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PC as home server


jdmoet
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Hi,

I have a pc running with an Intel  i5 3470k processor running win 10 with a Radeon HD 7800 GPU and 16gb ram. It has 3 internal drives (total 2TB) and a connected 500g hard drive. On a separate 550gb ssd drive in the computer I have a Linux Zorin 16 installation.

 

I am thinking of building a newer computer and using this one as a server.

 

But I'm not sure if

  1. I need to install specialist server software or can use either win 10 or Ubuntu?
  2. Do I need to wipe the drives or can I access the information already on there after it is connected and configured to the router (BT homehub)?
  3. Is it simpler to just invest in a NAS and put the hard drives (different sizes) in there?

 

Many Thanks for any advice.

JD

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My 'Server' is running Windows 10 these days, just with the Hyper-V feature installed.

Means you don't need to mess with drivers and if needs be you can use it as a spare machine..

 

 

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Thanks @tr0gd0r for the reply.

 

Can I keep the data on the Hard drives? Then access from anywhere in the house?

Do you know if this will allow me to access the My server via the internet by using the Hyper V feature?

 

Thanks.

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Do you have a backup, what file system are the drives?
If you are moving from *nix to Windows then you might have to do something with data, moving it around drive by drive, depends on how much spare space you have and how that space is presented.

 

There are many ways to access your data from the Internet, depends what your actual usage is.

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The striking figure in your specification is 2TB of data.

With such a small amount you have no need of a server, indeed configuring such only complicates matters.

(Of course many *cough, cough* on this forum find it fun to experiment with complications!)

 

The difficulty with any system upgrade is where to park the data before the upgrade ...

... for which I have found an HDD docking station a useful device.

StarTech.com Dual-Bay USB 3.0 to SATA and IDE Hard Drive Docking Station, USB Hard Drive Dock, External 2.5/3.5" SATA III / IDE, SSD/HDD Docking Station, Hot-Swap Drive Bays, Top-Loading (UNIDOCKU33) : Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories

 

Second job then: buy a 4TB bare drive and copy all your data to this disk in the dock onto a Windows GPT partition formatted as NTFS. Now you can hack around without worrying about data loss.

 

Rebuild all OS's on the SSD drive and reinstall applications.

 

Buy two more 4TB drives and install them inside the PC case as simple disks (you could use RAID ... but if the disks remain simple then each can be removed from the PC and inserted into the dock for reading on any Windows PC).

Synchronise data between the two, so that if the main disk fails, you have immediate access to data on the second.

 

Now that you have 2 copies of your data in the PC ... use the disk in the dock as target for Windows File History q.v. ... and as an off-site backup - put the dock and disk in the garage between backup runs!

 

I chose 4TB because it is twice your current need.

As time passes you can easily upgrade to 8TB, 16TB ... and there will probably be 32TB by the time you want it. 

 

If you really want a new PC, then the first stop is still to secure the data.

Sell the old PC or donate it to charity.

Best make sure the new case has 4 HDD bays (8 is better still).

Now your OS's will be running on an NVME boot drive, rather than SATA.

 

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On 8/8/2022 at 7:56 PM, Trig0r said:

Do you have a backup, what file system are the drives?
If you are moving from *nix to Windows then you might have to do something with data, moving it around drive by drive, depends on how much spare space you have and how that space is presented.

 

There are many ways to access your data from the Internet, depends what your actual usage is.

I do have a backup, and I am using win 10, but plan to put a copy of Ubuntu onto a spare ssd I have. Then I want to use this as a server, then build a newer computer for my everyday use.

 

Best wishes.

JD

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On 8/10/2022 at 9:54 AM, JackoUK said:

The striking figure in your specification is 2TB of data.

With such a small amount you have no need of a server, indeed configuring such only complicates matters.

(Of course many *cough, cough* on this forum find it fun to experiment with complications!)

 

The difficulty with any system upgrade is where to park the data before the upgrade ...

... for which I have found an HDD docking station a useful device.

StarTech.com Dual-Bay USB 3.0 to SATA and IDE Hard Drive Docking Station, USB Hard Drive Dock, External 2.5/3.5" SATA III / IDE, SSD/HDD Docking Station, Hot-Swap Drive Bays, Top-Loading (UNIDOCKU33) : Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories

 

Second job then: buy a 4TB bare drive and copy all your data to this disk in the dock onto a Windows GPT partition formatted as NTFS. Now you can hack around without worrying about data loss.

 

Rebuild all OS's on the SSD drive and reinstall applications.

 

Buy two more 4TB drives and install them inside the PC case as simple disks (you could use RAID ... but if the disks remain simple then each can be removed from the PC and inserted into the dock for reading on any Windows PC).

Synchronise data between the two, so that if the main disk fails, you have immediate access to data on the second.

 

Now that you have 2 copies of your data in the PC ... use the disk in the dock as target for Windows File History q.v. ... and as an off-site backup - put the dock and disk in the garage between backup runs!

 

I chose 4TB because it is twice your current need.

As time passes you can easily upgrade to 8TB, 16TB ... and there will probably be 32TB by the time you want it. 

 

If you really want a new PC, then the first stop is still to secure the data.

Sell the old PC or donate it to charity.

Best make sure the new case has 4 HDD bays (8 is better still).

Now your OS's will be running on an NVME boot drive, rather than SATA.

 

Hi JackoUK, thanks for the detailed response.

 

Some of it doesn't make sense at the moment, but I will review your comments to help my understanding.

 

Correct me if I'm wrong, but you seem to be suggesting that instead of building a completely new computer (and using this old one as a server), I buy the dock, put all my information on there and use that as the server?

 

I have a couple immediate questions.

 

- Windows GPT partition formatted as NTFS - how big would you advise for the partition?

- Synchronise data between the two, so that if the main disk fails  - If I have a back-up disk in my computer. Why do I need the dock?

- use the disk in the dock as target for Windows File History q.v - I'm not sure what this means!

 

May Thanks

JD

 

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4 hours ago, jdmoet said:

I do have a backup, and I am using win 10, but plan to put a copy of Ubuntu onto a spare ssd I have. Then I want to use this as a server, then build a newer computer for my everyday use.

 

Best wishes.

JD

 

Personally, I've stuck to Windows 10 for my 'Server', because if the machine dies its still pretty easy to get my data off of the drives because they're all still NTFS which makes recovering stuff easier for me, especially as I've never really played with *nix stuff outside of a few production servers 8/10 years ago.

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