Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)

Optimize network performance


DutchWHS
 Share

Recommended Posts

I recently upgraded my network speed to 1Gbps, by adding a new switch (Cisco LM-008).

The speed went up quite a bit, in the old days copying a DVD to my server would take about 35 minutes (yawn) and now only a bit over 2. From that perspective the upgrade was well worth it.

 

Even though I like the speed improvement I think the network could be quicker yet. I checked the server network usage (in task manager) during file transfer and noticed it goes up and down quite a bit during the transfer - usually there are peaks to about 50% and then it drops back to around 25%. The average speeds I get are around 30Mb/sec (reported by the file copy process in win7).

 

My server is an HP EX490 Mediasmart Server and I'm using CAT5e cables - I guess some of the loss could be in the cables but I'm nore sure how much that would be.

 

I'm hoping to see some feedback from the user-base on what you're effective network speeds are and whether you have changed anything in the NIC settings or drivers to improve the default speeds.

 

Thanks in advance for your feedback!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 28
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • usacomp2k3

    4

  • dvn

    4

  • DutchWHS

    10

  • kermi

    4

From my experience, if the cable is bad, it'll drop down to 100mbps right away. What you're seeing in terms of spikes is something that I see when copying lots of small files and is normal. Do you get anything more consistent with a .iso or something like that?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with usacomp2k3 on bad cable however how long are you cable runs? There is a difference between the two cable types which typically show up more on longer runs. IF you suspect the cable, get a couple of premade Cat 6 patch cord and temporarily replace your cabling with the patch cords. That should tell you whether or not it is cable. 30 Mbs during a file copy is abit slow depending on the file size. I am getting about 85-90 on a large (10-30 gig) file. I also recently found a 10% increase be changing switches. My suggestion is to try the cable first then report back. Make sure that no other devices (other than the PC and server) are attached to the switches for the test.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of the reasons for the frankly crappy networking performance on gigabit networks is, that WHSv1 uses SMBv1, which pretty much sucks for anything above 100Mbit speeds.

 

Vail, on the other hand, being based on Server2008 R2, uses SMBv2 protocoll for networking, which is significantly better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you get anything more consistent with a .iso or something like that?

No, I get the same when I copy an ISO file - max speed I've seen here is around 50Mb/sec.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with usacomp2k3 on bad cable however how long are you cable runs?

 

Maximum length is about 10 meters - my main PC is on the second floor while my server is downstairs. Before I set this up, I used two standard cables (also CAT5e I think) and got the same speeds. I purchased 200m of CAT5e cable and a bunch of connectors so I can connect my machines myself.

You're right, I can try switching to CAT6 for a test. If that makes a big difference it may be worth investigating the investment (cable, connectors, tooling) to switch to that... Thanks for the suggestion.

Edited by DutchWHS
Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of the reasons for the frankly crappy networking performance on gigabit networks is, that WHSv1 uses SMBv1, which pretty much sucks for anything above 100Mbit speeds.

 

Vail, on the other hand, being based on Server2008 R2, uses SMBv2 protocoll for networking, which is significantly better.

 

kermi, could you expand on the advantages of SMBv2? This is the first I've heard of this. Google, here I come. :)

 

*Cat5E will support theoretical transfer rates of 125MB/s. So if you're only getting 30MB/s, factors like small file size, slow HDD speed, or even a virus scanner looking the files over could be at work. A busy processor on the server will also impede transfer rates.

 

Cat6 is less susceptible to interference which can reduce transmission speeds because it has more twists per inch than Cat5e. Regardless, in today's gigabit network, Cat5e and Cat6 speeds are essentially the same.

Edited by dvn
clarification
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just to confirm, that's megabits, not megabytes, right?

No, that's megabytes per second. So a 4500 MB file (DVD Iso image) takes about 120 seconds to copy to the server, which is about 38 MB/s.

 

I used incorrect case in my initial post (Mb instead of MB), sorry for the confusion!

Edited by DutchWHS
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well that's really not too bad. Still about 4x faster than you'll get via 100mbps. What hard drive do you have on both ends. If either is a 5400 or EIDE, that could be slowing you up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×
×
  • Create New...