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SSD Setup Practices by Forum Users


ImTheTypeOfGuy
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It could. The less writing you do to the SSD the longer it will last, as I understand it anyway.

 

Ok, looks like I will be moving them then lol.

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Ok, looks like I will be moving them then lol.

 

Yeah, keep in mind that most of the SSD that are out now are ONLY GOOD for 2,000,000 hours of work time! (sarcasm) So make sure you don't write to much to the drive!

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Yeah, keep in mind that most of the SSD that are out now are ONLY GOOD for 2,000,000 hours of work time! (sarcasm) So make sure you don't write to much to the drive!

 

This doesn't really make a lot of sense to me. Why would you measure a device that is good for a certain number of operations in hours? Measuring in hours makes some sense for spinning drives, but it doesn't seem to make any sense for SSD drives.

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This doesn't really make a lot of sense to me. Why would you measure a device that is good for a certain number of operations in hours? Measuring in hours makes some sense for spinning drives, but it doesn't seem to make any sense for SSD drives.

 

Well not sure what to tell you, I am not making this up, here is a snipping from Mushkins webpage with the specs for the Chronos Drive (which is not even their best drive):

 

Mushkin%20SSD%20MTBF.JPG

 

 

And lets face it, at the current rate that these drives are getting bigger and cheaper, we ARE NEVER going to have one long enough to wear one out! Before we replace it with the Next fast bigger unit(s).

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I wasn't at all doubting what you said, only that it doesn't make sense. It wouldn't be the first time a manufacturer did something nonsensical. I suspect Mushkins is doing it only to be compatible with the way spinning drives are spec'd. In other words, it's what people are used to.

 

As far as life expectancy is concerned, I have a different view. I have drives more than 8 years old that I'm still using (e.g. my router and SpinRite machines). While I'm sure I will buy newer, larger SSD's in the future, I would be very happy to take an older one and re-purpose it in my HTPC for example, or in my router and SpinRite machines. If SSD's have long enough lifespans, it would be a great way to upgrade my older boxes without having to spend any more money. ;)

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I agree totally, I plan on 'passing them down the line' in my machines also, but I am not to concerned with wearing one out, all the drives have additional memory for the 'over provisioning' so when some of the cells do go bad we will most likely never even see it.

 

I am not against, moving the DOCUMENTS and DESKTOP folder to another drive (I did) as I do most of my work from the desktop, eventually moving the files to were they will finally live, my only point of the comment was not to get too worried about wear, some of the original drives, that were only 60Gb and down I might of worried about but the current generation units that are 32nm I have no worries about.

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Again correct me if I am wrong but MBTF and cellular wear are two different things. MBTF includes every aspect of possible failure, so in that 2 million hours the controller might give out, not the NAND.

 

And like cooper, I also am not concerned with the cellular wear, since we tend to get new drives now and then to replace the old ones. I have my 2nd gen intel that I might soon swap out and put into my server as OS ssd and I'm not afraid that the drive will give out. And I haven't done anything to preserve the drive. I store all my documents on it, install all my programs on it and so on.

 

The only thing I've done is disabled the indexing for the reason pcdoc suggested.

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Again correct me if I am wrong but MBTF and cellular wear are two different things. MBTF includes every aspect of possible failure, so in that 2 million hours the controller might give out, not the NAND.

 

And like cooper, I also am not concerned with the cellular wear, since we tend to get new drives now and then to replace the old ones. I have my 2nd gen intel that I might soon swap out and put into my server as OS ssd and I'm not afraid that the drive will give out. And I haven't done anything to preserve the drive. I store all my documents on it, install all my programs on it and so on.

 

The only thing I've done is disabled the indexing for the reason pcdoc suggested.

 

You are correct that the MTBF is typically for hard failures such as component failures in powered but static states. Failures due to overwrites are a different story all together. If you are interested, I just did a post of SSD setup.

 

http://thedocsworld.net/ssd-setup-and-optimizing/

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Again correct me if I am wrong but MBTF and cellular wear are two different things. MBTF includes every aspect of possible failure, so in that 2 million hours the controller might give out, not the NAND.

 

And like cooper, I also am not concerned with the cellular wear, since we tend to get new drives now and then to replace the old ones. I have my 2nd gen intel that I might soon swap out and put into my server as OS ssd and I'm not afraid that the drive will give out. And I haven't done anything to preserve the drive. I store all my documents on it, install all my programs on it and so on.

 

The only thing I've done is disabled the indexing for the reason pcdoc suggested.

 

I tend to keep drives running for a long time, 5 years plus at least. I know that's somewhat unusual but it's the way I roll :) Actually, 99.9% of my drives simply get obsolete before they die. I'm about to give a number of surplus 250GB drives to my kids. They're not into computers like I am so these drives will add a ton of space to their setups.

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