Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)

Best method to create a WHS2011 bootable client restore (recovery) bootable USB key (from the iso file)?


tinkererguy
 Share

Recommended Posts

A recent lesson I learned when doing a test WHS2011 restore was that this ISO to USB creation utility from Microsoft:

http://www.intowindows.com/how-to-create-bootable-windows-7-usb-to-install-windows-7-from-usb-flash-drive-using-windows-7-dvdusb-tool/

doesn't work for the WHS2011 client restore CD called:

en_client_restore_disc_windows_home_server_2011_x86_x64_cd_658475.iso

The exact message says:

"The selected file is not a valid ISO file. Please select a valid ISO file and try again."

 

so I went ahead and used an empty 32GB USB key, and used UltraISO 9.3 "Make Disk" feature and chose "USB-HDD+" option which worked great, although more traditional (free) techniques involving the command line and diskpart commands probably work fine as well, I just didn't test those.

 

Anybody else test the diskpart or other free methods, if so, what exact sequence of steps worked for you?

 

Footnote: a nice thing with the 64 bit based boot option is that Intel ICH9 RAID drivers were finally built right in, as was a longer list of NICs supported: so for me, the manual driver downloads to a custom USB recovery key (as I had done with WHSv1) are no longer necessary with WHS2011.

Edited by tinkererguy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A recent lesson I learned when doing a test WHS2011 restore was that this ISO to USB creation utility from Microsoft:

http://www.intowindows.com/how-to-create-bootable-windows-7-usb-to-install-windows-7-from-usb-flash-drive-using-windows-7-dvdusb-tool/

doesn't work for the WHS2011 client restore CD called:

en_client_restore_disc_windows_home_server_2011_x86_x64_cd_658475.iso

The exact message says:

"The selected file is not a valid ISO file. Please select a valid ISO file and try again."

 

so I went ahead and used an empty 32GB USB key, and used UltraISO 9.3 "Make Disk" feature and chose "USB-HDD+" option which worked great, although more traditional (free) techniques involving the command line and diskpart commands probably work fine as well, I just didn't test those.

 

Anybody else test the diskpart or other free methods, if so, what exact sequence of steps worked for you?

 

Footnote: a nice thing with the 64 bit based boot option is that Intel ICH9 RAID drivers were finally built right in, as was a longer list of NICs supported: so for me, the manual driver downloads to a custom USB recovery key (as I had done with WHSv1) are no longer necessary with WHS2011.

 

 

 

This feature is built in to WHS 2011. If you go to the computers and backup tab, select "additional client computer backup tasks", select "tools" and you can create a quick recovery USB key.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This feature is built in to WHS 2011. If you go to the computers and backup tab, select "additional client computer backup tasks", select "tools" and you can create a quick recovery USB key.

 

Uh, I guess I should have read the manual, eh? Maybe I like the old way / the hard way ;-)

http://www.wegotserved.com/2008/04/30/turn-your-usb-flash-drive-into-a-windows-install-disk/

 

Thank you pcdoc, will give that a try! I wonder if that makes a USB key that is identical to the method I documented, or just has a subset of drivers needed for the particular machine making the USB key though, hmmm, time to do some more googling or testing...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This feature is built in to WHS 2011. If you go to the computers and backup tab, select "additional client computer backup tasks", select "tools" and you can create a quick recovery USB key.

 

Have you tested this yet? I've yet to get a machine to boot off of this USB key erroring out with an NDLTR error (I think it's been awhile since I've tried). The worst part is the USB key doesn't show up in My Computer after using it for this purpose and the only way I can use the key again is use Diskpart to clean and format the drive.

 

To the OP. Yes I use the Diskpart function all the time to make USB boot drives. Once the drive is made in Diskpart just extract the files (using 7zip or your zip tool of choice) of the ISO and copy the files to the USB key. Works like a charm every time. I would warn you that if you are using a USB key larger than 4gig to format the drive using NTFS instead of FAT32.

 

fasthair

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice one PCDoc I think Tim mentioned this to me and I completely forgot about it!

 

I've used Diskpart here's my walkthrough:

 

 

1. Plug in your USB drive

 

 

2. Go to Start -> Run, type cmd hit enter. That should bring in the command prompt. (I hope you are running as an adminstrator)

 

3. Type

 

diskpart

list disk

 

The number of your USB drive will listed. You’ll need this for the next step. I’ll assume that the USB flash drive is disk 3.

 

4. Now type and execute these steps one by one

 

select disk 3

clean

create partition primary

select partition 1

active

format fs=NTFS

assign

exit

 

That will just to make your disk formatted and ready with partitions.

 

5. Insert your Windows Vista / 7 DVD into your drive.

 

6. Change directory to the DVD’s boot directory where bootsect lives:

 

d:

cd d:\boot

 

7. Use bootsect to set the USB as a bootable NTFS drive prepared for a Vista/7 image. I’m assuming that your USB flash drive has

been labeled disk G:\ by the computer. So,

 

bootsect /nt60 g:

 

You can now close the command prompt window.

 

8. Now you need to copy the installation DVD to your USB drive. The best way to do it is to use Windows Explorer and that will copy

all the files to your USB drive.

 

9. Now set up your BIOS to boot from USB. and you are done.

 

Enjoy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice one PCDoc I think Tim mentioned this to me and I completely forgot about it!

 

I've used Diskpart here's my walkthrough:

 

 

1. Plug in your USB drive

 

 

2. Go to Start -> Run, type cmd hit enter. That should bring in the command prompt. (I hope you are running as an adminstrator)

 

3. Type

 

diskpart

list disk

 

The number of your USB drive will listed. You’ll need this for the next step. I’ll assume that the USB flash drive is disk 3.

 

4. Now type and execute these steps one by one

 

select disk 3

clean

create partition primary

select partition 3

active

format fs=NTFS

assign

exit

 

That will just to make your disk formatted and ready with partitions.

 

5. Insert your Windows Vista / 7 DVD into your drive.

 

6. Change directory to the DVD’s boot directory where bootsect lives:

 

d:

cd d:\boot

 

7. Use bootsect to set the USB as a bootable NTFS drive prepared for a Vista/7 image. I’m assuming that your USB flash drive has

been labeled disk G:\ by the computer. So,

 

bootsect /nt60 g:

 

You can now close the command prompt window.

 

8. Now you need to copy the installation DVD to your USB drive. The best way to do it is to use Windows Explorer and that will copy

all the files to your USB drive.

 

9. Now set up your BIOS to boot from USB. and you are done.

 

Enjoy.

 

 

Hey, just because I can never get a restore to work does not mean I don't know how.... :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...