Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)

Will an Atom do the job?


Mr Pleasant
 Share

Recommended Posts

So far, Ii've built 3 2011 boxes, 1 - D510, 1 - Core i3 and 1 Core 2 Duo. The D510 works great for basic file serving. I have the box at my mom's house. It handles backups really well, is quite and low power. I even use it to upload files using remote access for a simple offsite backup solution. It can get slow, but I think that's more of a function of the drives I have installed.

 

That said, the only concern I have with the Zotac NM10 board is that it only has 2 sata ports. So, unless you give up the optical drive, you're pretty much stuck with a single drive pulling double duty for both OS and data. It's possible you can toss in a PCI-Express x1 card, and that will add 2 more drives to your solution, but depending on the size of your movie collection, even this may not be enough. Stepping into an i3 solution can give you as many as 4 onboard SATA ports as well as a PCI Express x16 slot for a heaftier 4 or even 8 port SATA card for even more drives.

 

So, forget about the CPU limitation. Think about how much storage you're going to need before investing in your WHS 2011 build. Good luck!

An interesting angle from which to look at it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

PCIe X1 with 4 SATA ports are available. Making 6 drives possible

 

True, but 4 drives could easily blow out the 250 MB/s bus speed limitation of PCI Express x1. If I was looking to build a low cost file server strictly for backups and basic file sharing, then this would be fine, but streaming video by potentially multiple people in the household would make me nervous.

 

In the end, I would say if you're on a budget and simply want to get started, the Zotac board is a great way to get your feet wet. As your needs increase, you can always swap in a different board, reusing your case, power supply, hard drives, etc. But, if you're looking for an experience similar to your desktop build, where you'll enjoy this Home Server for many years, streaming video to DLNA equiped TVs around your house, then go for a board with either more SATA ports or a PCI Express x16 slot to ensure good I/O performance.

 

 

Update: I stand corrected. The x1 lane on the board supports up to 500 MB/s. For sequential I/O, it would still be close, but having 4 drives sharing the lane would be usable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My opinion is that most do not buys servers every month. I would spend the $100 for peace of mind and expandibility for the next couple of years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

True, but 4 drives could easily blow out the 250 MB/s bus speed limitation of PCI Express x1.

Hmmm, that speed is for PCI Express v1 isn't it? Are there any mobos out today that don't support at least v2? I think most new boards actually support v3.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An update: my colleague offered me his surplus kit at such a reasonable price it was worth it for the case and drives alone. I've bought it on the basis I can spend the next few months experimenting and basically teaching myself the whole home networking thing from a standing start. The mobo has 6 SATA ports, just to clear that up, but the limitations of the D510 have become fairly apparent already. For clarity, although it has onboard gigabit LAN, I am currently wired directly to a very modest router that limits it to 100. Unless otherwise stated, all experiments have been via Cat5e.

 

What it can do:

serve up files to an Xtreamer Sidewinder MkI, including Blu-ray rips (MKV). These appear fine, but I've had to select Good or Medium quality media streaming (can't remember which word is used), according to the guidance given by WHS 2011 help files. I don't know what the impact is on resolution or frame rates, but I'd far rather be on Best quality. One batch of tests was horribly stuttery, but all was fine when I quit Air Video Server running in the background. Maybe a coincidence?

 

Haven't done any back ups to it yet, but transferring photos and movie files around is fine.

 

Using Air Video on an iPad is no problem when I select DVD rips, but...

 

What it can't do

...as suspected the screen just goes blank if I select a Blu-ray rip. On the fly conversion isn't happening. My E6750-based PC (four years old next month) has no problem with this.

 

I've yet to get a successful link to the kids' XBox 360. Connection, yes, but "No videos". I'm working on this as time allows. My guess is I'll get DVDs playing OK, but it won't be able to handle Blu-rays. For the record I've installed the PS3 Media Server which other people seem to have good results with.

 

When I'm in a property of my own again and fully wired up, I'll look to upgrade to something i3/Sandybridge based as recommended.

 

All good fun! I've been waiting a long time to get into this and now it's finally here I'm going to enjoy it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

PS There's a little Geforce 210 graphics card available from Zotac that I believe will slot happily into that board. The main selling point of course is the upgrade it provides in HDMI output, but would the CPU be able to hand over some work to the GPU?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...