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LED Lighting


kylejwx
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Hey guys, I have been watching Home Automation from the sidelines, but haven't jumped in because I was previously renting and could't really do much.  I just bought my first house and am thinking up all kinds of possibilities.  Right now, I am actually just focused on getting rid of all the old incandescent light bulbs in my house and I am not even "automating" anything yet.

 

What recommendations do you have for brand names, quality, and deals on LED light bulbs?  I do not need them to be dimmable.  I need a bunch for inside the house and also a couple of flood lights for outside the garage.  

 

And actually, I would like the one at the garage to be a "Dusk to Dawn" situation that automatically comes on at night.  I saw fixtures at Lowe's that would do that, but it would be cool if there were a bulb that could do that without having to replace the whole fixture.

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I can't figure out how to post pictures on this forum, but I put a picture in OneDrive.

 

http://1drv.ms/1pYE3N6

 

 

On the left is the $5 Utilitech LED bulb I bought from Lowe's. It was cheap, but it is rated at 450 lumens which seems lower than some others.  The color temperature is rated at 3000K and I think we prefer a slightly higher color temperature for more of a cool, blue light.

 

One the right is the flood light that I need to replace.

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I have had good luck with Cree and Duracell. I prefer daylight bulbs in hallways. In bathrooms I really like 3M LED's. The Philips flat bulbs seem to give good light distribution. I like the color of CFL's, but they are slow to come up to full light. Oddly, some cheap CFL's come on very fast.

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making some changes:

yml1w.jpg

 

the Philips lights are for a bathroom fixture that hangs down from the ceiling. The bulbs are at eye level. The Philips have 360 dispersion.

The Ecosmart are an experiment. They are a bit smaller than a standard A19. I have a light above the sink that is very small.

Although they are slow to come up to full light, I still like the color/light of CFL's. I tend to read by a three way lamp.

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Very few LEDs are rated for outdoor use.  I'm going to swap out the switches for the outdoor lights rather than the fixture or the bulb.

 

For the indoor bulbs:

Some people say that a 60 watt is equivalent to 450-600 lumens.  Others say, and I agree, that you need an LED that is closer to 800 lumens. Note that over the 15-20 year life of LEDs they are expected to get dimmer.

The color temperature is important we found 6000 too blue and 2700 much softer but still less yellow than incandescent.

I found what I think are good prices on Amazon, but bought one bulb at a time until I found some that I like.

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  • 7 months later...

Very few LEDs are rated for outdoor use.  I'm going to swap out the switches for the outdoor lights rather than the fixture or the bulb.

 

For the indoor bulbs:

Some people say that a 60 watt is equivalent to 450-600 lumens.  Others say, and I agree, that you need an LED that is closer to 800 lumens. Note that over the 15-20 year life of LEDs they are expected to get dimmer.

The color temperature is important we found 6000 too blue and 2700 much softer but still less yellow than incandescent.

I found what I think are good prices on Amazon, but bought one bulb at a time until I found some that I like.

 

 

I agree. You need to try some to see what you like, but also match them to the location you are using them in.

 

For outdoor use these have worked well:

http://www.usa.philips.com/c-p/046677405854/energy-saver-twister

They are not instant on, but they light up quicker than most CFL and they have a light sensor.

 

For outdoor use, you need a CFL with a built-in ballast, or an LED bulb that is wet-rated or damp-rated, depending on the application.

 

I've got a few CFL bulbs outside and we just got two more of our outdoor fixtures repaired, after like a year or two of not being able to use them, so I wanted to install some LED bulbs in those... I did some searching around and found that 60W wet- or damp-rated bulbs are much more difficult to find than I expected, as are LED bulbs that can be used in fully enclosed fixtures. I finally discovered that at least some of the CREE bulbs are rated for outdoor use, as long as they are not directly exposed to weather (damp-rated, basically), and that they are suitable for use in enclosed fixtures, though not multi-bulb fixtures with a mix of lighting technologies. One of these such bulbs is the BA19-08027OMF-12DE26-2U100, soft white, 800 lumen, dimmable, 9.5 Watt (60W-equivalent) bulb. I've got one installed in our front porch light, and it seems to be working beautifully.

 

I've recently been on a mission to update all, or most, of our indoor lighting from incandescent (and a few CFLs) to LED bulbs. I've got all but two of our 65W canister bulbs updated with Phillips LED floods. My first experiment with LEDs was in the 5-bulb chandelier in our dining room which was on a dimmer. I found some CREE bulbs on sale, but when they dimmed they buzzed very loudly and were quite annoying. Searching online, I found a lot of reviews that complained of the same problem and recommended the Phillips bulbs instead, so I tried those and they work about as perfectly as I can hope for. There's a slight buzz when they are turned down, but you have to be sitting directly beneath them with nearly dead quiet in order to hear the buzz. The jarring thing about dimming LEDs when we first started using them is that they don't change color as they dim, like incandescent bulbs do. So you don't get that low, warm, yellow glow from them that we were used to in the room. But now, we don't even notice the color... I've also got several of those Phillips slim LEDs around the house that I got for a great deal through a Puget Sound Energy coupon... My latest LED adventure (aside from the outdoor fixtures) was with the 3-way wall-lamps in our living room. The lamps are 150W max (50/100/150), and the only 150W-equivalent bulbs I could find were $50 bucks each (though that's better than the $80 bucks that they cost about 6 months to a year ago). So finally after getting some extra birthday cash from my family, I bit the bullet and bought two of the $50 150W 3-way bulbs. I know it sounds crazy, but I was absolutely sick and tired of swapping out the 3-way incandescents every few weeks when they would quickly blow out one or both of their filaments. And I'm also hoping that these will last for years beyond those incandescents, to make the price worth it. They work well, thought they are huge, in size and don't fit within the standard lamp harp... After those, I decided to replace some other 3-way bulbs with the much more affordable Phillips 100W-equivalent LEDs. They aren't quite as bright, but otherwise, they work just as well.

 

I've still got a couple more canister lights and random closet and office lamp bulbs to swap out. But I'll get to them eventually. The next LED bulb purchase will probably be four 60W- or 100W-equivalent bulbs to install in our new bathroom lighting fixture after we repaint the bathroom.

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