Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)

Does Stablebit scanner work with drives in RAID setup?


fredload
 Share

Recommended Posts

Anybody know if stablebit scanner works with HD's setup in a RAID 5? I am using a rocket raid card setup in a raid 5, with 5 2tb drives. Would like to use stablebit scanner but I can't seem to find any info about it working correctly with RAID.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To be honest, I can't really see how it could. The array appears as 1 drive to the OS. Since SB runs in the OS I assume it will see the same thing the OS sees. Not sure if it would try to analyse the array or not, or that it would be valid even if it did.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whether valid or not, I can report that StableBit Scanner did scan my entire RAID 5 and came up with zero errors.

 

It did not report on individual drives, just the whole array which is equal to 4 x 2TB.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, that's kinda what I was thinking. It would be interesting to get the author's feedback on the validity of running SBS on a RAID array, and fantastic if it is valid. I really like the idea of having a full-time built in disk scanner/checker.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with dvn...my RAID 5 has not reported an errors. It did save me on one of my backup drives...let me know it was failing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sent a note off to Stablebit inquiring about using SBS with RAID. Below is the response from Alex at CoveCube concerning using SBS with RAID. I will install SBS on my WHS 2011, test and see what kind of results I get and report back.

 

Response from Alex:

Product: StableBit Scanner

Topic: A question about how the product works

 

Brian,

 

The Scanner will see the disks as windows sees them, it will not be able to scan the disks individually, but will scan then all as one large disk (I believe). Also, smart may not work with RAID, it depends on the controller drivers.

 

The best thing to do it to download the 30 day trial and install it.

 

It should at the very least perform its basic function, which is to scan the RAID volume and ensure that all the sectors are readable.

 

Regards,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I checked my WHS 2011 RAID5 array last night and StableBit is not showing any errors. I also cheked via the GUI from HighPoint and none of my drives are showing any errors. Hopefully this can allow me two avenues for reporting of any errors. I guess StableBit won't tell me which drive in the array is having errors but as long as I am warned of an error i will be fine...I can then just start looking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This all sounds pretty much as expected, and it's pretty good news really. JediTim, I'm thinking you can probably get a pretty good idea of which drive is at fault simply by the position of the bad sector in the overall map. It won't be an exact technique, but may be good enough.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To be honest, I can't really see how it could. The array appears as 1 drive to the OS. Since SB runs in the OS I assume it will see the same thing the OS sees. Not sure if it would try to analyse the array or not, or that it would be valid even if it did.

I think it all depends on the device driver for the I/O controller. I'll cite one of my favorite products, HD Sentinel, as the example. Their tool can monitor the health of disks that are part of RAID arrays, including the Intel and nVidia RAIDs in two of my desktops. If you visit hdsentinel.com, they tell you which vendor RAID controllers they support.

 

My guess is that the vendor has written their API in such a manner where it's possible to query the individual disks in the array. More likely than not they did this so their own tools can talk to the disks (i.e. Intel's Matrix Storage Manager). But if API was written with publicly exposed methods, and the documentation of said methods was available, theoretically anybody could program against that API. If StableBit scanner talks directly to the device drivers, it's very reasonable it could "see" the physical disks in the array.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it all depends on the device driver for the I/O controller. I'll cite one of my favorite products, HD Sentinel, as the example. Their tool can monitor the health of disks that are part of RAID arrays, including the Intel and nVidia RAIDs in two of my desktops. If you visit hdsentinel.com, they tell you which vendor RAID controllers they support.

 

My guess is that the vendor has written their API in such a manner where it's possible to query the individual disks in the array. More likely than not they did this so their own tools can talk to the disks (i.e. Intel's Matrix Storage Manager). But if API was written with publicly exposed methods, and the documentation of said methods was available, theoretically anybody could program against that API. If StableBit scanner talks directly to the device drivers, it's very reasonable it could "see" the physical disks in the array.

 

Good points. I guess I was thinking there's no way the RAID maker would expose how to talk to their controller. Very cool if they do though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...