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Dave

How to connect the Synology MR2200AC to the RT2600AC via Ethernet Backhaul for your Wi-Fi Mesh Network

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Jason

Are you no longer using the Disney Circle on your network at all?

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Dave

I removed it to make this transition.  I don't like having another variable in there in case I run into issues.

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randman

Below is Synology’s official procedure for configuring MR2200ac with Ethernet backhaul:

 

https://www.synology.com/en-global/knowledgebase/SRM/tutorial/Network/How_do_I_deploy_a_Wi_Fi_system_via_Ethernet_cable

 

I have a Synology RT2600ac as my primary router and two MR2200ac to extend my network. I added the first MR2200ac successfully with Ethernet backhaul. Performance is great and roaming works really well. However,  I’m having trouble adding the second one. I have a support ticket opened against Synology. The MR2200ac is very new so I think setup is rough around the edges and I expect it to improve as firmware matures. 

 

I really like the Synology SRM interface. Also, I like how the RT2600ac supports two WAN interfaces. I use a cable modem as my primary interface and LTE as my backup interface, so if my cable modem connectivity goes down, the LTE hotspot takes over automatically. It’s rare that my cable modem connectivity goes down, but I’s so dependent on Internet access that its great to have automatic failover. 

 

 

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randman

I used to have a UniFi UAP-AC as Wi-Fi access points but it was a pain to administer (always had Java issues and couldn’t just configure it easily with any PC or Mac). Plus, wasn’t happy with its performance. Maybe there are better models and software these days, but my past experience left a bad impression for me. 

 

I havent yet tried Synology’s latest Safe Access software. I hope to set it up soon. At one point, I thought of getting Disney’s Circle, but I was afraid of adding a potential unknown to my network in terms of stability. As things stand now, not sure what implications there are of setting up a mesh network with managed switches in my LAN. I know some mesh networks don’t work well with managed swotches’ STP. Don’t know if it may be an issue or not with Synology, but some mesh networks from other vendors have issues with managed switches. 

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SpivR
2 hours ago, randman said:

always had Java issues and couldn’t just configure it easily with any PC or Mac)

Probably a historical relic?  UniFi doesn't use Java at all.

It isn't designed as a standalone a la carte system (buying just one or a few AP's).  The key architectural benefit of UniFi is that is uses an Enterprise (some may say "Enterprise-like") centralized management model using an integrated web console to manage all their devices.

From a "single pane of glass" you can manage Unifi Switches, Access Points, Security Gateway/Router, etc.  Although individual products come close to "best of breed" on their own merits (and most exceed the typical consumer products like Eero, Orbi, etc.) I wouldn't suggest anyone try UniFi unless they are interested in a unified view of their network and/or plan on using at least some of their gear beyond simple AP's.

Honestly, the systems to compare it to are Cisco, Open Mesh, Ruckus, Meraki, etc.  In that league of product, UniFi is the only one that is widely available to consumers, doesn't require restrictive dealer training/authorization, and be purchased one piece at a time.

In the consumer space, it is really suitable for the power user / hacker /expert that hates hardware that hides or limits features, considers the user "stupid" that needs to be protected from themselves, etc.

Whereas with a Cisco or traditional gear you are going to have learn a cryptic, proprietary command line language and an entire philosophy of operation to configure and get the most out of the gear, Unifi can be completely installed and operated by very straightforward mobile apps or a nice full-size web browser.

 

Uber users can SSH to any UniFi gear and have direct command line access to a real Unix/Linux kernel - if you know what you are doing, you can install your own modules and reconfigure anything - even things not exposed in the regular GUI web interface.

Having said that, many of their products can be used as "dumb" hardware devices if you don't actually configure them (e.g.  they have a nice line of 8-port PoE Smart Ethernet switches, but if you just plug them in and use them they work fine as "dumb" switches.)

 

In particular, the AP's by themselves can be set up in "standalone mode" with a few clicks of their smartphone app.  You don't get all the benefits of the centralized management system, but you can do it (I say don't; stick with Eero or other things if you aren't going to use real capability of UniFi).

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