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Upgrading Surface Pro 2


Nickolai
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Has anyone tried (or thought of) upgrading Surface Pro 2? CPU, RAM or SSD.

 

I had this crazy idea that I could probably put an i7 CPU in SP2 with the help of a specialized company that does this kind of things; and while I'm at it, maybe replace SSD and RAM as well (I have the most concern for the RAM: I'm afraid larger RAM should have different bank organization and therefore not compatible)

 

  • CPU candidates I have in mind are i7-4600U (CPU upgrade), i7-4650U (CPU+GPU upgrade) or i7-4610Y (energy economy upgrade).
  • There are mSATA SSD's up to 1 TB, at least.
  • It's trickier with RAM - according to CPU datasheet, it supports up to 8 GB RAM per channel, which means that if the board is designed for single-channel configuration, I can't go above 8 GB.

 

The idea can seem crazy, but with the computer enthusiasts doing various crazy things to their computers, I thought I'd give it a thought. After all, if there are people who think of such things, where should I find such individuals if not on SurfaceGeeks forums? I know for a fact that they do such things e.g. with Apple hardware, and I've talked to a manager from a local repair company that has experience with Apple hardware, but they have no experience with Surface (Pro) devices, and this is important. I'm still yet to find a company that does this kind of thing with Surface professionally.

 

What do you think?

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the only thing I would attempt would be the storage upgrade, beyond the current processor means less battery/heat and I personally wouldn't risk it unless you don't care about those things. I believe you have to use a heat gun to remove the display/ open the surface tablet. I would search youtube before attempting any of this

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beyond the current processor means less battery/heat

I'm not sure exactly what you are saying here: do you mean to say that upgrading CPU may be detrimental because the upgrade will draw more power and produce more heat? That's not necessarily true, though there are drawbacks indeed:

  • i7-4610Y is more power-efficient than stock (11.5W TDP) at about the same CPU performance and lower GPU performance
  • i7-4600U has more CPU performance at the same TDP (15W)
  • i7-4650U has more CPU and GPU performance at the same TDP (15W), but CPU frequency is lower than not as high as in i7-4600U, and non-turbo frequency is lower still; lower than stock, even. Does it hint that this part is potentially more power-hungry, even though TDP is the same? Will it hit thermal wall often and turn out to be actually slower in non-GPU tasks?
Also I heard that as process matures, the chips that come from the fab actually become more and more power-efficient within the same power bin, so generally speaking, newer chips tend to be better.

 

Check out the IFIXIT teardown review, it shows some good images of screen removal, and internals as teardown continues.  They also touch on many other risks and concerns.

https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/Microsoft+Surface+Pro+2+Teardown/18604/

 

I saw that, thanks. It shows that Surface Pro 2 got the lowest possible repairability score: 1. I imagine they will give 0 if they fail to disassemble the thing at all. iPad Air got 2 and MacBook Air got 4.

That must make things harder for the repair company, but I hope that there are folks with the skills and equipment required to handle it. I hoped that iFixit could do it, as their teardowns and guides look to me an awful lot like and advertisement for just this kind of service. Alas, they only sell tools.

I would like to stress that I don't feel nowhere near competent to do this myself; I need to find someone with the necessary tools and expertise to do this for me; preferably the company that already did it. I found a local repair company that does this kind of things, but they only have experience with Apple equipment, and know Apple's pitfalls.

 

Not worth the effort or the cost.

 

When has this stopped the enthusiasts? :P

Or rather, the benefit here is determined by the individial; why couldn't it be worth the cost for someone.

I don't see why at least some enthusiasts wouldn't want to try this, even if it looks a little 'over-the-top'. But, if I won't find someone with experience of upgrading Surface Pro 2 specifically, I agree that this is a risky proposition that I'll be not willing to try.

 

Now, if will at all be able to find an enthusiast who executed or attempted such upgrade, I believe they should be here. Has anyone did it?

Edited by Nickolai
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I'm not sure exactly what you are saying here: do you mean to say that upgrading CPU may be detrimental because the upgrade will draw more power and produce more heat? That's not necessarily true, though there are drawbacks indeed:

  • i7-4610Y is more power-efficient than stock (11.5W TDP) at about the same CPU performance and lower GPU performance
  • i7-4600U has more CPU performance at the same TDP (15W)
  • i7-4650U has more CPU and GPU performance at the same TDP (15W), but CPU frequency is lower than not as high as in i7-4600U, and non-turbo frequency is lower still; lower than stock, even. Does it hint that this part is potentially more power-hungry, even though TDP is the same? Will it hit thermal wall often and turn out to be actually slower in non-GPU tasks?
Also I heard that as process matures, the chips that come from the fab actually become more and more power-efficient within the same power bin, so generally speaking, newer chips tend to be better.

 

 

I saw that, thanks. It shows that Surface Pro 2 got the lowest possible repairability score: 1. I imagine they will give 0 if they fail to disassemble the thing at all. iPad Air got 2 and MacBook Air got 4.

That must make things harder for the repair company, but I hope that there are folks with the skills and equipment required to handle it. I hoped that iFixit could do it, as their teardowns and guides look to me an awful lot like and advertisement for just this kind of service. Alas, they only sell tools.

I would like to stress that I don't feel nowhere near competent to do this myself; I need to find someone with the necessary tools and expertise to do this for me; preferably the company that already did it. I found a local repair company that does this kind of things, but they only have experience with Apple equipment, and know Apple's pitfalls.

 

 

When has this stopped the enthusiasts? :P

Or rather, the benefit here is determined by the individial; why couldn't it be worth the cost for someone.

I don't see why at least some enthusiasts wouldn't want to try this, even if it looks a little 'over-the-top'. But, if I won't find someone with experience of upgrading Surface Pro 2 specifically, I agree that this is a risky proposition that I'll be not willing to try.

 

Now, if will at all be able to find an enthusiast who executed or attempted such upgrade, I believe they should be here. Has anyone did it?

 

if your not really getting a performance boost(by the info you posted and checking benchmarks) why bother? To me tablets are going to have a faster turn over than pc's did, I would rather save the money and buy faster tech when it becomes available

Edited by callihan44
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Has anyone tried (or thought of) upgrading Surface Pro 2? CPU, RAM or SSD.

 

I had this crazy idea that I could probably put an i7 CPU in SP2 with the help of a specialized company that does this kind of things; and while I'm at it, maybe replace SSD and RAM as well (I have the most concern for the RAM: I'm afraid larger RAM should have different bank organization and therefore not compatible)

 

  • CPU candidates I have in mind are i7-4600U (CPU upgrade), i7-4650U (CPU+GPU upgrade) or i7-4610Y (energy economy upgrade).
  • There are mSATA SSD's up to 1 TB, at least.
  • It's trickier with RAM - according to CPU datasheet, it supports up to 8 GB RAM per channel, which means that if the board is designed for single-channel configuration, I can't go above 8 GB.

 

The idea can seem crazy, but with the computer enthusiasts doing various crazy things to their computers, I thought I'd give it a thought. After all, if there are people who think of such things, where should I find such individuals if not on SurfaceGeeks forums? I know for a fact that they do such things e.g. with Apple hardware, and I've talked to a manager from a local repair company that has experience with Apple hardware, but they have no experience with Surface (Pro) devices, and this is important. I'm still yet to find a company that does this kind of thing with Surface professionally.

 

What do you think?

As far as I can see in the tear down, the mSATA SSD is the only thing that is in socket, so it is the only replaceable item.

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