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Should I be Worried?


Michael Brown
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I just put my first build ever together. It consists of:

 

GIGABYTE GA-H67A-UD3H-B3 LGA Motherboard

Intel i3-2100 Processor

4 Gig Corsair DDR-1333 CMX2GX3M1A1333C9 Memory

CORSAIR Enthusiast Series TX650 PSU

Antec 300 case

Couple of front case fans along with the two fans that come with the case.

 

I've got two 250 gig WD Scorpios that will go in an Icy Dock Raid 1 for the OS and 4 WD20EADS that I will Raid 5 on a HighPoint RocketRAID 2640X4 controller.

 

I just put the thing together minus the raid controllers and drives. It posts just fine, but the processor fan does not come on. The BIOS shows the processor temp getting up to about 50C. Does the processor have to get to a certain temperature before the fan comes on, or is something wrong with it?

 

Thanks for any help.

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I just put my first build ever together. It consists of:

 

GIGABYTE GA-H67A-UD3H-B3 LGA Motherboard

Intel i3-2100 Processor

4 Gig Corsair DDR-1333 CMX2GX3M1A1333C9 Memory

CORSAIR Enthusiast Series TX650 PSU

Antec 300 case

Couple of front case fans along with the two fans that come with the case.

 

I've got two 250 gig WD Scorpios that will go in an Icy Dock Raid 1 for the OS and 4 WD20EADS that I will Raid 5 on a HighPoint RocketRAID 2640X4 controller.

 

I just put the thing together minus the raid controllers and drives. It posts just fine, but the processor fan does not come on. The BIOS shows the processor temp getting up to about 50C. Does the processor have to get to a certain temperature before the fan comes on, or is something wrong with it?

 

Thanks for any help.

 

 

No, it should have come on right away. I have this processor and mine was spinning right away. Check you cable and connection then try a different 4 pin connector to make sure the MB header is working. I suspect it is not seated correctly.

 

No, it should have come on right away. I have this processor and mine was spinning right away. Check you cable and connection then try a different 4 pin connector to make sure the MB header is working. I suspect it is not seated correctly. It is not the processor but either the fan or motherboard header.

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I also think that the way Intel puts thermal paste on their stock coolers isn't really ideal and if you're smart enough to build your own PC, I'd say you should apply your own so you get a nice even coat. When I removed my heatsink for the first time, I found there were large gaps with no thermal paste. Not that great for thermal transfer!

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No, it should have come on right away. I have this processor and mine was spinning right away. Check you cable and connection then try a different 4 pin connector to make sure the MB header is working. I suspect it is not seated correctly.

 

 

You were correct, Mike. I didn't have it seated properly. It's spinning away now. I just finished disabling the idle timers on my EADS disks and put everything to bed. Now just waiting for WHS 2011 to hit the shelves as I don't have a TechNet subscription.

 

Thanks!

 

I also think that the way Intel puts thermal paste on their stock coolers isn't really ideal and if you're smart enough to build your own PC, I'd say you should apply your own so you get a nice even coat. When I removed my heatsink for the first time, I found there were large gaps with no thermal paste. Not that great for thermal transfer!

 

Mine seemed to be pretty even when I pulled the heatsink. Should I pull it again and re-apply?

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You were correct, Mike. I didn't have it seated properly. It's spinning away now. I just finished disabling the idle timers on my EADS disks and put everything to bed. Now just waiting for WHS 2011 to hit the shelves as I don't have a TechNet subscription.

 

Thanks!

 

 

 

Mine seemed to be pretty even when I pulled the heatsink. Should I pull it again and re-apply?

 

 

In testing I have I done with hot running CPU's, using the right thermal paste with the right application can make as much as 5 degrees C difference. However using the factory heat sink and a low power CPU like the 2100 you will never tell the difference. That CPU under WHS 2011 will run in the low 30s and may climb to the low to mid 40s under load which is more than acceptable for a factory heatsink. Do not just pull off the heatsink again unless you have a problem or unless you have some aftermarket paste to replace it with. It is not good to keep removing and reapplying the same paste. My rule of thumb is if I remove it, I clean off and replace the paste. So unless you feel there is a temp problem, just leave it alone unless you have a tube of arctic silver handy....

 

I also think that the way Intel puts thermal paste on their stock coolers isn't really ideal and if you're smart enough to build your own PC, I'd say you should apply your own so you get a nice even coat. When I removed my heatsink for the first time, I found there were large gaps with no thermal paste. Not that great for thermal transfer!

 

Basically I agree with you which is why I have 4 tubes of Arctic Silver with me at all times, but the reality is that you can only see any difference with high performance CPU's under load. The low to mid seem to be about the same suing the factory paste. At least that is what I have seen over a couple of hundred CPU's. For the high end stuff though you are right on the money.

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In testing I have I done with hot running CPU's, using the right thermal paste with the right application can make as much as 5 degrees C difference. However using the factory heat sink and a low power CPU like the 2100 you will never tell the difference. That CPU under WHS 2011 will run in the low 30s and may climb to the low to mid 40s under load which is more than acceptable for a factory heatsink. Do not just pull off the heatsink again unless you have a problem or unless you have some aftermarket paste to replace it with. It is not good to keep removing and reapplying the same paste. My rule of thumb is if I remove it, I clean off and replace the paste. So unless you feel there is a temp problem, just leave it alone unless you have a tube of arctic silver handy....

 

 

 

Basically I agree with you which is why I have 4 tubes of Arctic Silver with me at all times, but the reality is that you can only see any difference with high performance CPU's under load. The low to mid seem to be about the same suing the factory paste. At least that is what I have seen over a couple of hundred CPU's. For the high end stuff though you are right on the money.

 

I guess so. Mine was horrendously bad though. No way certain areas of the CPU were ever going to be covered in thermal paste. But for most CPUs, it's a "set it and forget it"-type process

Edited by dagamer34
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... which is why I have 4 tubes of Arctic Silver with me at all times,

LOL, I just got an image of you in a sombrero with a bandoleer full of Arctic Silver tubes slung over your shoulder...ready for action! :D

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LOL, I just got an image of you in a sombrero with a bandoleer full of Arctic Silver tubes slung over your shoulder...ready for action! :D

 

You nailed it. I have holsters for them so I draw quick...

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