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Docking Station Issue With External Displays


logan1323
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We have several Surface Pro 2's deployed at my company that all use docking stations. Every so often, and there doesn't seem to be a rhyme or reason to it, the external monitors hooked up to the dock will lose all display capabilities.

I've tried restarting the surface, checking the monitor connections, and running windows updates and made sure all drivers were up to date and current. (Example of one that happened the other day was that one monitor still worked but the other would not. I would go into the Screen Resolution dialogue box and try turning the screen back on but after applying the settings the screen would automatically turn back off. )

The only thing I found to fix the problem is undocking the Surface, unplugging power from the dock, plug the power back in and then re-dock the device. After following these steps the monitors will work fine again.

Like I said, this is an intermittent issue and is hard to replicate but was wondering if this was a known problem or if there is any known fix for it out there??

Thanks in advance for the help.

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I ran into the same issue with a few Surface Pro 1's and the docking station. The only solution that I found that works is to un-dock, power cycle the docking station and re-dock.

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