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JROrtiz

JBOD or RAID?

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JROrtiz

tl;dr Should I still have data redundancy on my NAS if everything on the NAS is replicated elsewhere?

 

I'm finally getting around to reconfiguring my entire backup strategy and I find myself in a bit of a quandary. I know the real answer, but I think I just need to hear it to convince me to do what I already know I should. 

 

I have a Synology RS816 with four bays that will be my primary backup/file server, a Drobo that will be my secondary backup system (synced with the Synology) and Google Drive for my cloud backup solution (selective sync with the Synology). I have two storage pools on the Synology: Pool 1 is a 4TB HDD with no data redundancy used for system applications and surveillance station storage. These are things that I can easily rebuild if the drive fails and don't need a backup of my surveillance data. Pool 2 consists of three 8TB HDDs and will be used for primary storage. The dilemma I'm running into is whether I should use a full 8TB for data redundancy leaving me with only 16TB of storage space, or if I should have no data redundancy on the Synology and use all 24TB for storage space given that all of the data on the Synology will be replicated on the Drobo? What's the risk (aside from time copying the files back) of running JBOD vs RAID in this case?

 

I know that if I do end up needing more storage I can either use larger drives or expand the RS816 with an RX418, but I'm trying to maximize my setup with what I have now. 

 

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TheGuru

Personally, I would always use some kind of redundancy. But on the other hand, if you trust your drobo, you’d be fine with a JBOD setup. After all, HDD doesn’t crash that often.

 

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itGeeks

That's the problem with limited drive bays, I have a 2 bay installed at my daughter house with 2 6TB drives and I am using JBOD there. I do backup to another Synology box onsite and also to Synology C2 so like you I am not worried about data loss. 

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TheGuru

Synology C2? Hmm. Maybe I should give that a try. From the look of it, it looks like its based on AWS. 

 

Any experience with this service? Not just backing up, but actual restores... ?

 

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Al_Borges

I think its important to have an offline full backup in case you are caught and get ransomware.

 

Offsite would be be best but even an onsite offline backup is needed

 

Local redundancy is useful, especially for getting back up and running  quickly

 

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JROrtiz

Thanks for the input everyone. The Drobo is actually going to be off-site (at my parent's house) and will be synced using rsync or syncthing (still have to decide which works best here) so I'll always have access to a full backup while still being off-site. I was expecting to hear everyone telling me to go with some kind of on-device redundancy so it's reassuring that I wasn't crazy for considering the JBOD approach. I think I've decided to go with JBOD at this point. The only other thing I need to look into is how Synology would handle swapping a single drive in a JBOD config. Given my replication/backup strategy though, I think I will prioritize storage space over convenience. 

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JROrtiz

Update:

After a little more thought I realized I was wasting an entire bay on "system" stuff. My initial thought was to have a storage pool dedicated to "system" and a second storage pool for my actual file storage. Although I like that organization on paper, I realized that I lose storage/flexibility by doing it that way. So, I decided to create a single SHR storage pool and have a volume dedicated to system instead. This way I gain redundancy across the board and have all four bays to play with instead of being limited to three bays on one pool. The biggest gain that I feel I get is the ability to hot swap in the future. I currently have 2x8TB and 2x4TB and know that at some point I will want to upgrade the 4TB drives. If I went with JBOD, that means I would have to do a full restore of my files. This way, I can just swap a larger drive in.

 

Thanks again for the feedback. Definitely helped get to me my decision.

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TheGuru

SHR is a great RAID solution and good choice.

 

And if you plan to upgrade the disks later,  Synology can do that seamlessly.

 

I myself is a big fan of Synology. Their products may be a bit boring to look at, but their software is solid and they clearly are investing a lot of energy in their platform.

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itGeeks
On 9/19/2020 at 11:25 PM, JROrtiz said:

Update:

After a little more thought I realized I was wasting an entire bay on "system" stuff. My initial thought was to have a storage pool dedicated to "system" and a second storage pool for my actual file storage. Although I like that organization on paper, I realized that I lose storage/flexibility by doing it that way. So, I decided to create a single SHR storage pool and have a volume dedicated to system instead. This way I gain redundancy across the board and have all four bays to play with instead of being limited to three bays on one pool. The biggest gain that I feel I get is the ability to hot swap in the future. I currently have 2x8TB and 2x4TB and know that at some point I will want to upgrade the 4TB drives. If I went with JBOD, that means I would have to do a full restore of my files. This way, I can just swap a larger drive in.

 

Thanks again for the feedback. Definitely helped get to me my decision.

Hello sir,

I am also a extremely happy customer of everything Synology and I can honestly say with all due respect your thought process is a bit off. There is no gain making a separate partition for applications, with the built in "Hyper Backup" its extremely easy to backup the applications and restore as needed unlike Windows. In my humble opinion your over complicating things the way your doing it and also wasting valuable disk space trying to plan ahead for space needed. Your better off using making one volume for everything, then using "Hyper Backup" to backup what's needed. Fyi you also wont get any speed improvements installing applications on there own partition.

 

Just my 2 cents.

 

Hope this helps

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