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Windows Rt: Should The Desktop Exist?


theprawn
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Until their is a full "Modern" version of office, the desktop needs to exist.  As noted it is also the only place to get to many of the settings, file manager, etc.  As this device grows, I expect the desktop to leave RT. It just can't happen yet as it is needed for too many things. 

 

Should it exist, No! 

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I suspect many of the admin functions that one would typically use from the Desktop will get incorporated into the Metro interface. In fact, many of them can be added to the Metro interface, at least on the Pro.

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I would think that use of the Desktop will become less and less the longer you own a Surface or any Windows 8 touch machine.

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Yes, I agree it took many years and revisions before you saw DOS removed from Windows.  The influence of DOS is still in windows and in some cases you still drop down to a command prompt.  You don't see that ever really being removed, but my point is that people used to live in DOS and then they started Windows.  You then saw the same thing as now people spent more time in DOS and some things you just had to do in DOS.  Then over time DOS faded and now unless you are a power user you really never go into DOS (AKA the command prompt) as a typical user.  I expect that the new modern UI will work much the same as this... only I do see this being accelerated by Microsoft due to competition that really wasn't that threatening back in the days of the DOS / Windows time frame.  I grew up through this and I think the biggest issue is that it was the early years of computing and now we have tons of people that use our products.  I really think that is good and bad.  Good because we have influence in the market, however it is bad because you have now got tons of people that use your products that don't like change, however they do like to think the grass is greener on the other side.  They accept change when they decide to change hence the acceptance of the Mac or even Android, but they accept they must learn something new because to them it is new.

 

Imagine if you woke up one morning and your toaster still toasted toast, but had a few new buttons on it and the ones that you knew about were moved.  Someone had changed the light and dark settings to be too much.  You got up every morning and just put toast in and pushed down the lever, but now you have to go in and figure this out.  You didn't go buy a new toaster this happened suddenly to the one you love and know.  Now imagine the one you owned broke and you were forced to buy a new one.  You expect change and you might even look for one slightly more complex and agree that the features of the new toaster were awesome.  It still makes toast and it makes it the same, but you didn't think that change was bad in that scenario and you embraced it.  Maybe even read a manual to understand the new one.  This is the problem for Windows... your expectations are set, but not so with competitors.  I think this is the fundamental issue in the market in general for Microsoft.  If we are early to the market as we are on touch for desktop OS then we are perceived as to early and the pioneer (not as an innovator).  If we let others be the pioneer then we are too late is the perception of the market.

 

This is an interesting challenge and one that I hope will work its way out in time.  The good thing is that Microsoft survived this with the transition from DOS to Windows Desktop.  I believe it will be one that we survive for the Desktop to Touch Enable UI.

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I've seen a lot of changes since I wrote my first program in '65: from banana plug boards, to punch cards and tape, to DECwriters, to terminals and, today, personal computers. I'm sure touch UIs will evolve and take over, just like everything else in the past. No doubt, someone is working even now on whatever will take over from touch.

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Yes, I agree it took many years and revisions before you saw DOS removed from Windows. The influence of DOS is still in windows and in some cases you still drop down to a command prompt. You don't see that ever really being removed, but my point is that people used to live in DOS and then they started Windows. You then saw the same thing as now people spent more time in DOS and some things you just had to do in DOS. Then over time DOS faded and now unless you are a power user you really never go into DOS (AKA the command prompt) as a typical user. I expect that the new modern UI will work much the same as this... only I do see this being accelerated by Microsoft due to competition that really wasn't that threatening back in the days of the DOS / Windows time frame. I grew up through this and I think the biggest issue is that it was the early years of computing and now we have tons of people that use our products. I really think that is good and bad. Good because we have influence in the market, however it is bad because you have now got tons of people that use your products that don't like change, however they do like to think the grass is greener on the other side. They accept change when they decide to change hence the acceptance of the Mac or even Android, but they accept they must learn something new because to them it is new.

 

Imagine if you woke up one morning and your toaster still toasted toast, but had a few new buttons on it and the ones that you knew about were moved. Someone had changed the light and dark settings to be too much. You got up every morning and just put toast in and pushed down the lever, but now you have to go in and figure this out. You didn't go buy a new toaster this happened suddenly to the one you love and know. Now imagine the one you owned broke and you were forced to buy a new one. You expect change and you might even look for one slightly more complex and agree that the features of the new toaster were awesome. It still makes toast and it makes it the same, but you didn't think that change was bad in that scenario and you embraced it. Maybe even read a manual to understand the new one. This is the problem for Windows... your expectations are set, but not so with competitors. I think this is the fundamental issue in the market in general for Microsoft. If we are early to the market as we are on touch for desktop OS then we are perceived as to early and the pioneer (not as an innovator). If we let others be the pioneer then we are too late is the perception of the market.

 

This is an interesting challenge and one that I hope will work its way out in time. The good thing is that Microsoft survived this with the transition from DOS to Windows Desktop. I believe it will be one that we survive for the Desktop to Touch Enable UI.

Very well written.

 

I've seen a lot of changes since I wrote my first program in '65: from banana plug boards, to punch cards and tape, to DECwriters, to terminals and, today, personal computers. I'm sure touch UIs will evolve and take over, just like everything else in the past. No doubt, someone is working even now on whatever will take over from touch.

Ummmm, you my friend are old. ; )

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Ummmm, you my friend are old. ; )

 

Indeed I am. I will admit, however, that I was pretty young when I wrote my first program ;)

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I like the desktop, and I spend a lot of time there. I do a lot of Excel and Word document creation/editing on my Surface RT, and I don't have the disconnect some do between the new start menu and the old desktop. For some web browsing, I prefer the desktop IE version, and it is convenient not to have to move off the desktop if I need to use Bing while I am writing. It is incredibly handy to have such a lightweight device that makes it so easy to bring Office apps with me. For me, the RT is a hybrid device--on one hand it is great for amusement and entertainment and on the other, it works smart on the job for email and notes, in addition to the Office suite.

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