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dvn

Windows 7 - problem with Network Discovery

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dvn

Your server doesn't use it and I presuming you are still on Version 1. Unless your router supports IPv6 there is no reason to use it, IMO. Whenever I see this Discovery Issue, it always seems to point back to IPv6 being turned off. I have seen some posts that giving your machines an IP address reservation (not a static IP) can help with this issue too.

 

Personally, for an internal network I see no reason to be running IPv6; you gain nothing. In the real world, your ISP and their source provider, there is a need for it. These are just my opinions. I have only seen one MS platform that requires that IPv6 be turned on and that is SBS2008.

OK, noted. I am using Address Reservation for my PC and WHS, only. For now, I will wait and see if the problem reoccurs. If so, I'll uninstall IPv6. I have WHS, so I don't use HomeGroup. It won't be a problem.

 

Please clarify what you mean by "In the real world, your ISP and their source provider, there is a need for it."

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jmwills

There are a couple of ways for ISP's to create their VLAN's (virtual LANS) which require special networking skills that I learned to pass a test and then forgot :) With IPv6, there are more public IP addresses available "than there are stars in the sky" 128 bit addresses versus 32 bit addresses. In short you go from just slightly over 4 billion available addresses with IP4 to this number with IPv6:

 

 

340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456

 

 

I think we are good for awhile now. Again, v6 would be used outside your LAN by your ISP and their providers.

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dvn

Ha, I actually knew about the shortage of IP's and how ISPs are using 10. networks to stave off the inevitable. But basically, it looks like IPv4 is here for a bit longer.

 

What might an ISP use a VLAN for?

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jmwills

If it's a small ISP with a limited number number of addresses available to them, they could use VLAN's to "extend" their capability. In laymen's rough terms, you can think of a VLAN in what a SOHO router would be to you.

 

The true purpose of a VLAN, as I know it, is to give you the ability to direct traffic to resources as needed. Fro instance we use special VLAN's to allow access between sites. If you IP in not in that VLAN, you are l blocked from accessing resources out of this site, no matter what your rights are.

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dvn

Hey, I just got a great idea for another HSS podcast - Networks: From the Beginning

 

Let's see, I think I'll suggest AJ, you, ...

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jmwills

Now that's funny......I can get myself into some real trouble with networking. I know Systems and just enough networking to get myself into trouble. However, the idea is a good one.

 

John

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dvn

If I new more about networks, I'd outline the first 20 shows myself. Done right, it would be a great resource. It's a subject that would be near impossible to exhaust.

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dvn

It happened again, the connection problem, right after I added a drive to my storage pool. Yes, I know. I doesn't make sense to me either. Anyway, I unchecked IPv6 in LAN properties and the connection was reestablished immediately, without reboot. I'll keep an eye on this for awhile. I hope this is the fix I've been looking for.

 

So what network device has problems with IPv6? The router? WHS?

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jmwills

There are some routers on the market that are IPv6 capable but my guess only the ISP's in the larger metro area are even thinking about going to IPv6 down to the end user.

 

The easiest way I can describe the network topology for IPv6 would be if no device on the LAN needs it, turn it off. It's just another service running that is possibly not needed. The only time I have seen it necessary is by SBS2008 and having it turned off caused an issue. It could be the final version of Vail/Aurora might also have that quirk requiring IPv6 to be turned on, but for v1 it is not needed.

 

The only other piece of hardware involved would be the NIC card on the client machine. There could be an updated driver out for it that might help your situation.

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usacomp2k3

Vista and Windows 7 both use ipv6 when communicating with each other. That nifty thing called HomeGroup relies on it.

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