Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)
alex1002

Upgrade drive size inplace without loosing data

Recommended Posts

alex1002

I have a Synology with 4*2tb drives. I want know if possible anyone successfully upgrade the drives without loosing their data. My plan is too pull one drive install a new one. Let the array rebuild. Then go to the next one till all done. Then hopefully be able to increase array size. I have done this way with an areca raid card in a server. And worked fine. I know there's a risk and I do have full backup too just incase.

Thank you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jazzerjay

Very possible and very easy as I've done this very thing several times.  Read the doc below and follow the steps. (RE: make sure the volume is repaired before removing another drive)

 

Also to note, the amount of data will make little to no difference.  While I didn't actually run numbers to test, I can assure you that each drive replacement takes a long time. For me moving from 4*3TB drives to 4*4TB drives took a few days. Hope this helps!  (don't forget your backups-be paranoid)

 

https://www.synology.com/en-us/knowledgebase/DSM/help/DSM/StorageManager/volume_diskgroup_expand_replace_disk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowPeo

Yes, make sure there are backups, if not you have no protection, you are breaking the RAID (intentionally but none-the-less you are breaking it), not that a RAID array is a backup anyway

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ikon-TNG
29 minutes ago, ShadowPeo said:

not that a RAID array is a backup anyway

 

LOL, exactly what my father used to say :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ImTheTypeOfGuy
 

LOL, exactly what my father used to say

He was professor no-raid when it comes to backups.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ikon-TNG
2 hours ago, ImTheTypeOfGuy said:

He was professor no-raid when it comes to backups.

 

 

LOL, I can well believe it :)  I don't know if he ever mentioned it, but he learned that lesson the hard way. I can still recall how pissed he was when a RAID card failed. I may not have understood the details, but I understood very well the loss of data, and that a RAID card was to blame. From then on, he beefed up his backup to what it became when I inherited it. He said that, really, he was to blame, by relying on a piece of hardware to do something it really wasn't designed to do.

 

And, it seems to me, it's probably a good lesson for others to learn from.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...