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Ready to throw my Wife's PC out the window


geek-accountant
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Yeah. Hahaha... Sob, sob...

 

I do like CD's idea about resetting the motherboard to optimized defaults, if that isn't a problem for you. MSI? My mobo is a Gigagyte. I think we should both move over to Asus or Intel. :P

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Have not tried yet. Since I had the PC tied up a good part of the day, I stopped so my wife could get on it for a bit. Once she is done, I will give it a try. However, i don't have much hope since I think the issue is even before the OS is loaded.

Is she using the old network port now? If she is then the cable that is plugged into it is good enough to make a connection on the new card. If I was guessing I would say that there is an interrupt conflict between the new NIC and the motherboard.

 

DVN - problems like you are describing are symptomatic of ESD damage in electronics. No one likes to hear that but all the guys who swear they have been tearing apart their PC for years with no ESD mat or ground straps and have never had a problem just don't understand that an ESD discharge doesn't have to been seen or felt to do damage.

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Understood. You're right, I don't use an ESD strap. But I generally grab the case before I touch anything inside. Still, I suppose it could have happened. Intermittent, eh? Those are the worst.

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Since this is my last day of vacation, I decided to get a few network things done (plus wrap up Part 2 of my Super Router article). One of the things I wanted to do was replace my wife's 300gig drive with a RAID 0 setup using two 500gig drives. Before I do that, I wanted to replace her Intel 10/100 NIC with an Intel Pro/1000 NIC and back her machine up to my newly installed SBS-E machine. This should be EXTREMELY simple. Just pull out the old card, insert the new one and plug in the cable. Well, 3 hours later and I still can't get the network card to work. I have a bunch of these so I have tried 3 different ones. MB is using the latest firmware and the Win7 machine has no trouble seeing the NIC and loading the drivers. However, it can never make a connection.

 

When the machine is turned off and I plug the network cable into the NIC, the lights turn solid green. No blinking. Plug the cable into the onboad NIC or the 10/100 NIC and they blink fine. Turn on the PC and the lights blink a bit then both of them go off for a couple of seconds and then back on, blink and then back off. I have tried with the onboard disabled in BIOS, removed the the 10/100 NIC, unplugged the cable at the main switch and tried both PCI slots. None of it makes any difference. At this point, I am going to remove the MSI motherboard in the machine and go buy a new Gigabyte one and see if that solves the problem. Things like this drive me nuts, a simple install of a NIC card taking hours!!

 

Before I head off and get a new MB, anyone have any ideas or obvious things I might have over looked?

 

 

Just a wild shot in the dark, but did you make your own cables and did you try a new cable?

 

Yes, that's kinda what I was getting at. If you can get on the Internet that'd narrow it down for you.

 

You think you have problems? This is what I came home to today. Yikes! :unsure: Had to power off and pull the plug for 10 seconds to get it to boot up. This is my desktop PC with a new Icy Dock 2-in-1 2.5" - 3.5" enclosure for the OS drive. This is the same one that Dave reviewed. I could blame in on the enclosure, but I'm beginning to think my mobo is not as stable as I expected it to be. This is a mobo I bought about 4 months ago, and I've had little annoyances like this a few too many times now. I just may go back to my 680i if this kind of stuff keeps occurring.

 

IMG_0053.JPG

 

 

Well you were looking for a use for that tax return anyway. Repeat after me, SANDY BRIDGE....

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Well you were looking for a use for that tax return anyway. Repeat after me, SANDY BRIDGE....

You BYOB guys are always after me Lucky Charms. . .er, I mean coming up with ways for me to spend money! :) The problem is, I think I'd need to jump all the way to a 2600 to justify leaving my Q9550.

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In this case, the cable is not one I made. It runs from my basement utility room where all my network equipment is, up through a hole that runs from the attic to the basement used by the A/C unit in the attic for a drain line (this was a nice find when I was looking for ways to run cable to my wife's office). Replacing this cable would be an involved task.

 

I decided to install the Intel NIC's in my two son's computers, both of which are also on the second floor. They feed into a gig switch that also is used by their Xbox360 and the Tivo in that room. Except for the room to that room, all of these are using pre-made cables. First son's computer installed like it should, longest part of the install was the shut down and rebooting of the computer, just like when I installed it in my PC. His onboard NIC was a Realtec gig version, while my Wife was using a Intel 10/100 NIC card. So at this point, I was again suspecting the motherboard in my Wife's computer.

 

Then I installed the next card in my other son's computer. CRAP!! It is getting the same results as my wife's computer! WTC!!! I decided to download the Intel driver utility which when I ran it said I didn't have an Intel NIC installed. Of course Windows sees it as an Intel Pro/1000 GT Desktop Adapter.

 

So at this point, I do not think it is the motherboard. Also, I noticed when installing the card in my son's computer that worked, the lights on the card just stay light (ie, no blinking) when the machine is turned off. Therefore, my earlier theory about this being an indication of something being wrong, was wrong.

 

Next step is to download and burn a Ubuntu Live DVD and give that a try.

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Using the Diskpart Commands, format to FAT 32 (I would think for Linux) and copy the iso image to the drive.

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Using the Diskpart Commands, format to FAT 32 (I would think for Linux) and copy the iso image to the drive.

OK, so nothing really special then, basic USB boot procedure.

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