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Apnow

Gen 8 Network interfaces not showing in standard boot Order (IPL)

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Apnow

Hi,

 

I bought a second hand Gen 8 (model F9A40A) to play with some CEPH storage solutions. I am trying to install a base linux distribution using PXE (checked with another PC and working) but I cannot setup the BIOS to boot from the ethernet nics.

 

I had a couple of Gen 8 back in time, and they had 5 different options to boot. This one only has 4. Apart from that, the HP boot sequence does not show the "normal" boot gui with several icons on the bottom right of the screen; A big HP proliant logo is shown in the screen and  command line text later.  Update BIOS to latest version (J06, 5/21/2018), restore bios settings to defaults checked RBSU and set to auto, set NIC1 to boot but nothing.

 

Anyone had same issue before? I am a bit lost...

 

Best,

  Apnow

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Apnow

Hi,

 

I think I solved the issue. After several firmware upgrades and removing the TPM module I managed to access to the usual GUI based startup.

 

I reset BIOS and ILO4 and HP insights recognized the ethernet card for the first time.

 

Now updating some software.

 

Best,

  Apnow

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