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Microsoft should have marketed WHS 2011 as a home Cloud Server


rgarner
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I use mine as a CLOUD server (its such a buzzword the people would pay attention if MS renamed it)

 

I think people would really be interested in a "Windows Home Cloud Server 2011"

 

I archive my HD media center recordings, copied 11000 mp3s, copied 10000 pictures, and all my documents and downloads. WHS 2011 allows me to stream all my music, recordings, pictures and files over the internet to my laptop (and eventuall my windows phone 7).

 

Ive also added the RemoteLauncher add-in to allow me to remotely use different applications like MS Office (similar to remoteapp in Windows terminal services).

 

WHS 2011 is great. Ive shown it to several people and they all want something just like WHS 2011 to use to access over the Net but no one has heard of it.

 

Anyway, I think MS should partner with Home and Garden/DIY TV and create a home technology tv show that comes on similar to Bath Crashers and Yard Crashers where people come in and setup home networks. They could use WHS 2011 at the center of the project and millions of people would be introduced to the product.

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I use mine as a CLOUD server (its such a buzzword the people would pay attention if MS renamed it)

 

I think people would really be interested in a "Windows Home Cloud Server 2011"

 

I archive my HD media center recordings, copied 11000 mp3s, copied 10000 pictures, and all my documents and downloads. WHS 2011 allows me to stream all my music, recordings, pictures and files over the internet to my laptop (and eventuall my windows phone 7).

 

Ive also added the RemoteLauncher add-in to allow me to remotely use different applications like MS Office (similar to remoteapp in Windows terminal services).

 

WHS 2011 is great. Ive shown it to several people and they all want something just like WHS 2011 to use to access over the Net but no one has heard of it.

 

Anyway, I think MS should partner with Home and Garden/DIY TV and create a home technology tv show that comes on similar to Bath Crashers and Yard Crashers where people come in and setup home networks. They could use WHS 2011 at the center of the project and millions of people would be introduced to the product.

So when are you applying to host the show? :) j/k

 

At first I was thinking "this guy's nuts" but now I'm thinking it's not so crazy. Problem is, MS is probably not inventive enough to do it.

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So when are you applying to host the show? :) j/k

 

At first I was thinking "this guy's nuts" but now I'm thinking it's not so crazy. Problem is, MS is probably not inventive enough to do it.

 

MS relies way too much on its partners to make fantastic products with its software. Thats probably were the lack of inventiveness comes in. They should do more on their own like they did with xbox. But they dont want to compete with their Windows computer hardware partners. Oh well

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Now that is a good idea. Only problem is the only people who would watch it are the ones who probably already know how to do it.

 

On second thought, you could say the same thing about other DIY shows...

 

Man - DAVE! Are you listening? You wanted to branch out and get a new population segment instead of all of us just listening to each others' podcasts. Do a videocast with your MS Pro friends...you could enlist the HSS folks to send in stuff ala viewer contributions...

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I submitted "Home Storage Central". Once MS put the word "server" in the product, it was a tough sell as evidenced from the first series of advertisements.

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Part of the problem is the fickle consumer market. I think when Microsoft killed Drive Extender last year, based on the writings in their WHS team blog, it was very evident that Microsoft was making the decision based on their desire not to hurt the feelings of the business users, since WHS 2011 was tightly coupled (code-wise) with Small Business Server and Storage Server.

 

It was all over the news last week that HP not only killed its tablets and smartphones, but also wants to spin off it's PC division--not the server products, though. Analysts are all saying that HP wants to be more like IBM, which also killed off its consumer product division in favor of focusing on its enterprise level businesses. Along came Lenovo to snap up IBM's PCs; maybe HP's spin-off will be named Compaq.

 

Consumers are a lot more volatile, and quite frankly, consumer products don't make money for companies. HP said in its public statements that while their consumer product division (PCs and printers) was the biggest revenue generator, it's also the least profitable. When people are struggling to make their mortgage and car payments, they're not going to want to drop a small fortune on that shiny new laptop with quad cores, 8 GB of memory and a 2 GB video card...not unless it's got all kinds of big incentives tied to it...kind of like the huge incentives used by car manufacturers to sell cars, but take a loss on every sale.

 

With online backup services available such as Carbonite or Mozy available at such reasonable prices, along with other services such as Dropbox or ZumoDrive, many folks will shy away from the notion of the home server. I think it's sad, but in a lot of ways I think it's the (somewhat harsh) reality.

 

Microsoft really wanted the home server to take off, to get it to be something everybody--not just the geeks--would want in their homes. Unfortunately, it instead became a niche product, embraced by geeks, and brushed off by everyone else. I suggested to my parents that they get one, since they have huge collections of music and pictures. I showed them mine and how easy it was to set up, and it was pretty much ZERO maintenance for them. My mom said it was "too complicated" and that she'd need me to "maintain" it for them. Dare I say "niche product"?

Edited by msawyer91
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  • 2 months later...

Microsoft really wanted the home server to take off, to get it to be something everybody--not just the geeks--would want in their homes. Unfortunately, it instead became a niche product, embraced by geeks, and brushed off by everyone else. I suggested to my parents that they get one, since they have huge collections of music and pictures. I showed them mine and how easy it was to set up, and it was pretty much ZERO maintenance for them. My mom said it was "too complicated" and that she'd need me to "maintain" it for them. Dare I say "niche product"?

 

I definitely agree that Microsoft has not made the most of WHSv1 or 2011. It is an outstanding product, and I think that it could be much more successful if marketed properly.

 

But msawyer is probably correct. The general user doesnt want to have to maintain anything for them. Everyone wants instant access to everything through their smartphones or their laptops. And the thought of buying or building a dedicated computer for a specific task (no matter how great of a benefit it would have), scares too many people.

 

I am OK with WHS remaining a niche product, but only as long as theres enough of us using it to keep Microsoft updating it. I would hate to see it disappear and leaving us in the cold after future releases of Windows become available.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I also think the problem with the WHS is most people never think it will happen to them. Therefore they won't invest in a backup solution until it is too late.

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