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Inexpensive RAID Testing


jmwills

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NewEgg has these Western Digital Blue 160 gig drives for $19.99. Now, these are recertified drives but it will allow you to do some very cheap testing on a new build. We talk about mirroring the OS, test away.

 

I would not use these for the final build but for a test box, heck yes.

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ImTheTypeOfGuy

If it is a mirror, then what does it matter given the odds are both would not fail at the same time.

 

My concern with these small drives is that a year or two from now they may not even be available. What happens then when one crashes? Are you SOL given for raid they are to be the same size.

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I've never seen both drives fail in a RAID 1 configuration....never. You could always add a larger drive back to the array but you would lose anything over the 160 initial limit.

 

Again...I said for TESTING.

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I've never seen both drives fail in a RAID 1 configuration....never. You could always add a larger drive back to the array but you would lose anything over the 160 initial limit.

 

Again...I said for TESTING.

 

I actually have seen both drives in a RAID 1 fail. At times like those, you have to wonder if there really is such a thing as a preordained fate to spend several days rebuilding and restoring. :D

 

Just an opinion for anyone thinking of using these disks in production: yes you can usually rebuild a RAID 1 without data loss, but that doesn't mean you want to rely on that any more than you have to. I've found it's a good idea not to use "potentially troublesome" disks for production data that you care enough about to put in a RAID 1.

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I actually have seen both drives in a RAID 1 fail. At times like those, you have to wonder if there really is such a thing as a preordained fate to spend several days rebuilding and restoring. :D

 

Just an opinion for anyone thinking of using these disks in production: yes you can usually rebuild a RAID 1 without data loss, but that doesn't mean you want to rely on that any more than you have to. I've found it's a good idea not to use "potentially troublesome" disks for production data that you care enough about to put in a RAID 1.

 

All it needs to ruin both drives in raid1 array is an (in)convinient power surge...

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