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geek-accountant
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OK, now that we know there are a number of photographers on this site, how about a thread related to images. Several people have mentioned they take HDR images and this is something I have been into over the last year or so.

 

Here are a few of my recent HDR images:

 

hdr1.jpg

 

hdr2.jpg

 

hdr3.jpg

 

 

I was using Photomatix to process my HDR images but recently switched to Nik Software's HDR Efex Pro. Both are good products, I just like how Nik is better integrated into Lightroom. What software do you use to process your HDR images?

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So Apple didn't invent and revolutionize HDR with the iPhone 4? ha ha

 

Ok, i need to stay out of your forum huh? Those shots are awesome!

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No, Apple didn't invent or revolutionize HDR. :) I don't have an iPhone, but if it's anything like the app on my Andriod, I'm not sure I would call that "real" HDR.

 

Please come and post in here as often as possible, I would love to keep talking about photography. Although, you know this is just keeping me from finishing my articles. I really need to kick myself in the butt and get them finished because I have a couple more ideas for articles after the super router series and I am not going to work on them until I am done with the others.

 

Thanks for the comment on the shots. The top one was a winner in a local photo contest and is currently framed and on display at our City Hall.

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Indylux posted his HDR pano in another thread and commented that it contained 9 images. While this was a pano which requires more than one image to begin with, I was wondering how many iamges everyone else typically shoots for their HDR images. I have done many with 3 images, but recently have switched to 5. While different scenes may require more or less, I am not sure there is a "right" answer here, just curious what others normally do.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Indylux posted his HDR pano in another thread and commented that it contained 9 images. While this was a pano which requires more than one image to begin with, I was wondering how many iamges everyone else typically shoots for their HDR images. I have done many with 3 images, but recently have switched to 5. While different scenes may require more or less, I am not sure there is a "right" answer here, just curious what others normally do.

I was wondering about Indylux's post too; it seemed like an awful lot of shots to make a pano. He clarified it; the shot is HDR AND pano, it's really 3 frames wide x 3 exposures of each frame. Makes a lot more sense.

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OK, now that we know there are a number of photographers on this site, how about a thread related to images. Several people have mentioned they take HDR images and this is something I have been into over the last year or so.

 

Here are a few of my recent HDR images:

 

I was using Photomatix to process my HDR images but recently switched to Nik Software's HDR Efex Pro. Both are good products, I just like how Nik is better integrated into Lightroom. What software do you use to process your HDR images?

Very impressive. Thank you for posting those shots. I was delighted to see that you used HDR to make the shots look much more like what a person standing there would experience with their eyes; IOW, you made the photos look the way people would remember the scenes. IMHO, this is the essence of HDR. You didn't go way overboard with the tone mapping, something that happens so often I think it's giving HDR a bad reputation with the public in general.

 

I'm just starting into HDR. I've known about it for decades, but before the advent of digital it was extremely difficult & expensive to do.

 

My goal is to create multi-row HDR panos (e.g. 30-40 deg up-tilt, 0 tilt, 30-40 deg down-tilt x 3 exposures for each frame (-2, 0, +2) x 5 frames wide or so for each pano, making a total of 45 exposures per pano. This would have taken weeks or months using film, and would have cost a bomb. Now I suspect it can be done in hours to days, and way way cheaper.

 

I suspect I'll be picking your brain often :rolleyes:

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hdr2.jpg

 

I have a question already about this shot. I have to first emphasize that my question is in NO way intended as a criticism. I think it's a great shot, and a beautiful example of what HDR can be. However, I'm just wondering how much complexity you think it would add to do post-processing perspective correction of the building. If you were trying to do it, at what point in the process would you do it, near the beginning, right at the end, elsewhere?

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I think you should do it after all the HDR frames are brought together. That way you don't have to worry about causing issues by doing each frame separably, plus it means you only need to do it to one frame.

 

This was taken with my 12-24mm lens and at the wide end it can cause lots of distortion, especially if the angle of the lens is just right or wrong for that matter. In this photo, I should have fixed the distortion since it doesn't add anything to the image and actually takes away from it.

 

Along with many other issues, I have always had an issue with cropping. Maybe it comes from trying to get the image dimensions right for print sizing or from seeing other people crop real tight on a sports image and then a parent wants a large print of that image and the small crop can not support it. While all those are good reasons, I seem to have taken it too far to the point of never cropping. So, I need to be a little more liberal with my cropping, which the above image could have used in the form of distortion correction.

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I think you should do it after all the HDR frames are brought together. That way you don't have to worry about causing issues by doing each frame separably, plus it means you only need to do it to one frame.

 

This was taken with my 12-24mm lens and at the wide end it can cause lots of distortion, especially if the angle of the lens is just right or wrong for that matter. In this photo, I should have fixed the distortion since it doesn't add anything to the image and actually takes away from it.

 

Along with many other issues, I have always had an issue with cropping. Maybe it comes from trying to get the image dimensions right for print sizing or from seeing other people crop real tight on a sports image and then a parent wants a large print of that image and the small crop can not support it. While all those are good reasons, I seem to have taken it too far to the point of never cropping. So, I need to be a little more liberal with my cropping, which the above image could have used in the form of distortion correction.

I'm much like you re: cropping. It comes from the pro's I studied with when I was starting out (you know, the days of glass plates and daguerrotypes :) ).

 

Thanks for the tip; I think it makes perfect sense to correct once everything else is done. And, while it might be interesting to see that shot corrected, it is nonetheless a great shot... you should be proud of it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

HDR, when done with moderation is just awesome!

 

I try not to overdo it, I want to make it look as close as possible to the real subject.

I really don't like the "cartoon" look, but once in a while for some reason a cartoony HDR just captures my attention.

 

Here's a few of my HDRs

 

Taken at the Submarine Force Library Museum in Norfolk, VA5741907334_5c9b163d0c_b.jpg

 

 

 

 

USS North Carolina in Wilmington, NC

5724974292_9fcdaf8e31_b.jpg

Edited by Silvio
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