Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)

Help with new 3-SLI or 4-SLI board


mrossco
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest no-control

I'm going to blatantly ignore what was discussed above for the most part. Not to disregard it, it's off topic and not really viable, but I have my own opinion and views so let's entertain it to get the what-if's out of the way.

 

First point is that 1156 is a dead socket. So unless you're willing to build this in February/March when the sandybridge 1155 socket comes out it a moot point. The P55 chipset features isn't going to cut it for this application. In all honesty if your looking to run a multi-GPU setup, especially if you are going with more than 2 cards, x58/1366 is the only way to go. You get the benefits of triple channel RAM and gain access hexacore Intel chips. Not to mention a socket that will be viable through 2011. Improving scalability and options.

 

Unless this is a complete business write off I wouldn't consider Quadro or Tesla. I use CAD and while I can get optimized drivers and it's great, they fall flat for gaming, optimized drivers for games are scarce. There's no guarantee you will get those driver benefits for your use. For the cost of 3 of the quadro cards you could build 2 systems. Or a dual socket 1366 6 way SLi system. Using the WS class card is not compelling model for your use for the most part.

 

Now for the original post...

 

If you prefer GigaByte the UD9 is a perfect fit. The UD5 or UD3R might be better for the budget if the options work for you.

 

For Asus the P6T7 WS is nice but the P6T6 WS is better bang for the buck

 

eVGA classified boards are pretty solid, but are more gaming than WS. The sole exception would be the SR-2 which offers scalability should you need the RAM and CPU

 

If I were building it I would plunk down for the SR-2 with the UD9 a close second.

 

If you're going to water cool adding a full cover block for the mosfet/NB/SB is just a BMP at this point and only adds $150 to the budget. Somewhere in there you mentioned $3000 I don't think you're going to be able to do 3-way watercooling. My numbers run down was at best $3500 with 3 470's going with 3 480s adds $480 ironically.

 

You will need 2 loops minimum just to dump all the heat.

 

This sounds like a really awesome build.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

*BUMP*

 

OK, some time has gone by, but this project is still on my radar. I recently rewired some of my outlets in my home so my office is now on its own dedicated circuit. I'm putting the finishing touches on my dedicated Hyper-V box to run all my work-related VMS (SharePoint, SQL Server, Linux, Informatica, etc.) Thanks to a recent case purchase from no-control, I've rebuilt my office PC back to Windows 7 with my nephew who is now excited that he may be getting the PC later this year. So, as far as I can tell, here's my options for building a tri-SLI rig for the purposes of CUDA development...

 

1) Scrounge up i7 parts that are coming down in price thanks to Sandybridge. I've settled on an ASUS Supercomputer board if I went this route, though the EVGA offerings looked promising.

 

2) Wait until the summer for Sandybridge 1155 boards to settle down in price a bit and pull the trigger on a Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD7. I was reading the specs on their site, and my mouth started to water.

 

3) Wait until the fall/winter timeframe to see what socket 2011 brings. I keep thinking of that Best Buy commercial, and I don't want to be that guy smacking himself on the forehead when he sees the 4D tv ad on the side of the delivery truck that brought him his 3D tv.

 

No matter what route I go, I'd like to build this rig ala the "Today Show" wedding plans. At each decision-point, I'd like to throw something out on these forums and solicit feedback. I tend to overplan my builds, because aside from the occasional upgrade, my systems tend to stay in service for a number of years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you have multiple GPU's do you get additional benefit over having just one? If you do, does the benefit decrease significantly as you add each one?

 

 

I am going to get an Alienware machine once they are back out with the Sandybridge boards. I wish they would just sell the cases and then I would build my own.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you have multiple GPU's do you get additional benefit over having just one? If you do, does the benefit decrease significantly as you add each one?

 

It really depends what you want to use it for and what motherboard you're going to use it in. I guess the short answer is if you're not sure, then you're likely better off buying the best single-card solution your budget can handle. Given today's games, 2-SLI is beneficial if you're looking at screens larger than 24" or gaming across multiple monitors. 3-SLI is for the very serious. In most cases, as you add more GPUs on your motherboard, the bandwidth available to each individual card can decrease from x16 to x8.

 

The rest, I'll leave to the BYOB guys.

 

For my purposes, I specifically want 3-SLI as the presence of additional GPUs overrides any penalty incured in PCI-E bandwidth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess I should have been more specific. I do not game so no interest for that application. I was asking for video editing purposes. I do a lot of editing with avi files over 20 GB's and over 35,000 kbps and was wondering if the two GPU's with CUDA technology would be beneficial.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was asking for video editing purposes.

 

In that case, the answer is probably. I would start with chosing your software, and then see if multi-GPU will be beneficial. Most makers of video editing software offer some kind of forums where users can discuss such things.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...