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Possible to sync ipod with Windows 7 VM in Hyper-V?


nlitend1
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I know usb devices are not supported by hyper-v in 2008R2, but I hear there are work-arounds for some USB devices. Is accessing a device via itunes possible?

 

I currently use my HTPC to sync my ipod with, but I am wondering if it would be possible to do it with a Windows 7 VM in Hyper-V. The reason I don't like to sync it with the HTPC is because I would like to be able to RDP in and manage the itunes/sync without interrupting WMC playback. I also would like to keep the HTPC for strictly WMC duties and not bog it down with the arguably bloated itunes.

 

Thanks.

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I know usb devices are not supported by hyper-v in 2008R2, but I hear there are work-arounds for some USB devices. Is accessing a device via itunes possible?

 

I currently use my HTPC to sync my ipod with, but I am wondering if it would be possible to do it with a Windows 7 VM in Hyper-V. The reason I don't like to sync it with the HTPC is because I would like to be able to RDP in and manage the itunes/sync without interrupting WMC playback. I also would like to keep the HTPC for strictly WMC duties and not bog it down with the arguably bloated itunes.

 

Thanks.

 

Sorry that it won't work as no-control indicated.

 

I must point out though that itunes is NOT arguably bloated. It is proven that it IS bloated, and many things worse than that. Sorry for my rant and welcome to the forums. ;)

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I know usb devices are not supported by hyper-v in 2008R2, but I hear there are work-arounds for some USB devices. Is accessing a device via itunes possible?

 

I currently use my HTPC to sync my ipod with, but I am wondering if it would be possible to do it with a Windows 7 VM in Hyper-V. The reason I don't like to sync it with the HTPC is because I would like to be able to RDP in and manage the itunes/sync without interrupting WMC playback. I also would like to keep the HTPC for strictly WMC duties and not bog it down with the arguably bloated itunes.

 

Thanks.

 

Hi and welcome to the board.

 

I don't know what your total set-up is so I'm kind of shooting in the dark but have you looked at Oracle's Virtual Machine Box?

 

It has an extension pack that supports USB 2.0 -- you can read a summary at http://en.wikipedia....wiki/VirtualBox where it says

 

A USB 1.1 controller is emulated so that any USB devices attached to the host can be seen in the guest. The closed source extension pack adds a USB 2.0 controller and, if VirtualBox acts as an RDP server, it can also use USB devices on the remote RDP client as if they were connected to the host.

 

Features only available with the extension pack

Some features require the installation of the closed-source "VirtualBox Extension Pack"[28]:

  • Support for a virtual USB 2.0 controller (EHCI)
  • VirtualBox RDP: support for proprietary remote connection protocol developed by Microsoft and Citrix.
  • PXE boot for Intel cards

and has a standard feature set that includes:

  • 64-bit guests (64-bit hosts with CPU virtualization extensions)
  • NCQ support for SATA, SCSI and SAS raw disks and partitions
  • Snapshots
  • Seamless mode
  • Clipboard
  • Shared folders
  • Special drivers and utilities to facilitate switching between systems
  • Command line interaction (in addition to the GUI)
  • Public API (Java, Python, SOAP, XPCOM) to control VM configuration and execution[27]
  • Nested paging for AMD-V and Intel VT (only for Intel Nehalem processors and up)
  • Raw hard disk access - allows physical hard disk partitions on the host system to appear in the guest system
  • VMware Virtual Machine Disk (VMDK) format support - allows VirtualBox to exchange disk images with VMware
  • Microsoft VHD support
  • 3D virtualization (Limited support for OpenGL was added to v2.1, more support was added to v2.2, OpenGL 2.0 and Direct3D support was added in VirtualBox 3.0)
  • SMP support (up to 32 virtual CPUs), since version 3.0
  • Teleportation (aka Live Migration), since version 3.1
  • 2D video acceleration, since version 3.1

  • Mac OS X server guest support - experimental
  • Memory ballooning
  • RAM deduplication (Page Fusion) for Windows guests on 64-bit hosts
  • CPU hot-plugging for Linux (hot-add and hot-remove) and certain Windows guests (hot-add only)
  • Deleting snapshots while the VM is running
  • Multi-monitor guest setups in the GUI, for Windows guests
  • LSI Logic SAS controller emulation
  • Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) video acceleration
  • Run and control guest applications from the host - for automated software deployments
  • The PUEL/OSE separation was given up in favor of an open source base product and a closed source extension pack that can be installed on top of the base product. As part of this change, additional components of VirtualBox were made open source (installers, documentation, device drivers)
  • Intel HD audio emulation
  • Intel ICH9 chipset emulation
  • A new VM storage scheme where all VM data is stored in one single folder to improve VM portability
  • Several UI enhancements including a new look with VM preview and scale mode
  • On 32-bit hosts, VMs can allocate more than 1.5 GB of RAM
  • In addition to OVF, the single file OVA format is supported
  • CPU use and IO bandwidth can be limited per VM
  • Support for Apple DMG images (DVD)
  • Multi-monitor guest setups for Linux/Solaris guests (previously Windows only)
  • Resizing of VDI and VHD images

 

 

 

I'm finding VM VirtualBox very robust and am running it now on top of a HTPC build with a i3-2120 -- I haven't noticed any performance degradation while running Windows Media Center -- but I've only been testing this set-up for a few weeks so I'm not very authoritative source -- It may be worth a try and since the price is right (free) it's hard to argue with.

 

Hope this helps.

 

PS: for iTunes you really wouldn't need much in the way of resources -- I've run it and sync my iTouch and iPad on my Acer laptop while running Office Outlook & Excel with IE open without any problems.

Edited by Joe_Miner
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  • 2 weeks later...

 

if VirtualBox acts as an RDP server, it can also use USB devices on the remote RDP client as if they were connected to the host.

 

 

This is very intriguing.

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  • 1 month later...

Followup: VMWare player (free) also supports USB passthrough. Even better, I created a Win 7 VM using VMWare player and connected my iPad to it, then converted the VMDK (VMWare virtual drive) to VHD (Hyper-V virtual drive) and loaded it onto my Hyper-V system. I now sync wirelessly to that system and can have it running on my already up and stable 2008R2 box.

 

You could do it more quickly by using the USB pass though trial software and then switching to wireless sync, but the way I did it allows me to export the VM back to VMWare (or VirtualBox) on a standalone machine for USB passthrough if needed.

 

Might ask why not just keep it on the VMWare player (or VirtualBox.) For me it is because the system I had VMWare player on is a linux based laptop that I don't want to keep on all the time or use just for iTunes and waste the memory. This way I can use the system I already have running.

 

If interested, the software for VMDK to VHD is called (wait for it...) VMDK2VHD. The most recent version is about five years old (1.0.13) but works just great. Just convert the VD to VHD, create a new virtual machine, and use the VHD as the hard drive.

http://Vmdk2Vhd-1.0.13

 

One point - the software runs on XP, Vista or Windows 7 but not on 2008R2 even with .NET installed.

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