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Once upon a time in WHS land.....


ikon
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Once upon a time there lived a homely geek who was enamoured of his WHS. He loved it so much he thought he would save disk space on his everyday desktop computer (and eliminate the need for a second data drive altogether) by relocating his MY DOCUMENTS folder to a shared folder on his beloved WHS. So he intoned the magic incantation and his documents were RELOCATEd. He gazed at the result of his magical prowess and he was happy.

 

Unfortunately, the homely geek was not possessed of a gifted mind, seeing only the immediate rewards in front of him. And so he lived in bliss for a time, backing up his precious documents from his WHS to an eSATA 4-bay enclosure. "All is well in my data world", he thought.

 

Little did he know the error of his ways. Seeing only what was in front of him, he had forgotten to implore Hexadecimal, the Goddess of computing, to bless his efforts. She had been observing his feeble feats of computing magic and was much displeased by his sense of pride, over-confidence, and lack of humility.

 

She vowed to take her revenge for his lack of subservience and obedience to her majesty. And so did she, in a fit of spite and anger, cause one of the drives in his precious WHS to start failing... slowly.

 

Soon, his everyday computer began to run slowly and erratically. His precious WHS too began to behave in odd ways, often freezing up and refusing to allow him entry to the alter of the HOME SERVER CONSOLE.

 

The homely geek dispaired of his plight. What was happening to his desktop computer, yea, even to his precious WHS? He poured over log files, looked for even the tiniest clue within the revered HOME SERVER CONSOLE, and thought and thought, all to no avail. Like a beggar in the town square, he was reduced to taking what he could and reluctantly fell upon forcefully shutting down his beloved WHS and rebooting it.

 

He cringed in fear each time he pressed the button of power for the cryptic four seconds that caused his precious WHS to slip into a coma. After a short time he would press the button of power to once again awaken his WHS from its slumbers. Sometimes, it awoke fully and granted him access to the HOME SERVER CONSOLE. Sometimes, it only roused partly awake, and although it was content to reply to PING requests, it ignored all other pleas. And always, after a mere few hours, or as long as a still unpromising day or two, the freezeup would return.

 

His countenance became haggard, his mood foul. Why was this happening to him? He had no riches, was not possessed of a handsome countenance, had no artistic talent of any note; could he not be permitted this one thing, a steadfast and loyal computing environment?

 

Finally, in desperation, he pleaded, nay prayed, to the Goddess Hexadecimal to relieve him of his suffering. Hexadecimal was moved by his contriteness and relented... a little. In her infinite wisdom she decided to permit the homely geek just enough knowledge to help him out of his plight. She had not been totally mollified by his pleas.

 

Nevertheless, she placed into his mind a thought, a mere whisper; look for an Add-in that can provide more information about WHS. The homely geek brightened a little as the whisper guided his mind to a memory of an interview with the sage who developed a hard drive monitoring Add-in for the revered WHS. He traveled through the ether to the oracle, http://www.homeservershow.com. There, he consulted the anals of the Home Server Show Podcast and eventually came upon a name: Tentacle Software.

 

With his new-found knowledge he again traveled the ether, this time to http://www.tentaclesoftware.com. There he was presented with a wondrous site: DISK MANAGEMENT FOR WINDOWS HOME SERVER. He intoned the appropriate incantation and the essence of the Add-in was spirited to the SOFTWARE share on his WHS, which was responding favourably at that moment.

 

Quickly, before the dreaded freezeup could return, he invoked the HOME SERVER CONSOLE. Frantically, he navigated to the portal of Settings, and thence to the repository of Add-ins. Nervously, he clicked the prominent INSTALL button for DISK MANAGEMENT FOR WINDOWS HOME SERVER. The HOME SERVER CONSOLE informed him the Add-in had been installed with success. He said a quick prayer of thanks to Hexadecimal. She noted his prayer and decided his penance was sufficient to permit him to proceed.

 

The homely geek swiftly restarted the HOME SERVER CONSOLE and clicked on the DISK MANAGEMENT icon. It presented him with a etching of the disk drives in his beloved WHS. He scanned eagerly to find the mysterious S.M.A.R.T. settings; alas, to no avail. The only indication he could find of the health of the disk drives was under the column of STATUS and it gave only the barest of information. His heart sank.

 

He silently cursed Hexadecimal for leading him astray. She heard his curse and almost condemned his WHS to a fate of fire and brimstone, but she relented once again, and implanted a thought; send a message via the mail of ether to the sage at Tentacle Software and entreat him to add much more S.M.A.R.T. capability to his DISK MANAGEMENT FOR WINDOWS HOME SERVER. And so he did. After clicking SEND, he sat back and said a silent prayer to Hexadecimal, who smiled slightly.

 

On the morrow he checked his mail of ether and found a response from the sage. He almost accidentally deleted the message in his haste to open it. As he scanned the message in hopes of hearing how to find S.M.A.R.T. features in DISK MANAGEMENT FOR WINDOWS HOME SERVER, or that the desired features would become available 'real soon now', he came across something unexpected, a recommendation to look for an Add-in called HOME SERVER SMART. His countenance warmed slightly; this truly was encouraging. He quickly said another prayer of thanks to Hexadecimal and traveled the ether to find the magical HOME SERVER SMART. And find it he did, and spirited it to his beloved WHS, and installed it, and checked it.

 

Hallelujah!!! There, in front of him, was the answer he was seeking; the one and a half terabyte Caviar Green disk drive had thirteen unreallocatable sectors.

 

In his haste, and again forgetting to invoke Hexidecimal's blessings (it was no wonder many of those around him whispered he suffered from The Alzheimers), he concluded he had found the problem; he would simply use the holy REMOVE DRIVE function to exorcise this plague of a disk drive from his precious WHS. And so he did, or so he thought.

 

Upon returning from his nightly slumbers to view the results of the removal process, he was astounded to discover that the always reliable REMOVE DRIVE had failed. The whole WHS was, once again, frozen. He hung his head as he repeated the all too familiar process of shutting down and restarting his beloved WHS.

 

Twice more he repeated the REMOVE DRIVE process, each time with the same result. He was frustrated, confused, angry even. Despite his growing feeling that she was punishing him, he implored Hexadecimal to help him. She considered his situation and decided he was such a noob she would have to help if he was ever to become her worthy subject. She implanted yet another thought: remember what you did before all this began.

 

He pondered the annoying thought for some time, puzzled. Suddenly, it hit him; the REMOVE DRIVE function could not complete its sacred duties because his desktop computer constantly had files open in its MY DOCUMENTS folder stored on the WHS. All he had to do was relocate his MY DOCUMENTS to his desktop computer and he could remove the sinful disk drive.

 

He moved quickly. He tried to use the RELOCATE function to move MY DOCUMENTS but it failed after completing only part of its duties. He cursed, but he was not to be denied this time. He would use the underappreciated RoboCopy to copy all of the documents from MY DOCUMENTS on the WHS to the desktop drive. He invoked the command. It proceeded with alacrity to copy the documents; that is, until it found one it could not copy.

 

Shazbut! cursed the homely geek. He checked which document or documents had drifted into bitrot pergatory. Of couse, he thought, it would have to be a Harry Potter document. He fine-tuned his RoboCopy command to completly avoid anything in the realm of Harry Potter and invoked it again.

 

Success! All of the documents now existed on the desktop computer drive as well as on his beloved WHS. He used the Explorer of Windows to grant him a view of the documents on his WHS. Firmly, he selected the entire contents of MY DOCUMENTS and pressed DELETE. The documents vanished like dining guests at the Inn when the waiter presents the bill.

 

Once again he invoked the RELOCATE MY DOCUMENTS function. This time, since there was nothing left to relocate, it succeeded, and quickly too!

 

And then, at long last, he was able to invoke the REMOVE DRIVE function to a successful conclusion. After the function completed, the homely geek performed a drive-ectomy on the plague-ridden Caviar Green disk drive and confined it to the dungeon of SpinRite, where it will spend many days paying penance for its sins.

 

Happy once again, the homely geek contemplated his adventures. What had he learned? What lessons could he take into the future? He decided there were two lessons of greatest import: never relocate MY DOCUMENTS to a server since it can cause two computers to misbehave, and pay much closer attention to the health of the disk drives in his WINDOWS HOME SERVER.

 

He sat back, feeling pretty satisfied. But something still bothered him. He couldn't think what it was. Then it hit him: never, ever, ever PISS OFF THE GODESSS OF COMPUTING!

 

Thus endeth the lesson.

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I'm sorry it's so long. I'm not a writer per se; I got on a roll and just couldn't figure out how to end it sooner. I am glad you enjoyed it though.

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That was a very enjoyable read...thankfully my issue doesn't seem as bad. The only issue I really had was stuttering video during a DVD playback. As of this morning the offending drive is being removed...for a secind time...and should be done hopefully in the next few hours.

 

You really have a talent for telling a story :)

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Very enjoyable read. :)

 

But you have WAY WAY too much time on your hands...

 

Keith

 

Once upon a time there lived a homely geek who was enamoured of his WHS. He loved it so much he thought he would save disk space on his everyday desktop computer (and eliminate the need for a second data drive altogether) by relocating his MY DOCUMENTS folder to a shared folder on his beloved WHS. So he intoned the magic incantation and his documents were RELOCATEd. He gazed at the result of his magical prowess and he was happy.

 

Unfortunately, the homely geek was not possessed of a gifted mind, seeing only the immediate rewards in front of him. And so he lived in bliss for a time, backing up his precious documents from his WHS to an eSATA 4-bay enclosure. "All is well in my data world", he thought.

 

Little did he know the error of his ways. Seeing only what was in front of him, he had forgotten to implore Hexadecimal, the Goddess of computing, to bless his efforts. She had been observing his feeble feats of computing magic and was much displeased by his sense of pride, over-confidence, and lack of humility.

 

She vowed to take her revenge for his lack of subservience and obedience to her majesty. And so did she, in a fit of spite and anger, cause one of the drives in his precious WHS to start failing... slowly.

 

Soon, his everyday computer began to run slowly and erratically. His precious WHS too began to behave in odd ways, often freezing up and refusing to allow him entry to the alter of the HOME SERVER CONSOLE.

 

The homely geek dispaired of his plight. What was happening to his desktop computer, yea, even to his precious WHS? He poured over log files, looked for even the tiniest clue within the revered HOME SERVER CONSOLE, and thought and thought, all to no avail. Like a beggar in the town square, he was reduced to taking what he could and reluctantly fell upon forcefully shutting down his beloved WHS and rebooting it.

 

He cringed in fear each time he pressed the button of power for the cryptic four seconds that caused his precious WHS to slip into a coma. After a short time he would press the button of power to once again awaken his WHS from its slumbers. Sometimes, it awoke fully and granted him access to the HOME SERVER CONSOLE. Sometimes, it only roused partly awake, and although it was content to reply to PING requests, it ignored all other pleas. And always, after a mere few hours, or as long as a still unpromising day or two, the freezeup would return.

 

His countenance became haggard, his mood foul. Why was this happening to him? He had no riches, was not possessed of a handsome countenance, had no artistic talent of any note; could he not be permitted this one thing, a steadfast and loyal computing environment?

 

Finally, in desperation, he pleaded, nay prayed, to the Goddess Hexadecimal to relieve him of his suffering. Hexadecimal was moved by his contriteness and relented... a little. In her infinite wisdom she decided to permit the homely geek just enough knowledge to help him out of his plight. She had not been totally mollified by his pleas.

 

Nevertheless, she placed into his mind a thought, a mere whisper; look for an Add-in that can provide more information about WHS. The homely geek brightened a little as the whisper guided his mind to a memory of an interview with the sage who developed a hard drive monitoring Add-in for the revered WHS. He traveled through the ether to the oracle, http://www.homeservershow.com. There, he consulted the anals of the Home Server Show Podcast and eventually came upon a name: Tentacle Software.

 

With his new-found knowledge he again traveled the ether, this time to http://www.tentaclesoftware.com. There he was presented with a wondrous site: DISK MANAGEMENT FOR WINDOWS HOME SERVER. He intoned the appropriate incantation and the essence of the Add-in was spirited to the SOFTWARE share on his WHS, which was responding favourably at that moment.

 

Quickly, before the dreaded freezeup could return, he invoked the HOME SERVER CONSOLE. Frantically, he navigated to the portal of Settings, and thence to the repository of Add-ins. Nervously, he clicked the prominent INSTALL button for DISK MANAGEMENT FOR WINDOWS HOME SERVER. The HOME SERVER CONSOLE informed him the Add-in had been installed with success. He said a quick prayer of thanks to Hexadecimal. She noted his prayer and decided his penance was sufficient to permit him to proceed.

 

The homely geek swiftly restarted the HOME SERVER CONSOLE and clicked on the DISK MANAGEMENT icon. It presented him with a etching of the disk drives in his beloved WHS. He scanned eagerly to find the mysterious S.M.A.R.T. settings; alas, to no avail. The only indication he could find of the health of the disk drives was under the column of STATUS and it gave only the barest of information. His heart sank.

 

He silently cursed Hexadecimal for leading him astray. She heard his curse and almost condemned his WHS to a fate of fire and brimstone, but she relented once again, and implanted a thought; send a message via the mail of ether to the sage at Tentacle Software and entreat him to add much more S.M.A.R.T. capability to his DISK MANAGEMENT FOR WINDOWS HOME SERVER. And so he did. After clicking SEND, he sat back and said a silent prayer to Hexadecimal, who smiled slightly.

 

On the morrow he checked his mail of ether and found a response from the sage. He almost accidentally deleted the message in his haste to open it. As he scanned the message in hopes of hearing how to find S.M.A.R.T. features in DISK MANAGEMENT FOR WINDOWS HOME SERVER, or that the desired features would become available 'real soon now', he came across something unexpected, a recommendation to look for an Add-in called HOME SERVER SMART. His countenance warmed slightly; this truly was encouraging. He quickly said another prayer of thanks to Hexadecimal and traveled the ether to find the magical HOME SERVER SMART. And find it he did, and spirited it to his beloved WHS, and installed it, and checked it.

 

Hallelujah!!! There, in front of him, was the answer he was seeking; the one and a half terabyte Caviar Green disk drive had thirteen unreallocatable sectors.

 

In his haste, and again forgetting to invoke Hexidecimal's blessings (it was no wonder many of those around him whispered he suffered from The Alzheimers), he concluded he had found the problem; he would simply use the holy REMOVE DRIVE function to exorcise this plague of a disk drive from his precious WHS. And so he did, or so he thought.

 

Upon returning from his nightly slumbers to view the results of the removal process, he was astounded to discover that the always reliable REMOVE DRIVE had failed. The whole WHS was, once again, frozen. He hung his head as he repeated the all too familiar process of shutting down and restarting his beloved WHS.

 

Twice more he repeated the REMOVE DRIVE process, each time with the same result. He was frustrated, confused, angry even. Despite his growing feeling that she was punishing him, he implored Hexadecimal to help him. She considered his situation and decided he was such a noob she would have to help if he was ever to become her worthy subject. She implanted yet another thought: remember what you did before all this began.

 

He pondered the annoying thought for some time, puzzled. Suddenly, it hit him; the REMOVE DRIVE function could not complete its sacred duties because his desktop computer constantly had files open in its MY DOCUMENTS folder stored on the WHS. All he had to do was relocate his MY DOCUMENTS to his desktop computer and he could remove the sinful disk drive.

 

He moved quickly. He tried to use the RELOCATE function to move MY DOCUMENTS but it failed after completing only part of its duties. He cursed, but he was not to be denied this time. He would use the underappreciated RoboCopy to copy all of the documents from MY DOCUMENTS on the WHS to the desktop drive. He invoked the command. It proceeded with alacrity to copy the documents; that is, until it found one it could not copy.

 

Shazbut! cursed the homely geek. He checked which document or documents had drifted into bitrot pergatory. Of couse, he thought, it would have to be a Harry Potter document. He fine-tuned his RoboCopy command to completly avoid anything in the realm of Harry Potter and invoked it again.

 

Success! All of the documents now existed on the desktop computer drive as well as on his beloved WHS. He used the Explorer of Windows to grant him a view of the documents on his WHS. Firmly, he selected the entire contents of MY DOCUMENTS and pressed DELETE. The documents vanished like dining guests at the Inn when the waiter presents the bill.

 

Once again he invoked the RELOCATE MY DOCUMENTS function. This time, since there was nothing left to relocate, it succeeded, and quickly too!

 

And then, at long last, he was able to invoke the REMOVE DRIVE function to a successful conclusion. After the function completed, the homely geek performed a drive-ectomy on the plague-ridden Caviar Green disk drive and confined it to the dungeon of SpinRite, where it will spend many days paying penance for its sins.

 

Happy once again, the homely geek contemplated his adventures. What had he learned? What lessons could he take into the future? He decided there were two lessons of greatest import: never relocate MY DOCUMENTS to a server since it can cause two computers to misbehave, and pay much closer attention to the health of the disk drives in his WINDOWS HOME SERVER.

 

He sat back, feeling pretty satisfied. But something still bothered him. He couldn't think what it was. Then it hit him: never, ever, ever PISS OFF THE GODESSS OF COMPUTING!

 

Thus endeth the lesson.

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That was a very enjoyable read...thankfully my issue doesn't seem as bad. The only issue I really had was stuttering video during a DVD playback. As of this morning the offending drive is being removed...for a secind time...and should be done hopefully in the next few hours.

 

You really have a talent for telling a story :)

Thanks. I hope you're issue is resolved much more easily. I originally never thought My Documents would be an issue cause Remove Drive is supposed to cut off access to shares (as I understand it). Apparently it's different in the situation I had; not sure why.

 

Very enjoyable read. :)

 

But you have WAY WAY too much time on your hands...

 

Keith

 

 

Looks like it, doesn't it. Believe it or not, it only took 10 min. to write. It was weird. I'm not a writer by a long shot, but I thought I would like to post something a little out of the ordinary, change things up a bit. Once I started on the idea it just came fast and furious; probably will never happen again (which most viewers will probably appreciate) ;)

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Thanks. I hope you're issue is resolved much more easily. I originally never thought My Documents would be an issue cause Remove Drive is supposed to cut off access to shares (as I understand it). Apparently it's different in the situation I had; not sure why.

 

I believe my issue is resolved...and yes the folders were all locked out from any activity while I was removing the drive...it took 8 days for the drive to be removed. One thought...did you have any of the files from the "My Documents: folder open while you tried to remove?

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I believe my issue is resolved...and yes the folders were all locked out from any activity while I was removing the drive...it took 8 days for the drive to be removed. One thought...did you have any of the files from the "My Documents: folder open while you tried to remove?

I don't think so, but your question gave me an idea. Doesn't windows keep open links to the thumbs.db and desktop.ini files in My Documents? If so, maybe that's a 'bingo'. And, what about the indexing service too?

 

The big thing is that once I relocated My Documents to my local drive all my Remove Drive issues disappeared. Coincidence? I think not. :)

Edited by ikon
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I believe my issue is resolved...and yes the folders were all locked out from any activity while I was removing the drive...it took 8 days for the drive to be removed. One thought...did you have any of the files from the "My Documents: folder open while you tried to remove?

 

 

Hmm, 8 days, I believe that is what the math said. Good to know math works.

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Hmm, 8 days, I believe that is what the math said. Good to know math works.

 

Yup...sadly your math worked out exactly as you had stated. Each day I looked at the status bar and calcualted bow mych longer it would take...that was an absolute pain waiting for it to complete. Hopefully now I no longer get an cideo studder on playback of my DVD rips.

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