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RAID in WHS 2011


fblittle
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To me I measure it by whether or not the array is in the controller (even if it uses the CPU for parity) and can be moved. Another words, If I blow the OS, my array is still intact and can be moved or ported to another system or OS without risk of data loss. Software cannot really offer me that. Granted a hardware card with its own CPU is faster, it is not necessarily much different in terms of how it handles the array.

 

You are more and more guiding me towards building a WHS 2011 with a Raid card...I would probably go with the 2680 like you mentioned. I have started to do some research on Raid to at least be familiar with it...can't go into this blind.

 

Two questions in regards to the 2680

1. Can I install eight drives into one array? ie 8 x 2TB for 16TB with XXTb of actual storage?

2. If I start with 5 x 2TB drives could I later add another drive to increase the storate or do I need to start with the hiher number as outlined in question 1?

 

Thanks, Tim

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If anything, the disperate nature of the hardware RAID controller market only highlights the complexity involved. When you start leveraging hardware RAID controllers and more than 2 drives in your array, how confident are you in your skills that if you encounter a hardware problem, you will be able to recover?

 

@JediTim, while many controllers offer online expansion, that only means that you can add drives and expand the size of the physical space available on the array. To the best of my knowledge, Windows has yet to offer the ability to expand the size of a partition on that array without the use of 3rd party software. Even so, you could still end up with data loss.

 

My best advice to those looking to purchase RAID solutions is to be practical. Think about how much data storage you will need in about 3-5 years, then go out and purchase your RAID solution that will meet those needs. I would also keep the number of drives to a minimum. The more drives you have in your array, the better chance you have that at least one of them will fail. I would even buy a spare drive up front so that you always have one on hand.

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If anything, the disperate nature of the hardware RAID controller market only highlights the complexity involved. When you start leveraging hardware RAID controllers and more than 2 drives in your array, how confident are you in your skills that if you encounter a hardware problem, you will be able to recover?

 

@JediTim, while many controllers offer online expansion, that only means that you can add drives and expand the size of the physical space available on the array. To the best of my knowledge, Windows has yet to offer the ability to expand the size of a partition on that array without the use of 3rd party software. Even so, you could still end up with data loss.

 

My best advice to those looking to purchase RAID solutions is to be practical. Think about how much data storage you will need in about 3-5 years, then go out and purchase your RAID solution that will meet those needs. I would also keep the number of drives to a minimum. The more drives you have in your array, the better chance you have that at least one of them will fail. I would even buy a spare drive up front so that you always have one on hand.

That is why I asked the question...I have 4TB of video now and can easily see it more than doubling. I have a question out on the MyMovies forum in regards to the need for Raid...I'll see what the response is.

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Then you should plan on building a RAID array consisting of either 4-5 3TB HDD's or consider breaking up the video into smaller more manageable arrays.

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@JediTim, while many controllers offer online expansion, that only means that you can add drives and expand the size of the physical space available on the array. To the best of my knowledge, Windows has yet to offer the ability to expand the size of a partition on that array without the use of 3rd party software. Even so, you could still end up with data loss.

 

Just to be pedantic, NTFS is able to extend volumes using the "diskpart" utility, or the disk management tool. More info in the following links.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/325590

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/tutorial133.html

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That is why I asked the question...I have 4TB of video now and can easily see it more than doubling. I have a question out on the MyMovies forum in regards to the need for Raid...I'll see what the response is.

 

A couple wasy you can go. Do as no-control stated or look for sale and get 2T drives. 6 of them would get you 10T or 5 would get you 8T. You can also do a combo and put 4 2T in there now, then when you run out of space, use the extra connectors and add one more array or 4 drives later.

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