Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)

Storage Spaces in Windows 8


vinylfreak
 Share

Recommended Posts

Check out this blog post on Windows 8 Storage Spaces.

 

Its pretty interesting! ;-)

 

http://blogs.msdn.co...efficiency.aspx

 

Very Interesting Indeed!! Thanks for the posting!!

 

I hope Dave, Mike and others will have a chance to look at this at CES and fill us in when they get back!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I read the article correctly, you set the maximum pool size in advance and then add drives to fill the predetermined space requirements?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I read the article correctly, you set the maximum pool size in advance and then add drives to fill the predetermined space requirements?

You set the maximum size of the space, not the pool. The pool size is the total size of the physical drives in the pool. The space is the storage volume you created which gets its storage from the pool. You set the maximum size of the space; that maximum size can be greater or less than the size of the pool. You can only increase the size of a space. If the maximum size of the space is greater than the size of the pool, well, then you can't actually hit the maximum size.

 

Here's how this might work in the context of WHS. You create a pool with 6 x 2TB drives. You create a spaces like this:

  • "Photos", mirrored, max 50 TB
  • "Recorded TV", parity, max 8 TB
  • "Music", parity, max 50 TB
  • "Documents", mirrored, max 50 TB

Anything you store in the Photos or Documents spaces will have at least two copies stored.With 6 drives, I think you get 3 copies of each file. Since the max size of the spaces are larger than your pool size, the only limit on how much you can store is the pool size itself.

 

Anything you store in Music gets stored using parity storage. With six drives, that may mean one extra parity segment for every 3 data segments, or ever 4 segments, or every 5 segments; I can't tell from the blog post. It's enough extra data that you could have 2 down drives and still get all your data out. Again, the only limit to how much you can store is the total capacity of the pool.

 

Anything you store in Recorded TV also uses parity storage. There's an artificial limit you've set of 8 TB, which means there will always be at least 4 TB reserved for the other spaces. You can grow that limit, but can't shrink it.

 

All of the data from all four spaces is spread across the six drives of the pool. As long as you have a majority of the drives available (that's 4 out of 6, 3 out of 5, 3 out of 4, 2 out of 3, 1 out of 2), all redundantly stored data (either mirrored or parity) is available.

 

That's the way I read it, anyway.

 

(Full disclosure: I work for Microsoft. I don't work on that team, though, and I'm not revealing any non-public information.)

 

Jason

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You set the maximum size of the space, not the pool. The pool size is the total size of the physical drives in the pool. The space is the storage volume you created which gets its storage from the pool. You set the maximum size of the space; that maximum size can be greater or less than the size of the pool. You can only increase the size of a space. If the maximum size of the space is greater than the size of the pool, well, then you can't actually hit the maximum size.

 

Here's how this might work in the context of WHS. You create a pool with 6 x 2TB drives. You create a spaces like this:

  • "Photos", mirrored, max 50 TB
  • "Recorded TV", parity, max 8 TB
  • "Music", parity, max 50 TB
  • "Documents", mirrored, max 50 TB

Anything you store in the Photos or Documents spaces will have at least two copies stored.With 6 drives, I think you get 3 copies of each file. Since the max size of the spaces are larger than your pool size, the only limit on how much you can store is the pool size itself.

 

Anything you store in Music gets stored using parity storage. With six drives, that may mean one extra parity segment for every 3 data segments, or ever 4 segments, or every 5 segments; I can't tell from the blog post. It's enough extra data that you could have 2 down drives and still get all your data out. Again, the only limit to how much you can store is the total capacity of the pool.

 

Anything you store in Recorded TV also uses parity storage. There's an artificial limit you've set of 8 TB, which means there will always be at least 4 TB reserved for the other spaces. You can grow that limit, but can't shrink it.

 

All of the data from all four spaces is spread across the six drives of the pool. As long as you have a majority of the drives available (that's 4 out of 6, 3 out of 5, 3 out of 4, 2 out of 3, 1 out of 2), all redundantly stored data (either mirrored or parity) is available.

 

That's the way I read it, anyway.

 

(Full disclosure: I work for Microsoft. I don't work on that team, though, and I'm not revealing any non-public information.)

 

Jason

 

Thanks for getting into the details. Looks very promising.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You set the maximum size of the space, not the pool. The pool size is the total size of the physical drives in the pool. The space is the storage volume you created which gets its storage from the pool. You set the maximum size of the space; that maximum size can be greater or less than the size of the pool. You can only increase the size of a space. If the maximum size of the space is greater than the size of the pool, well, then you can't actually hit the maximum size.

 

Here's how this might work in the context of WHS. You create a pool with 6 x 2TB drives. You create a spaces like this:

  • "Photos", mirrored, max 50 TB
  • "Recorded TV", parity, max 8 TB
  • "Music", parity, max 50 TB
  • "Documents", mirrored, max 50 TB

Anything you store in the Photos or Documents spaces will have at least two copies stored.With 6 drives, I think you get 3 copies of each file. Since the max size of the spaces are larger than your pool size, the only limit on how much you can store is the pool size itself.

 

Anything you store in Music gets stored using parity storage. With six drives, that may mean one extra parity segment for every 3 data segments, or ever 4 segments, or every 5 segments; I can't tell from the blog post. It's enough extra data that you could have 2 down drives and still get all your data out. Again, the only limit to how much you can store is the total capacity of the pool.

 

Anything you store in Recorded TV also uses parity storage. There's an artificial limit you've set of 8 TB, which means there will always be at least 4 TB reserved for the other spaces. You can grow that limit, but can't shrink it.

 

All of the data from all four spaces is spread across the six drives of the pool. As long as you have a majority of the drives available (that's 4 out of 6, 3 out of 5, 3 out of 4, 2 out of 3, 1 out of 2), all redundantly stored data (either mirrored or parity) is available.

 

That's the way I read it, anyway.

 

(Full disclosure: I work for Microsoft. I don't work on that team, though, and I'm not revealing any non-public information.)

 

Jason

 

Wow, that's a lot of info! Thanks so much for posting it.

 

That made my head hurt! :unsure:

 

Indeed!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...