Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)

RESET 24 - Wiring and cameras for your pool house


SpivR
 Share

Recommended Posts

No clear-cut best choice, but I prefer the centralized control of being able to configure everything on the router rather than navigating the different UI on each device to set static IP.

 

FWIW - I've rarely had to replace a router on an emergency basis and I always use a decent router that has a save/restore feature for configuration data and I make sure to backup the config every time I make a change so an emergency reconfiguration would only be a few clicks.

 

If you like the concept of centralized configuration but are worried about the router, you could configure a standalone DHCP server instead (but that just moves the potential failure somewhere else).  One could also keep a backup DHCP server configured properly but not active until needed. (For me, keeping two configs in sync manually would be more problematic and less desirable).

 

Just an FYI, this problem has been solved long ago with Enterprise gear - just takes buying two routers and configuring the "hot standby" mode to keep them in sync and ready.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, SpivR said:

No clear-cut best choice, but I prefer the centralized control of being able to configure everything on the router rather than navigating the different UI on each device to set static IP.

 

FWIW - I've rarely had to replace a router on an emergency basis and I always use a decent router that has a save/restore feature for configuration data and I make sure to backup the config every time I make a change so an emergency reconfiguration would only be a few clicks.

 

If you like the concept of centralized configuration but are worried about the router, you could configure a standalone DHCP server instead (but that just moves the potential failure somewhere else).  One could also keep a backup DHCP server configured properly but not active until needed. (For me, keeping two configs in sync manually would be more problematic and less desirable).

 

Just an FYI, this problem has been solved long ago with Enterprise gear - just takes buying two routers and configuring the "hot standby" mode to keep them in sync and ready.

 

We think very similarly and I am going to go the same centralized route you reference. I am not concerned about my router breaking and if it did it would have little impact.

 

Well I have Blue Iris running and am learning the software while I play with this one camera I bought. I have a 16 port POE switch and another camera coming so I can start building this out. Soon I will have at least 8 cameras.

 

In the end, I would be more concerned with Blue Iris crashing and losing all the configuration settings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

in the end it is really a 'one time choice' anyway so I am sure other parts of the project will be far more interesting

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, nrf said:

in the end it is really a 'one time choice' anyway so I am sure other parts of the project will be far more interesting

 

Yes, like getting in my attic, which is currently 117 degrees, to run cat 6. Or any of the items below.

 

I am thinking about putting two cameras on each side of my house. I plan to put them at opposite ends and point them towards each other. Then I will add one by my front door and one by my back door. Anyone with experience have any comments on that layout? Does it sound like overkill, not enough, etc?

 

I plan to make each side of my house a zone so if one camera in a zone is tripped it will record all cameras in the zone instead of just the one that had detected motion. At least this will be my starting point. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my experimentation, it took me quite a while to realize I could just record from every camera continuously and not worry so much about motion triggers being so precise.

 

The key is to use low frame rates and adjust compression or file formats to strike the right balance between disk storage and performance.  Most HD cameras tout their 30fps capability, but I've found 5 to 7 fps is more than enough to capture useful footage.

Then I configure triggers to activate a second "virtual camera" feed based on an existing camera.  These feeds use a higher frame rate and custom motion triggers and masks.

This allows me to quickly review triggered footage, but still have full archive continuous coverage if I need to see more than what the trigger recorded.

Your goals may be different, but this saved me a lot of time and effort over-engineering the triggers and continuously tweaking them.

 

(I have to admit I got the idea when I was talking with a friend who bought one of those analog security camera kits from a big box store.  He said he just records all the cameras continuously and that got me thinking...)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, SpivR said:

In my experimentation, it took me quite a while to realize I could just record from every camera continuously and not worry so much about motion triggers being so precise.

 

The key is to use low frame rates and adjust compression or file formats to strike the right balance between disk storage and performance.  Most HD cameras tout their 30fps capability, but I've found 5 to 7 fps is more than enough to capture useful footage.

Then I configure triggers to activate a second "virtual camera" feed based on an existing camera.  These feeds use a higher frame rate and custom motion triggers and masks.

This allows me to quickly review triggered footage, but still have full archive continuous coverage if I need to see more than what the trigger recorded.

Your goals may be different, but this saved me a lot of time and effort over-engineering the triggers and continuously tweaking them.

 

(I have to admit I got the idea when I was talking with a friend who bought one of those analog security camera kits from a big box store.  He said he just records all the cameras continuously and that got me thinking...)

 

I like that approach. I will have to start testing that way in a few days before adding more cameras. This way I can compare it to the current setup and determine what is best for me. Space is not an issue even at a full 30 fps so I don't have to worry about that.

 

Thanks for the suggestion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

SpivR

 

So what hardware are you running your software on? I am using a gen 1 I7 920 at 2.66 GHz and 12 GB's at 1600 MHz of memory, and 190 GB's of free space on a 232 GB &200 RPM SATA 1 HDD. The OS is S2008R2. What OS do you typically install it on? Seems like that should have plenty of power to me. I have had some issues with the app flickering and unresponsive while doing that. I can't even kill the app through task manager when it happens but it will quit after a few minutes and things work fine. I did update it to the latest version today and haven't seen that issue since so hopefully it is fixed. But it made me wonder what kind of hardware you have used for clients on Blue Iris. Also, when this occurs my memory and processor are both under 40% utilization.

 

I have been playing with all the settings a lot and am enjoying it. Next I need to get into the attic and start running cat 6 and purchase the rest of my cameras. A lot of work and fun ahead.

 

Thanks again for all your tech support and for making the recommendation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Client PC's are running on 16GB of ram, 1 TB of SATA disk but I don't recall the exact processor speed although probably at least a Core i5 and most likely a Core i7.

 

For my testing, I run using a virtual machine hosted on VirtualBox with about 4 cameras.

 

I haven't seen any flickering.  Since you are running 40% or under, I would point the finger at the video card especially since continuous video would likely stress the video hardware first before taxing the overall cpu.  But if the new release has fixed it, you might be ok now.

 

Glad to be of help and happy it is working out for you.

 

A quick question - are you using PoE power for your cameras?  If so, what PoE switch are you using and does it have software interface (SNMP or web interface) to turn individual ports on or off?

I haven't found any affordable low-end PoE switches other than dumb switches that don't have port control.  I use mainly mid-range or high-end switches that can do that but it would nice to find a small (8 to 16 port) switch also.

 

If the PoE switch doesn't have port control, that means there is no easy way to power reset an individual camera, just the whole set (by putting external control on the power supply to the PoE switch as a whole.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The video card is a EVGA GeForce GT 240 Superclocked Video Card - 512MB DDR5, PCI-Express 2.0, DVI, HDMI, which isn't anything special. I will monitor and see if the update may have addressed it. If not I may buy a new video card for it. The system is at least 7.5 years old so it is pretty old technology.

 

Yes I am using POE. I too couldn't find a low cost switch so I went with a Linksys LGS318P 18-Port Gigabit PoE+ Smart Switch. Unfortunately it was $279 but it is 18 ports and I usually over build to ensure I don't wish I had bought more powerful, more ports, etc. The switch is highly manageable by port but I didn't see anything about cycling the power on just one port. I am new to POE switches so I may be overlooking it. I plan to dig into it after I get all the cameras set up the way I want them. Oh, it did come with software but I didn't install it. I just use the web interface. I did find using the Amcrest web interface I can schedule reboots or manually force a reboot. Of course for that to work I have to know the camera and log into it. Obviously not as simple as doing it at the switch. I will continue to look and will let you know if I find it capable of port reboots.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not a big fan of scheduling periodic device reboots.  Some my peers feel even more strongly - they believe that if a device has a built in feature to schedule reboots it means the developers gave up on finding a memory leak or other software bug and took the lazy way out.

The reason to use an external reboot mechanism (and PoE port toggling is the most elegant) is to handle those rare, but occasional external issues where the device is completely unresponsive so you can't login through  a web or ssh interface to politely reboot.

 

If your switch is manageable, it will have an option to turn an individual port on or off.  If the port is PoE enabled, that will toggle the power to the attached device.  (Some people lock down a network by disabling at the switch all ports that are not in use to avoid someone plugging in a stray RJ-45 -- either accidentally or maliciously.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...