Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)
jeffla

wireless G speed on my home network

Recommended Posts

jeffla

So after building a new desktop computer and spending 8 hours before successfully getting the 2011 connector installed, I spent some time reading about wireless network speeds. I am getting lost with all the KB/s vs kb/s talk and was wondering if someone could just tell me if my wifi network speed is acceptable. Here in Minneapolis, MN the entire city is blanketed in a city wide wifi network run by USI Wireless. So Channels 6 & 9 are dominated by them. I live in a very dense urban environment and my laptop can see 15+ wifi networks. I use channel 11 as Tomato reports its the strongest signal.

 

On my desktop computer many walls and 1 floor away from the router, I get 400-500 KB/second (as reported by the Windows 7 copy manager). On our laptops which generally are 5-15 feet from the router, I get 1.1 - 1.6 MB/second.

 

My router is a WRT54GL running Tomato. The wifi cards are whatever brand were built into the laptops and the desktop has an Asus N adapter. We have 1 wifi IP camera on at all times that I'm sure eats some bandwidth.

 

Here is a pic of the windows 7 copy manager coping files from our old desktop backup to a laptop. https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/uN2-w5dr-wbdf8cHHc5xlA?feat=directlink

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ikon

OK, those speeds are low; in fact they're quite low. When you said Tomato showed channel 11 as the strongest, I'm not sure exactly what you mean. Did you use the Wireless Survey feature? It will give you a good idea of what other channels are in use around you and how strong they are. You want to pick the channel that has the lowest number of other networks on it and, as much as possible, the lowest signal level. If you can find a channel where none of the routers using it have a strength of -80db or more (in wireless terms more means -75, -60, -55, etc).then it would likely be a good one to try).

 

In good circumstances you should be able to achieve speeds of 15 - 25 Mbits/sec. using 802.11g.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
timekills

Just by the way, if you were serious about the KB vs kb thing, many people use them incorrectly, even on this site unfortunately. The leading K or M should always be capitalized as it stands for Kilo or Mega. The "b" is the important part. A capital "B" means BYTES whilst a lowercase "b" means BITS. Of course, there are eight (8) bits to a byte, so one MB (megabyte) is the same as 8Mb (megabit).

 

Very, very simply and quickly then, a 10Mb (ten megabit) connection in theory gives 1.25 MB (1.25 megabytes) of data. In reality that's not true due to overhead of both Ethernet and when using WiFi the encryption and packet errors. So if you are getting one megabyte (1 MB) of actual throughput per each 10 megabits (10 Mb) of WiFi speed you're doing very well. In reality you'll likely see only half to 75% of that.

 

As Ikon stated, you should probably expect higher transfer speeds on even 802.11g. However 15-25 Mb (megabits) is roughly equivalent to 1 to 2 MB (megabytes) per second which is pretty much what you're getting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ikon

Just by the way, if you were serious about the KB vs kb thing, many people use them incorrectly, even on this site unfortunately. The leading K or M should always be capitalized as it stands for Kilo or Mega. The "b" is the important part. A capital "B" means BYTES whilst a lowercase "b" means BITS. Of course, there are eight (8) bits to a byte, so one MB (megabyte) is the same as 8Mb (megabit).

 

Very, very simply and quickly then, a 10Mb (ten megabit) connection in theory gives 1.25 MB (1.25 megabytes) of data. In reality that's not true due to overhead of both Ethernet and when using WiFi the encryption and packet errors. So if you are getting one megabyte (1 MB) of actual throughput per each 10 megabits (10 Mb) of WiFi speed you're doing very well. In reality you'll likely see only half to 75% of that.

 

As Ikon stated, you should probably expect higher transfer speeds on even 802.11g. However 15-25 Mb (megabits) is roughly equivalent to 1 to 2 MB (megabytes) per second which is pretty much what you're getting.

Good point about the nomenclature (although I've pretty much given up trying to get people to use it correctly :) )

 

When I said low, I was speaking mostly about the 400-500KB/sec. While not tragic, 4 - 5 Mb/sec, even on 802.11g, is not great.

 

BTW jeffla, there are a couple of 802.11n routers that can run Tomato, and they're not expensive really; one of them is the Netgear WNR3500L which can be bought for $60 or $70. A big advantage of 802.11n for you is that it has better range due to it's multipath technology.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jeffla

yah I used the wireless survey in Tomato and also had it scan which channel to choose. The city wifi uses channels 6 & 9 and they have excellent signal unfortunately with a tower across the street and one at the end of the block. Channel 11 is the only channel none of my neighbors are using. So that's the channel I have used. I've tried channel 1 and the speeds slow down quite a lot. I'll look into a newer N router, will definitely lean towards a tomato compatible router. Would be nice to get one with gigabit ports to connect the home server to the ps3. Although who knows if that would make any difference.

 

Thanks guys.

 

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jmwills

This article is kind of dumbed down for this crowd, but at least worth along.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...