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Do "Active Power Factor Correction (PFC)" efficient power supplies really require a sine wave UPS?


tinkererguy
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8 members have voted

  1. 1. Do "Active Power Factor Correction (PFC)" efficient power supplies really require a sine wave UPS?

    • Yes
      6
    • No
      2


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I recently posted a reply to a relevant old thread in this V1 forum over here, pertaining to Grid Junction:

http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/1019-grid-junction/page__st__20

but I'm now thinking that this new topic, in the more appropriate WHS Builds forum area, is a better location to ask this poll question, and or see other's feedback/comments.

 

Does the UPS choice really matter with new PFC power supply designs?

Edited by tinkererguy
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It is always better and less stressful on a power supply to get the full sine wave UPS as they are less stressful on your powersupply, however in my tests, it worked both ways. My suggestion is that you go with a full sine wave supply and avoid the worries.

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That's what I wound up doing (since it didn't seem to cost much more than the average APC UPS). In my case I had to get a new UPS anyway, so kind of a no brainer. But I didn't want to possibly spread FUD, if there's really no solid technical evidence to backup up CyberPower (and others') claims. Having your take means a lot, given you have far more experience/wisdom under your build with building new systems (this was my first system completely from scratch in a while).

 

I've also used APC and Tripp Lite products over the years as well: I like to have an open mind and broad experience (since I work with a variety of brands in my job).

 

I wrote it up my CyberPower/Antec experience here:

http://tinkertry.com/efficientpowersupplyandups

 

I would have considered other power supply brands as well, if I wasn't so time and $ constrained. But all other choices were either:

a ) way-oversized for my modest needs

b ) overpriced (my cost constraints are serious, but not enough to scrimp so much I'd risk my mobo/CPU combo)

c ) pricing is fickle.

Back in May, I had a certain week to buy (when my day job allowed me the time to tackle this). This Antec had the right # of power connectors and cable lengths I needed, from all of what newegg.com carried back in May 2011. NewEgg's impressive tools, with many configurable options for power supplies, made it easier to spot the best deal, no other specials that week even came close, here's the navigation view I used on newegg.com

 

Also learned that the next time I do a video, I'll use a real HD camcorder, for improved sound, with less hiss, and no cheesy zoom-lever noises (these noises seem to be typical on point and shoot cameras like mine, with convenient 720p YouTube-friendly HD mode).

 

Thank you pcdoc!

Edited by tinkererguy
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This has got me thinking about my recent desktop build with the Corair 750 Gold PSU. It's only connected to an APC BackUPS, which I just confirmed is a stepped approximation type.

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I have been using a CyberPower PR1500LCDRT2U for about 2 years now. It protects my HTPC , WHS 2011 and my Onkyo AVR.

 

It has proved to be very reliable and saved my Bacon on many occasions. We loose power a lot here, and our power coming to the house dosnt seem to be the most stable.

 

The only real Con I have on it is, when I tried to add my Panny Plasma to the mix the fans on the CyberPower spun up and sounded like a Jet Engine. I think it was just drawing too much additional Juice combined with the other devices.

 

Needless to say I had to get a separate UPS for my TV.

 

It is sitting underneath my HTPC in the picture posted below.

 

 

DSC02532.jpg

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Classic!

 

I had similar issues with UPSs in my home theater recently, particularly the sound system (LED LCD TV was the easy part). I can't put the AMP on any UPS: acts kind of like a laser printer (bad idea of course, way too much momentary power draw, UPS cuts off in the most intense Blu-ray action scenes. So instead, I've got my fingers crossed. Yep, hoping my Leviton whole house surge suppression will help me get by. It gets awfully expensive replacing batteries every 2-3 years for a UPS big enough for a decent home theater AMP.

 

But I digress from server-talk...thank you vinylfreak, you always help make visits to the forum fun and interesting!

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Classic!

 

I had similar issues with UPSs in my home theater recently, particularly the sound system (LED LCD TV was the easy part). I can't put the AMP on any UPS: acts kind of like a laser printer (bad idea of course, way too much momentary power draw, UPS cuts off in the most intense Blu-ray action scenes. So instead, I've got my fingers crossed. Yep, hoping my Leviton whole house surge suppression will help me get by. It gets awfully expensive replacing batteries every 2-3 years for a UPS big enough for a decent home theater AMP.

 

But I digress from server-talk...thank you vinylfreak, you always help make visits to the forum fun and interesting!

Yeah, batteries can be a problem. I'm lucky; I have a brother-in-law up in Ottawa who has his own access control business; he gets me batteries at cost.I pick up a bunch when we go up for visits.

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(snip)

Does the UPS choice really matter with new PFC power supply designs?

 

Yes! Absolutely!

 

Active PSU's -- such as what you'll find in most newer desktops or a HP MSS or like what I have in my Main Client require a UPS designed for Active PSU’s. A regular UPS doesn’t have a true sine wave and it could (will eventually IMHO) burn out a Active PSU in short order if you’re not careful. An active PSU will make clicking noises when it’s being supplied by a standard (cheaper) UPS. I orginally discovered this issue when we experienced a power outage -- I went to check on my HP MSS with, at the time, a bargin 1KVA UPS and I heard clicking noises coming from the MSS -- I surmized it was from the MSS PSU which lead to my research into the matter -- I replaced the server UPS for my EX487 with a CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD which is at NewEgg at http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16842102134

 

The older UPS works fine backing up my cable modem and my Dllink DGL-4500 & DGS-2208 plus a few other things downstairs while my CP1500PFCLCD backs up my Server. I bought another CP1500PFCLCD for my main Client.

 

My main client has a COOLER MASTER Silent Pro RS850-AMBAJ3-US 850W ATX12V v2.3 / EPS12V v2.92 SLI Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817171048&Tpk=RS850

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Classic!

 

I had similar issues with UPSs in my home theater recently, particularly the sound system (LED LCD TV was the easy part). I can't put the AMP on any UPS: acts kind of like a laser printer (bad idea of course, way too much momentary power draw, UPS cuts off in the most intense Blu-ray action scenes. So instead, I've got my fingers crossed. Yep, hoping my Leviton whole house surge suppression will help me get by. It gets awfully expensive replacing batteries every 2-3 years for a UPS big enough for a decent home theater AMP.

 

But I digress from server-talk...thank you vinylfreak, you always help make visits to the forum fun and interesting!

 

Thanks! tinkererguy! I do my best. ;)

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Yes! Absolutely!

 

Active PSU's -- such as what you'll find in most newer desktops or a HP MSS or like what I have in my Main Client require a UPS designed for Active PSU’s. A regular UPS doesn’t have a true sine wave and it could (will eventually IMHO) burn out a Active PSU in short order if you’re not careful. An active PSU will make clicking noises when it’s being supplied by a standard (cheaper) UPS. I orginally discovered this issue when we experienced a power outage -- I went to check on my HP MSS with, at the time, a bargin 1KVA UPS and I heard clicking noises coming from the MSS -- I surmized it was from the MSS PSU which lead to my research into the matter -- I replaced the server UPS for my EX487 with a CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD which is at NewEgg at http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16842102134

 

The older UPS works fine backing up my cable modem and my Dllink DGL-4500 & DGS-2208 plus a few other things downstairs while my CP1500PFCLCD backs up my Server. I bought another CP1500PFCLCD for my main Client.

 

My main client has a COOLER MASTER Silent Pro RS850-AMBAJ3-US 850W ATX12V v2.3 / EPS12V v2.92 SLI Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817171048&Tpk=RS850

 

I wonder if this iss the issue I am having with my Samsung LED TV. I have it connected to a APC BR1500LCD 1500VA 865 Watts UPS and recently experienced issues with the power supply on the TV. A couple of weeks ago I had Samsung service come by and replace the switch in the TV. This past week I had the same issue and they replaced the switch and the main board and my wife confirmed the TV was working when they left. I came home, mounted the TV back on the wall, connected the power to the UPS, HDMI cable to my AV receiver and the LAN cable. I turned on the power and the power light lit and instantly went out with the TV making the same clicking /switching noise. They are coming back out to replace the switch and main board on Tuesday...I probably will not plug the TV back into the UPS again.

 

Do you think the issue could be the UPS?

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