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schoondoggy

Replacing three and four way light switching with the Z-wave

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schoondoggy

Today is the day I broke down and started the hard work of changing my old light switches over to GE Z-wave switches, 45609 and 45610. I will never claim to be an expert but I know a whole lot more about three in four way wiring than I did this morning. My first recommendation to anyone working on this process is to pull off the switch covers pull out the switches and look at how they're wired. My house was built in 1978 and they did three-way and four way switching much differently back then. At first the hallway three-way switch was pretty baffling to me until I saw this graphic online:

m1wy.jpg

The only difference in my case it was the white wire carrying voltage back to complete the circuit was not black striped. This type of wiring concerns me, and is a good example why you can never just assume white wires are neutral and not hot. To get this circuit ready to be wired with Z-wave switches I had to pull down the light fixture and make changes. The four way circuit in my other hall was more traditional:

2jdm.jpg

In this case I did not need to change anything at the fixture, just at the switches. Here is the proper way to wire GE Z-wave:

3k9v.png

Keep in mind the main switch, 45609 is the only switch carrying power, the 45610 are just toggling the main switch.

A good meter is a must. If you are not comfortable with wiring, hire an electrician.

If you have questions I would be happy to try to help.

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cskenney

It looked like in one of the pictures you have on image shack that there was black electrical tape wrapped around the white wire at the light fixture.  This is how I have seen a neutral wire identified that has been reassigned as a hot wire.  The same wire on the opposite end should have also been wrapped in tape to be correct.  Often times if power is routed to a ceiling fixture and then a switch is needed to control it, a single run of romex is run from the fixture down to the switch location.  In this case the black and white wires are both hot (and should be marked as such).

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schoondoggy

Correct, but in my case there was no marking tape at the switch end, it did have black tape at the fixture end.

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schoondoggy

The hardest part of this process is fitting the new switch in these shallow old wall boxes. Try to use as few wire nuts as possible and keep them small.

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ImTheTypeOfGuy

I have done this several times and these diagrams are great. Excellent post.

 

Sent from my Lumia Icon via Tapatalk

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AquaDyne

I'm contemplating the same thing and understand how my existing 3- and 4-way switches are wired, but I can't make out your Z-wave diagram (it's too small).  Can you elaborate (even just in text description) how the Z-wave switches are installed?  Do you put the 45609 on the line side or load side?  How do the 45610's get power?

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schoondoggy

Page 6 in this guide shows the use of the GE 45609 and 45610 for 3 and 4 way switching:

http://www.jascoproducts.com/support/manual-downloads/applications/DocumentLibraryManager/upload/45609-Manual-Eng.pdf

The 45609 is the switch, the 45610 actually do not carry power or use power. The 45610 only needs the traveler and neutral connections.

Here is a 3 way:

03qf.png

Here is the 4 way:

m1cl.png

Here is the back of the 45609:

0whc.png

 

As I stated in the first post, I had to change the wiring at the fixture for one of my 3 ways. The other circuits only required changes at the outlets. 

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TimothyWMurray

I have the GE Jasco 45613 3-way dimmer switch kit And I am confused.

 

First of all the Dimmer has only Load, Line and Traveler (no neutral) second the Aux has only neutral and traveler.  

But I have tree wires at each end.  I have not sorted the exact way that it is wired, but I can not even really understand how it should be wired.

 

I know which black is the line, but each end has red black and white.  Five years ago when we bought the house I replaced one end of this with a Dimmer and that was fine as it had a line and 2 travelers.

But if the other end has three wires and the aux switch has two terminals...? I must need to make one of the travelers hot or something... ?   Argh.  I'm not usually this confused 

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schoondoggy

It can be confusing. If you are not comfortable, play it safe and hire a electrician.

Look at some of the diagrams at the top of this post. In your existing circuits electricity runs through all switches. In these new switches the main switch does all the work. The secondary switch just talks to the main. It carries no electricity.

Here is the manual:

http://www.jascoproducts.com/support/manual-downloads/applications/DocumentLibraryManager/upload/45612_45613-terminals-Eng-Manual.pdf

 

Here is page 10 from the manual:

fipf.png

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guitartexan

What you have here is referred to as a "California" threway circuit. In it, you use a regular 12/3romex for both travelers as well as the neutral as a hot. Cheaper that running the extra 12/2 Romex for the power leg.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

What you have here is referred to as a "California" threway circuit. In it, you use a regular 12/3romex for both travelers as well as the neutral as a hot. Cheaper that running the extra 12/2 Romex for the power leg.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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