Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)

vt-d question


moto316
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi guys im new here but not new to whs. Im trying to figure out if vt-d is something that I need or if vt-x will suffice. Right now I have whsv1 running on an old amd 3800+ x2 with 2GB ram. My current desktop is an i7 2600k with 16GB of ram. My original intention was to upgrade the desktop to the new ivy bridge parts coming out in april and move the sandy bridge cpu/mb/ram to the server and install server 2008 r2 with hyper-v and have a whs 2011 vm on it but I just read that the k series processors and most z68 boards don't support vt-d. What im not clear of is what I will be sacrificing by not having vt-d opposed to vt-x (which the 2600k supports). My only peripherals that I plan on installing in the box are an intel gigabit nic and possibly a raid card (ill probably start off with the chipset raid at first). I plan on using an existing 10k rpm 150gb raptor drive that I have to install server 2008 on as well as the whs vm and a few other vm's as well. Then I will have a 3x2TB raid 5 array that I will dedicate to storage for data that the whs will manage (media,backups,etc.)

 

Will I be able to successfully implement this without vt-d?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Vt-d is mainly for device mapping such as a USB controller, sound card, or other device. In a basic Hyper-V setup it should not effect you and should not be necessary. Only a handful of motherboards even support it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also I came across a thread that I cant find right now that was discussing the best disk setup for performance, I remember it saying that you should dedicate one disk to Server 08 R2 itself, then a disk to hold all the VM's and another array for your WHS storage. Is that the best setup to minimize potential disk bottlenecks?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also I came across a thread that I cant find right now that was discussing the best disk setup for performance, I remember it saying that you should dedicate one disk to Server 08 R2 itself, then a disk to hold all the VM's and another array for your WHS storage. Is that the best setup to minimize potential disk bottlenecks?

 

Yes, that is the way you want to do it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

moto316, on 18 January 2012 - 03:50 PM, said:

 

Also I came across a thread that I cant find right now that was discussing the best disk setup for performance, I remember it saying that you should dedicate one disk to Server 08 R2 itself, then a disk to hold all the VM's and another array for your WHS storage. Is that the best setup to minimize potential disk bottlenecks?

 

 

 

 

In its simplist form yes, then think about mirring the OS putting VM's on SSD's mirrored, media on a Raid 6 or 10 along with dedicating or teaming nics for throughput

 

as for motherboards with VT-d snoop around on supermicro website :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I highly recommend mirroring of the OS drive. For media I think RAID 5 is fine, as long as it's backed up, but RAID 6 certainly wouldn't hurt. I think RAID 10 may be a bit overkill for media but it's certainly not wrong.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also I came across a thread that I cant find right now that was discussing the best disk setup for performance, I remember it saying that you should dedicate one disk to Server 08 R2 itself, then a disk to hold all the VM's and another array for your WHS storage. Is that the best setup to minimize potential disk bottlenecks?

 

I would suggest checking out the configuration strategy outlined in their backup strategies by PCDoc and NoControl.

 

There is also a good reference Windows Server 2008 R2 Unleashed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In its simplist form yes, then think about mirring the OS putting VM's on SSD's mirrored, media on a Raid 6 or 10 along with dedicating or teaming nics for throughput

 

as for motherboards with VT-d snoop around on supermicro website

 

Welcome to [H]ardOCP does HyperV. ;)

 

 

 

 

*snip* I just read that the k series processors and most z68 boards don't support vt-d. What im not clear of is what I will be sacrificing by not having vt-d opposed to vt-x (which the 2600k supports). My only peripherals that I plan on installing in the box are an intel gigabit nic and possibly a raid card (ill probably start off with the chipset raid at first). I plan on using an existing 10k rpm 150gb raptor drive that I have to install server 2008 on as well as the whs vm and a few other vm's as well. Then I will have a 3x2TB raid 5 array that I will dedicate to storage for data that the whs will manage (media,backups,etc.)

 

I have a Gigabyte Z68 with a 2500K so similar situation. The only reason I've even considered moving to a 2500 (non-K) was because I've had some issues in getting my BluRay reader/writer to pass through to my WHS2011 VM as a BR device. It is seen as an optical device, and can even rip DVDs with MyMovies, but not BluRays (at least not without some finagling.) I have a 10TB RAID5 on a dedicated card that I pass directly through to my WHS2011 VM, as you can do with any hard drive whether SATA or eSATA. As PCDoc said, there are some specific uses for VT-d but you haven't listed any that require it.

 

The only other potential advantage would be for (as above) USB attached devices. I use a Win7 VM as my iTunes home now that all my devices are on iOS 5x and can sync wirelessly. Originally I installed it on a laptop, synced all my devices to it via USB an then enabled wireless sync, and then exported the laptop to a HyperV VM which I've been running since. I did that to get around the inability to pass a USB connected device direclty through to a VM. Since then I've found a very easy and fully functional network USB software program which is free for 15 days so I wouldn't even do the clone OS anymore. I just installed the USB over network server on Server 2008R2 and the client in whatever VM I want and voila - I can "magically" connect a USB device to whichever VM I choose. Nice thing is I can even plug it in to a laptop upstairs and it acts as if it is directly connected to one of my VMs. Very convenient for my lazy butt. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to [H]ardOCP does HyperV. ;)

 

 

 

 

[/font][/color]

 

I have a Gigabyte Z68 with a 2500K so similar situation. The only reason I've even considered moving to a 2500 (non-K) was because I've had some issues in getting my BluRay reader/writer to pass through to my WHS2011 VM as a BR device. It is seen as an optical device, and can even rip DVDs with MyMovies, but not BluRays (at least not without some finagling.) I have a 10TB RAID5 on a dedicated card that I pass directly through to my WHS2011 VM, as you can do with any hard drive whether SATA or eSATA. As PCDoc said, there are some specific uses for VT-d but you haven't listed any that require it.

 

The only other potential advantage would be for (as above) USB attached devices. I use a Win7 VM as my iTunes home now that all my devices are on iOS 5x and can sync wirelessly. Originally I installed it on a laptop, synced all my devices to it via USB an then enabled wireless sync, and then exported the laptop to a HyperV VM which I've been running since. I did that to get around the inability to pass a USB connected device direclty through to a VM. Since then I've found a very easy and fully functional network USB software program which is free for 15 days so I wouldn't even do the clone OS anymore. I just installed the USB over network server on Server 2008R2 and the client in whatever VM I want and voila - I can "magically" connect a USB device to whichever VM I choose. Nice thing is I can even plug it in to a laptop upstairs and it acts as if it is directly connected to one of my VMs. Very convenient for my lazy butt. :)

 

I know you mentioned it once, but what was the device you used for USB/IP. I would like to try one. Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know you mentioned it once, but what was the device you used for USB/IP. I would like to try one. Thanks

 

They were very creative about the name and website. It is: http://www.usb-over-network.com

 

I am using the USB Over Network software. They also have a USB for Remote Desktop ($50 more) that I haven't figured out what additional benefit is provided. I am already using the client in a VM, and accessing it via remote desktop, so not sure what the difference is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...