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Surveillance-class drives in servers for use with Drive Pool or Drive Bender?


oj88
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I know that NAS drives would be best-suited, but humor me anyway.

 

Looking beyond the fact that the Seagate Skyhawk and WD Purple drives are surveillance HDDs, is there any compelling technical reason why these can't be used for 24x7 light-duty drive-pool use at home? Is there anything in these drives that makes them incapable or unreliable for use other than in surveillance applications?

 

How about using them with Synology SHR? Anyone tried that?

 

Their lower price tag is hard to ignore.

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I've got a purple in my server, hasn't thrown any issues so far..

I think in systems where you are using single drives of any make/model you aren't constrained by the same parameters as you would be if you were mixing and matching on a RAID array or something like that..

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I have only had one experience with surveillance drives in a huge RAID5 config and although it worked fine for backup purposes (which is what the NAS was used for), restore and read performance was poor compared to a NAS with “normal” drives.
Not unusable, just notably slower.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  • Dave changed the title to Surveillance-class drives in servers for use with Drive Pool or Drive Bender?

Good topic.

I realize I have always avoided using surveillance drives, but now that I think abut it, I don't have a good reason why. In the past I had used hardware RAID controllers and always used NAS drives that supported TLER. NAS drives are optimized for random read/write, surveillance drives are optimized for sequential read/write. In a drive pooling system traditional NAS drives would likely perform better for traditional work loads. Surveillance drives may have an advantage with drive pooling when storing media, large files where sequential read and write are required. 

I guess I need to be more open minded about researching drives by usage! 

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I can live with a marginally slower performance across the board. What I am worried about is what sort of voodoo magic did the engineers do to make these drives optimized for surveillance use. To be precise, they have this marketing term called "AllFrame AI", which, suffice to say, makes the drive better at its job in an NVR environment. What's the possibility of this "AllFrame AI" interfering when used in a non-NVR specific equipment?

 

Another thing... these drives are designed to have a load/unload cycle max of 300,000. I would imagine that in a NVR with continuous recording, the drives would be actively writing 24x7, which should prevent the heads from parking. However, when you use it as an ordinary drive, which translates to less active read/write usage, will these drives self-park their heads after being idle for a while? If yes, that would really eat up the load/unload cycle, doesn't it?

 

All that is conjecture and that should give you an idea how much thought (and over-thinking) I'm giving this. ;) 

 

 

 

 

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