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Methods of ripping DVD and Blu-Ray


Dave
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I find it interesting that most of you are using AnyDVD and My Movies..

 

While I always pay for software, I'm nervous about buying software used to remove copy protection.. Even if they are off-shore, your name is undoubtedly in a list somewhere..

 

I was very interested in My Movies as well, until I learned of the online database of all your movies that wasn't optional.. call me paranoid, but it seems an easy target for the MPAA

 

Is it really so paranoid? I mean the RIAA sued a 12 year old girl..

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I find it interesting that most of you are using AnyDVD and My Movies..

 

While I always pay for software, I'm nervous about buying software used to remove copy protection.. Even if they are off-shore, your name is undoubtedly in a list somewhere..

 

I was very interested in My Movies as well, until I learned of the online database of all your movies that wasn't optional.. call me paranoid, but it seems an easy target for the MPAA

 

Is it really so paranoid? I mean the RIAA sued a 12 year old girl..

 

Last I heard it was legal to backup movies you own? Has this changed?

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Last I heard it was legal to backup movies you own? Has this changed?

It's legal to have backup copies, it's just not legal to break the encryption on the disk, which is necessary to do to create the backup copies. At least in the US.

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It's legal to have backup copies, it's just not legal to break the encryption on the disk, which is necessary to do to create the backup copies. At least in the US.

 

That is correct. I'm of the opinion that as long as I backup my media and keep it for me I'm not in trouble. It would appear that they would be looking for the poeple whom are sharing their media after break the encryption. Is it illegal to copy via AnyDVD...probably.

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It's legal to have backup copies, it's just not legal to break the encryption on the disk, which is necessary to do to create the backup copies. At least in the US.

 

That is certainly one interpretation of the DMCA. However, there really hasn't been a serious challenge of that law. I'm of the opinion that it wouldn't hold up to legal challenge.

 

Full disclaimer: I am dead against the stealing of content. However, I am 100% in the opinion that, when I purchase the disk, I have purchased the content for my personal use and can use it for my personal use as I see fit. This whole concept that I just rent it or have certain permissions is total BS.

 

Keith

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It's legal to have backup copies, it's just not legal to break the encryption on the disk, which is necessary to do to create the backup copies. At least in the US.

Exacty. It's not illegal in many other countries. In this respect US law is somewhat onerously strict.

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Exacty. It's not illegal in many other countries. In this respect US law is somewhat onerously strict.

Local rules are trumped by the rules of the copyright owner. For example, just because you live in <generic far-away foreign land with no copyright laws> doesn't mean that you can download movies off the 'net. The copyright for that content exists in the US and there is an understanding of cross-border copyright ownership.

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