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Calby

Can every VM share hardware resources?

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Calby    6
Calby

Hi,
I'm running Windows Server 2016 and I want to setup 3 VM's trough Hyper-V.
I have 8GB ram and 3 harddrivers.
 

And I'm wondering if it's possible to make all of the VM's share the RAM, CPU and harddrive? Some kind of dynamic mode or something like that?
I want this because some of the servers 'll not use all of the RAM during all time etc. so I want them to share it.
Is it possible?

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Trig0r    117
Trig0r

Yes is the short answer.

You'll have to be careful on the RAM front though, 2016 on its own will use about 2Gb leaving you 6Gb to play with, what are your VM's going to be doing...

You'll probably want to give each one 1.5Gb as startup RAM and go from there.

 

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Calby    6
Calby
30 minutes ago, Trig0r said:

Yes is the short answer.

You'll have to be careful on the RAM front though, 2016 on its own will use about 2Gb leaving you 6Gb to play with, what are your VM's going to be doing...

You'll probably want to give each one 1.5Gb as startup RAM and go from there.

 

I'll add 8GB more of RAM later on.

I'll have the VM's for this:
1. Torrent server.
2. PlexServer and SMB server

Then later on one OwnCloud server and one WebbServer.

So all of the VM's can see the same harddrives?
It's important as I want them to share the data together.

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Trig0r    117
Trig0r

What CPU do you have?

I'd be tempted to drop an SSD in there as a VM store, then setup the VM's on that.

When you say 1. Torrent server. 2. PlexServer and SMB

Where does 3 fit in?

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Calby    6
Calby
2 hours ago, Trig0r said:

What CPU do you have?

I'd be tempted to drop an SSD in there as a VM store, then setup the VM's on that.

When you say 1. Torrent server. 2. PlexServer and SMB

Where does 3 fit in?

I got the Xeon E-1265L V2
I'm running my "main" windows server 2016 on a SSD and I'll run the VM's from a other SSD.

 

I did not have a third one :P plex & smb is the same.

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Trig0r    117
Trig0r

Ok, well when I still had my Gen8 as my server at home..

E3-1260L

16Gb

2x 250Gb SSD's

3x4Tb

1x6Tb

 

SSD's were boot for the OS and a VM store.

I had 2 VM's, a Torrent and Plex.

All file sharing etc was done by the host 2016 install and access was given to the VM's via mapped drives.

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Jason    53
Jason

How well did Plex run in a VM? I had to move it to my WSE12R2 core i5-3570K host w 32 GB RAM else mine performed poorly.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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ShadowPeo    29
ShadowPeo

The VM's will use VHD's for Hard Disks, depending on how you set up the disks in the BIOS/EFI/OS depends on how the VM's will treat them. On a RAID array (which you are using, aren't you.... and I mean a REAL RAID, not RAID0) then the VHD's will grow to the size you allow, and you can stick as many VHD's as you want on the physical disks so long as they do not attempt to exceed in size the physical disks (important to remember if you are not utilising a fixed disk) you can also pass through a physical disk but this is a one machine only proposition to the best of my knowledge.

To have multiple machines share a storage set, you simply use shared folders, there are other ways but this is the best for someone with no experience in the other methods and with the hardware you have described.

RAM again is shareable, especially utilising dynamic memory which works fine in Windows Server 2012 (or is it 2012 R2, I cannot recall) and above. I do not know if the supported linux systems can utilise it or not. What this dynamic memory does allows you to state a minimum, a maximum and the startup memory. The minimum and maximum are exactly what they state they are, the startup memory is how much the HyperVisor will be allocated on the VM startup, this will then increase or decrease based upon what the machine needs and available resources. It is however important in this scenario to set priority to ensure the more important machines get priority access to resources. You can also set a buffer for the RAM, i.e. the a 20% buffer on the RAM will keep at least 20% more RAM allocated to the machine than it needs for allowing the instantaneous burst rather than having to go through the dynamic RAM allocation process, thus allowing the allocation process time to keep up as it were with the domain

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Calby    6
Calby
1 hour ago, ShadowPeo said:

The VM's will use VHD's for Hard Disks, depending on how you set up the disks in the BIOS/EFI/OS depends on how the VM's will treat them. On a RAID array (which you are using, aren't you.... and I mean a REAL RAID, not RAID0) then the VHD's will grow to the size you allow, and you can stick as many VHD's as you want on the physical disks so long as they do not attempt to exceed in size the physical disks (important to remember if you are not utilising a fixed disk) you can also pass through a physical disk but this is a one machine only proposition to the best of my knowledge.

To have multiple machines share a storage set, you simply use shared folders, there are other ways but this is the best for someone with no experience in the other methods and with the hardware you have described.

RAM again is shareable, especially utilising dynamic memory which works fine in Windows Server 2012 (or is it 2012 R2, I cannot recall) and above. I do not know if the supported linux systems can utilise it or not. What this dynamic memory does allows you to state a minimum, a maximum and the startup memory. The minimum and maximum are exactly what they state they are, the startup memory is how much the HyperVisor will be allocated on the VM startup, this will then increase or decrease based upon what the machine needs and available resources. It is however important in this scenario to set priority to ensure the more important machines get priority access to resources. You can also set a buffer for the RAM, i.e. the a 20% buffer on the RAM will keep at least 20% more RAM allocated to the machine than it needs for allowing the instantaneous burst rather than having to go through the dynamic RAM allocation process, thus allowing the allocation process time to keep up as it were with the domain

If you share the harddrives trough shared folders every data transfer 'll go trough the network right? In that case, I'll not do that as then I'll take resources from the network card to do internal data transfer or did I misunderstand that?

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Trig0r    117
Trig0r
12 hours ago, Jason said:

How well did Plex run in a VM? I had to move it to my WSE12R2 core i5-3570K host w 32 GB RAM else mine performed poorly.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Fine for me, guess it depends what devices and what your source media is, I gave mine 8Gb RAM and all 8 cores of the Xeon which probablhy helped, as well as it being on an SSD..

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