY DOCK’s rugged enterprise-grade line of 2.5” SSD and HDD enclosures, utilizing the standard external 5.25” bay, external 3.5” bay (floppy bay), and the slim optical bay (ODD bay). All ToughArmor models feature ruggedized full-metal enclosures and trays, to keep your sensitive data protected, as well as meeting many flammability requirements. It features many high-density storage options, supporting as many as 16x 2.5” drives, or as few as one. Models are available to support SATA, SAS, and now, U.2 NVMe drives, giving you flexibility in choosing drives that work best for you. The strength and build quality of all of our products is backed by a full 3-year warranty against all defects. ToughArmor is used and approved by Tier 1 companies such as Hewlett Packard (HP), General Electric, NASA, as well as the US Armed Forces. For more information on our ToughArmor line, read our ToughArmor documentation here. Links to all of the products discussed here can be found in the documentation. All ToughArmor products can be view here.
       
      ToughArmor for SATA 3.5” / 5.25” Bays
      For SATA and SAS drives installing into 3.5” and 5.25” bays, we have a large number of options available. In the 3.5” bay, there are models that support one to three drives, some with features such as key-lock trays and hardware RAID capabilities. The larger 5.25” bay supports between four and eight drives in a single bay, and up to 16 when using two bays. These denser options offer cooling fans, to keep the large number of drives cool under heavy load. These models have a wide array of uses. The MB991U3-1SB is our portable ToughArmor unit you can take anywhere, and works over USB. The MB992SKR-B is a 2-bay model with a hardware RAID chip, with modes for RAID 0, RAID 1, BIG, and JBOD.
       
      There are also our more traditional drive carriers that install into a single 5.25” bay. While these models don’t have USB support or a RAID chip, they still have direct SATA connections, the full-metal enclosure, and the 3-year warranty.  The 4-bay (MB994SP-4S), 6-bay (MB996SP-6SB), and 8-bay (MB998SP-B) models are perfect for any general applications that require hot-swappable SATA hard drives and SSDs in a dense storage enclosure.
       

       
      ToughArmor for NVME
      Recently, ICY DOCK has released the first-ever hot-swap cages for U.2 NVMe drives.  U.2 drives use the standard 2.5” size familiar from SATA SSDs, but utilize the NVMe specification allowing for transfer rates of up to 32GB/s. ICY DOCK U.2 NVMe cages come in one and four bay models, and utilize a single Mini-SAS HD connection for each drive. The single-bay model (MB601VK-B) fits in a single 3.5” bay, great for space-limited tasks that require only a single drive.  Small-form-factor systems, DVR systems, and photo/video editing systems can benefit from high-performance storage in a small space. If you need more drives, the 4-bay model (MB699VP-B) is the one for you, and even works great in RAID setups.  These are used in datacenters around the world, that need dense NVMe based storage. Both of these models use a Mini-SAS HD port / cable for each drive, so make sure to prepare your system with enough Mini-SAS HD ports.
       

       
      ToughArmor for Optical Drive Bays
      ICY DOCK also has several drive cages that fit into slim (12.7mm) and ultra-slim (9.5mm) optical drive bays. These can serve to replace existing drive readers in laptops and desktop systems, and can also be paired with several of our 5.25” bay brackets. Perfect for space-critical applications that require drives to be installed in the smallest possible space. Common uses are in Small-Form-Factor PCs, media PCs, Home Theater PCs (HTPC), and security footage systems. In industrial uses, these are often found in 1U and 2U rack-mounted systems with limited space availability, and portable workstations/laptops.
       

       
      If you have any questions about the models mentioned here, or anything else, send us an email at tech@icydock.com. We offer first-class customer support for all our products, from pre-purchasing info, product selection help, walking you through installation, and issue troubleshooting. In addition to email, we offer phone and live web-chat customer support, which can be found here.  Our knowledgeable support technicians are available Monday-Friday from 10:00am-5:00pm PST.
       
       
×
×
  • Create New...