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Alternatives to Cloud storage

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Drashna Jaelre

It would be cheaper to buy LTO equipment and store the tapes in a security deposit box.....

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ShadowPeo

Would be, but

 

A: that is effort I prefer automation to work. Like most people (especially techs) I am inherently lazy, especially when it comes to backups

 

B: Cannot be automatically kept up to date

 

C: I do not control the bank deposit box per say.

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Drashna Jaelre

I said cheaper, not easier. :) 

 

And yeah, I agree with you.  

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ShadowPeo
2 hours ago, Drashna Jaelre said:

I said cheaper, not easier. :) 

 

And yeah, I agree with you.  

Cannot disagree with that comment

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PCEddie

I have been a customer of CrashPlan for several years and put my money where my mouth is by buying the family plan. When CrashPlan decided to stop supporting their consumer side of the business and focus on the business side, my first reaction was outrage. I taken a step back and changed my attitude towards CrashPlan. I want to thank CrashPlan for opening up my eyes to other off site backup options as I was complaisance for several years paying CrashPlan to backup my files off site. I have looked at other off site backup options, read articles, and listened to different podcasts to help me with my decision for a off site backup option. What really helped me make a decision on what off site backup option to use was the purchase of the Synology NAS at the last meetup. I have setup Synology Cloud Station Server on my Synology DS 414 Slim and Synology Cloud Station ShareSync the Synology DS1513+ (which is setup at my sister and brother in-law's house). Thanks John for answering my questions on how to setup the Synology Cloud Sync. Now I have a off site backup that I can control and have confidence it will last for many years to come. 

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itGeeks

@PCEddie Having used Synology and its packages since 2012 I can tell you that "Cloud station" is not backup and should not be confused for backup. For true backup you should be using Hyper Backup, There are two components the Hyper Backup Server and Hyper Backup Client. Checkout Lon's how-to video here

 

To spit other pitfalls of using 'Cloud station' as a substitute for backup is you can not restore at the folder level only at the file level, So imagine trying to do a complete restore after a virus or complete system meltdown. 

 

Other then that good choice to go Synology, Congrats on your purchase....

Edited by itGeeks
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PCEddie

itGeeks,

 

Thanks for your input. You got me thinking and doing some more research on how to backup my data since CrashPlan is going bye bye for home users in a few months. My current backup strategy is all essential files are backup to the Synology ds414 slim that I won at a meetup. For off site backup, I setup the Synology CloudStation server on my Synology ds414 slim and Synology Cloudstation client on the Synology ds1513 that is setup at my sister and brother in-law's network. For non essential files, I used Microsoft OneDrive keep a copy of the files in the cloud and Synology Cloud Sync to keep a copy of the files on my Synology ds414 slim and Synology ds1513. By using this method, my cost for off site backup is the annual Office 365 subscription ($99), the Synology ds414 slim and ds1513, and any future cost of hard drive replacement due to failed hard drives. 

 

I am open for suggestions. 

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itGeeks

I feel your pain as for the confusion on what do do, What technology to use to accomplish your goals. When we have the wealth of options that Synology offers us and the fact that when you look at these options they seem to overlap in some ways and that can cause us to make the wrong choices in what we use. Try calling Synology and ask the rep when should we use Hyper Backup vs Cloud Station and see what answers you get, They are dumb founded on what to say. They will tell you that there both used for backup, Wrong answer.

 

Let me try my best to break it down for you and share what I have learned since 2012 using Synology and all there great packages.

 

As I have already said, Using the 'Cloud Station suit' is not backup, It is strictly used for syncing of folders and files within. This does not allow for folder level recovery in the event of a virus or system meltdown. Cloud Station retains up to 32 versions for file rollback, Notice I said FILE rollback not folders. This works in the same way as 'Windows File History backup'

 

'Hyper Backup' Also retains up to 32 versions but you can rollback at not only the file level but also complete folders. Hyper Backup also allows you to select anything and everything on your hard drive to backup unlike Cloud Station though I would not backup me entire hard drive. Hyper Backup just like Cloud Station allows you to backup to multiple destinations including cloud services with encryption.

 

OK so what does this all mean and when should you use one over the other? Here is what I have finally figured out and what I do after struggling with this same topic.

 

1) Use 'Cloud Station' suite if,

a) you like to keep your files stored on your computer and you use multiple devices and want to have those files synced to all your devices for viewing/editing and have those changes reflected across all your devices. One example would be you have a desktop and laptop that you use. (I do use 'Cloud Station' for this use case) But I also use Hyper Backup to backup those same files...

b: You have a work-group of people that need access to those files and everyone needs to to view and or edit them and have all changes reflected across the people in the group.

 

2) Use Hyper Backup someplace in this chain to correctly backup your files, I can't stress this enough.....

Edited by itGeeks
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ImTheTypeOfGuy
10 hours ago, itGeeks said:

As I have already said, Using the 'Cloud Station suit' is not backup, It is strictly used for syncing of folders and files within. This does not allow for folder level recovery in the event of a virus or system meltdown. Cloud Station retains up to 32 versions for file rollback, Notice I said FILE rollback not folders. This works in the same way as 'Windows File History backup'

 

1) Use 'Cloud Station' suite if,

a) you like to keep your files stored on your computer and you use multiple devices and want to have those files synced to all your devices for viewing/editing and have those changes reflected across all your devices. One example would be you have a desktop and laptop that you use. (I do use 'Cloud Station' for this use case) But I also use Hyper Backup to backup those same files...

b: You have a work-group of people that need access to those files and everyone needs to to view and or edit them and have all changes reflected across the people in the group.

 

For cloud station you indicate it is not backup, yet you indicate it syncs folders and files within. I am not sure what you mean by "within". I would argue if it syncs files from one computer to another it is backup because you have it in two locations. Yes I recognize if you delete it on one machine it is deleted on the other. But if it isn't deleted, you have two copies, which is part of the definition of backup. Sorry, I know this is a bit of semantics, I am just trying to learn as much as possible on synology before I buy one.

 

For cloud station I am not sure if you are talking about syncing files from on machine to another or the files are on a network drive that all machines can access.

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itGeeks

Sorry for the confusion. Correct its not backup and should not be seen as such. When I say syncs folders and files within that is correct but you can't roll-back/recover at the folder level only at the file level so if you need to restore/roll-back more then a few files your going to have a bad day.

 

As for your 2nd point-

" I would argue if it syncs files from one computer to another it is backup because you have it in two locations. Yes I recognize if you delete it on one machine it is deleted on the other. But if it isn't deleted, you have two copies, which is part of the definition of backup."

 

This would only be true if you where trying to create some high availability and wanted 24 access in the event one server was down but  you still need to follow this up with true backup aka Hyper Backup, Remember its a sync we are talking about so if you get a virus, malware its synced to your destination.

 

What I do only for myself is I sync all my files to the NAS then I have Hyper Backup on the NAS to backup everything on the NAS to a 2nd NAS in-house and also off-site, This way your covered. The only reason I sync my files is because I use a desktop when home and a laptop when away and I like to keep some files stored locally on both devices. The rest of my family I just use Hyper Backup to backup there files.

 

On closing, I think the point I am trying to make is there are use cases where you need to use Sync but it should never be considered backup. I hope this is clear now?

Edited by itGeeks

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