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How to stack multiple servers?


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Hello I'm new here

 

I woukd like to know the best way free or low cost to use multiple servers as one server for virtualisation..

 

Example: lets say I have 2 physical server 8 cores 8gb ram 1tb storage. And I want to make it run together to have 16 cores 16gb ram 2tb storage or redundant storage.. and a month later adding another server to have 24 cores etc...

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Like a supercomputer? I don't think it's possible... at least not using commodity servers and applying the concept I think you're implying. Ie. Running say, a single Windows Server logical instance with its footprint spread across different physical hosts. I am not an authority but even I can see how that can be extremely sub-optimal. You'd need a reasonably fast and latency-free interconnection between different CPUs and RAM within the 'farm'. For most servers, the NICs will be the only way they'll be able to talk to each other and relatively speaking, they're slow (what with ethernet frame overhead and whatnot) compared to communications confined inside a physical system board.

 

For that reason, scaling out by clustering is way more popular and preferred.

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yeah I understand that.. maybe been able to manage all servers like one big server and spead virtual machine in multiple servers.. could have more than 1tb storage but not more processing power and ram than a physical server can provide.. who can even "maybe" transfer a virtual machine from one physical server to another one automaticaly if needed. 

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jmwills

"I would like to know the best way free or low cost to use multiple servers as one server for virtualisation."  When you find the "free or low cost method", let me know. 

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yeah I understand that.. maybe been able to manage all servers like one big server and spead virtual machine in multiple servers.. could have more than 1tb storage but not more processing power and ram than a physical server can provide.. who can even "maybe" transfer a virtual machine from one physical server to another one automaticaly if needed.

 

Moving VMs from one physical host to another is possible. On VMWare, it's called VMotion and it uses VSphere. On Hyper-V, it's called Live Migration and it typically requires System Center to have orchestration and automation.

 

Neither is free, or at the least, low cost.

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schoondoggy

In the not free category, I think Hyper Convergence platforms like Nutanix, Simplivity, Pivot3 and Vmware vSAN would do what you are looking to do. Systems/servers are connected with multiple 10GbE connections so that all nodes in a cluster act as one. Resources can be allocated physically or over subscription is supported. Each platform has their own set of limitations. Microsoft has played into the area a bit:

https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/windowsserver/2016/10/24/microsoft-and-intel-squeezed-hyper-convergence-into-the-overhead-bin/

For free I would look at expiremanting with StarWind's free version:

https://www.starwindsoftware.com/starwind-virtual-san-free

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ShadowPeo

I am going to defer to shoondoggy on the hyper-convergence factor as it is not something I have got into as my clients have not gone down that path. The only similar thing I can comment on is failover clusters, which can divide the load over multiple servers, but each server is still independent for failover reasons, and this for your average punter is not going to be cheap or free. That and one piece of advice about failover clusters. When the do fail, they are a right bitch to get running again, they become a failover, and over, and over cluster

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