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NateDawg1148

My router Sucks

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cskenney

I also have a DIR-655. It has been pretty reliable. I replaced a Linksys WRT54G that needed to be rebooted every other day. I also purchased a DIR4500 gaming router and used that for a short time until I thought a lightning strike damaged it.

 

If you are running G and N devices in your house you really might want to consider a true dual band router.

 

The comments (good and bad) on the Netgear wndr3700 are interesting. MaximumPC seems to be in love with that router.

 

I also agree to uses switches for your hard wired network instead of routing through the ports on the router.

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dvn
I also agree to uses switches for your hard wired network instead of routing through the ports on the router.

OK. Enough people have said this so I'll give it a shot. If this cures it, I'll be grateful because it sure is annoying.

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NateDawg1148

I bought the 655 today. Thanks again everyone for the feedback. So far so good with the exception that It would not allow me to copy over my existing setting for the 625 and port them over.

 

but, I dont mind :)

 

Nate.

 

 

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SabatonFan80

I'm using a Netgear WNR3500 and it is annoying the heck out of me. Every few days, I have to power it off for a minute because I can't connect to my WHS. I can ping the WHS, sure, but cannot RDP or access via the console. This router is only about a year old, so I'm not too impressed with that.

Just curious.. were you able to use 192.168.x.x IPs with your router? The *only* range that the WNDR3700 would let me use was 10.0.*.*. (which was annoying as all hell because I had to reconfigure every static IP on the network (twelve devices) to work it...)

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dvn

Just curious.. were you able to use 192.168.x.x IPs with your router? The *only* range that the WNDR3700 would let me use was 10.0.*.*. (which was annoying as all hell because I had to reconfigure every static IP on the network (twelve devices) to work it...)

Yes. 192.168.1.x internal IP's with a few devices - WHS, my desktop PC, HTPC, another desktop PC - configured to use Address Reservation (in the LAN setup page), instead of static IP config. This morning, I reconfigured my network so the router feeds a gigabit switch. Now all wired PC's run through the switch. I'll see how that works.

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usacomp2k3

Just curious.. were you able to use 192.168.x.x IPs with your router? The *only* range that the WNDR3700 would let me use was 10.0.*.*. (which was annoying as all hell because I had to reconfigure every static IP on the network (twelve devices) to work it...)

Why do you have so many static IP's? Don't trust DHCP? What about IP reservation?

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dvn

For me, Address Reservation (AR) was something you guys told me about a few months back. Until then, I had always configured a static IP, when necessary, for the adapter and then made the corresponding settings in the router. AR is really only necessary for WHS because of remote access and port forwarding, but I didn't think there was any harm in using AR for other PC's on the network. Is there?

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usacomp2k3

No harm, just no real benefit. And if you are using UPNP, no need for static on the WHS either (I'm not, so I do have a static address assigned). I have my HP printer with a reserved IP, and everything else in the house is DHCP.

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dvn

Really? I didn't know UPnP covered port forwarding. I always thought you needed a static IP for that.

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jmwills

.As long as you create a reservation for a specific IP, statically set IP's are not necessar. Speaking of reservations for printers, at work we use the DNS name for creating the port so no matter which VLAN a device gets moved to, the DNS name is constant so no need to create a new port for the new IP. One less headache to deal with since DNS is carried over DHCP.

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