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Gigabit Switch Question


NateDawg1148
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Expansion room is good, but dying????? If I loose a port (which has not yet happend) I will want to replace the whole unit. He does make a good point on expansion though.

 

Ports dying sounds a bit odd to me too.. Concidering what i just read from the specsheet of a d-link 16-port gbit router.. If it dies according to MTBF figure, you plug it in today and it dies in july 2105. Which makes me wonder how in the heck have they come to that figure anyway..

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Ports dying sounds a bit odd to me too.. Concidering what i just read from the specsheet of a d-link 16-port gbit router.. If it dies according to MTBF figure, you plug it in today and it dies in july 2105. Which makes me wonder how in the heck have they come to that figure anyway..

I have never had a port die on my home network. We have had bad ports at work but this is usually due to a lightning strike or surge and the switch acted like the fuse.

 

MTBF value is usually based upon a model and predicted failure. The models take into account the specifications for temperature, voltages, how close devices are to their max operating voltages and temperatures, reliability of each components used, etc. They will roll all this information together into a prediction model to come up with the MTBF. Remember though, this is MEAN time before failure so there we will be some devices that are expected to last less time as well as some longer.

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Ports dying sounds a bit odd to me too.. Concidering what i just read from the specsheet of a d-link 16-port gbit router.. If it dies according to MTBF figure, you plug it in today and it dies in july 2105. Which makes me wonder how in the heck have they come to that figure anyway..

I can confirm that ports do sometimes die; not often, but it does happen, even on expensive hardware. From what I've heard from the manufacturers it's mostly the driver circuit for the chip, but I'm no EE so I can't say definitely. We've had it happen to a few ports at work - we usually replace the switch cause it's too much of a hassle to keep track of the dead ones, and also cause it doesn't happen often so it doesn't cost too much.

 

Also, I'm writing this post on a PC that has an Asus mobo with 2 ether ports. 1 of them died about a year ago. Before it died it started getting flaky. I would reboot the computer and the BIOS would come up saying the LAN port couldn't be found, or something like that. I would reboot again and most often it would be OK - sometimes I would have to boot more than once. Eventually, it stopped working at all. I had to move to the other ether port, which is the one I'm using now. Now it's starting to act flaky, the same as the first one. So far though, it's still working (obviously :) ).

 

Why not install an add-in NIC? For the obvious reason; no slots left.

 

I tried new PSUs - no difference (good ones; a Corsair & an Antec)

 

I plan to set up a new Sandybridge system this spring, so I'm not too worried about the ether ports. I'll turn this mobo into a WHS v2 but, since it won't need all the add-in cards I have now, I'll have room for an add-in NIC (other than the ether ports this mobo is rock solid; runs for months at a time without reboot or issues).

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