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schoondoggy

2.5GbE/5GbE over copper RJ45

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schoondoggy

I think if I search the interwebs I could find posts where I said this would never happen, never say never:

First motherboard I have seen with a 5GbE interface:

http://www.asrock.com/mb/AMD/Fatal1ty%20X370%20Professional%20Gaming/index.us.asp

Ethernet chip from these guys:

http://www.aquantia.com/

Unfortunately, the only company I see talking about switches is Cisco.

 

Nbase-t seems to be driving the effort:

http://www.nbaset.org/

 

Another driver for this is WAP's. WiFi data rates are on the verge of surpassing 1GbE, 2.5GbE or 5GbE would give a WAP a faster path to the core.

 

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Dave

Man that mobo looks sweet.  It's interesting to see this as I would love to get into higher GbE speeds.  CAT 6 I assume?

 

I wonder if this helps push 10Gbe prices lower?


Yikes - http://fave.co/2mfNmzK

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schoondoggy

I think they are talking 2.5GbE over Cat5e and 5GbE over Cat6, I need to confirm.

It should help bring down 10GbE pricing, but I think the really play/motivation is the performance boost over existing copper wire. There is a spec for 10GbE over Cat6a, but the 10GbE momentum is around SFP+ connections.

WAP's could really drive this. Connectivity from the WAP to the core has become an issue as WiFi standards have gotten faster. If a WAP manufacturer could offer a 2.5/5GbE connection back to the core with existing cable, that would be huge.

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nrf

seems like it fits well into the 'my wap gives more than 1gbps thruput' scenario. I wonder how long it will take to become mainstream...

(although teaming would be another possibility)

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ShadowPeo

Man that mobo looks sweet.  It's interesting to see this as I would love to get into higher GbE speeds.  CAT 6 I assume?

 

I wonder if this helps push 10Gbe prices lower?

Yikes - http://fave.co/2mfNmzK

 

 

I think they are talking 2.5GbE over Cat5e and 5GbE over Cat6, I need to confirm.

It should help bring down 10GbE pricing, but I think the really play/motivation is the performance boost over existing copper wire. There is a spec for 10GbE over Cat6a, but the 10GbE momentum is around SFP+ connections.

WAP's could really drive this. Connectivity from the WAP to the core has become an issue as WiFi standards have gotten faster. If a WAP manufacturer could offer a 2.5/5GbE connection back to the core with existing cable, that would be huge.

 

*THIS IS NOT MY ORIGINAL RESPONSE - THAT DISAPPEARED INTO THE ETHER, I APOLIGISE IF IT SHOWS UP AND I DOUBLE POST*

 

A: Yes it is designed to run over 5e/6 - I will still continue to recommend and where possible install 6A though, as it is shielded and capable of 10GBE

 

B:10GBE pricing should reduce, or rather what I have seen happening is cheaper implementation coming to market from the lower end manufacturers. The higher-end stuff is staying as it is, partly because as schoondoggy stated, it is mostly SFP+ and used over fibre for backbone links. Servers tend to use Twin-Ax cabling for their 10GBE connectivity which is two SFP+ units connected via the twin-ax cable as a single unit so you order them in the length you want. I do know a couple of servers using it over fibre (OM3) links but these are VEEAM backup servers that are in separate buildings physically but logically connected straight to the core of the network with the rest of the servers logically.

 

C: Again as schoondoggy said, I can see this being great for WAP's especially where it is not physically or economically possible to replace the old 5e/6 data cabling. We have been looking at them for a build at the end of the year which is 300+ data points, with 80 Dual-homed WAP's with the current design, if the manufacturers end up releasing some WAP's that can make use of it in the timeframe we have this will certainly be considered an option

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Ikon-TNG

I found this Netgear switch, if all you want is multigigabit speed, and don't need/want to pay for management: https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-10-Gigabit-Multi-Gigabit-Unmanaged-Rackmount/dp/B075Q66RKF/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1516053895&sr=8-1&keywords=xs508m

 

However, $600 is a bit rich for me, so I guess I'm stuck with 1Gb for the foreseeable.

 

On 4/7/2017 at 1:08 AM, schoondoggy said:

And Buffalo enters the market multi gigabit switch:

http://www.buffalotech.com/products/multi-gigabit-ethernet-switch

 

Looks like this has disappeared.

Edited by Ikon-TNG

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schoondoggy

Currently, the market for the 2.5GbE and 5GbE is for applications that need to continue using existing Cat 5 cabling, like WAP's. If you need something faster that 1GbE, a few ports of 10GbE can be very affordable, as long as you do not need too long of a cable:

For $300 you can get sixteen 1Gbe RJ45 ports, two 1GbE SFP ports and two 10Gbe SFP+ ports:

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833127544&cm_re=dlink_dgs-1510-_-33-127-544-_-Product

Several choices for 10GbE NIC's. You can generally find these for $30-$40:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Mellanox-MCX311A-XCAT-10-Gigabit-Ethernet-PCIe-Adapter-Card-ConnectX-3-MCX311A/173128627280?epid=11010663791&hash=item284f453450:g:KOAAAOSwsCFZpefe

Three meter 10GbE Twinax cables start around $10:

https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odkw=sfp%2B+cable&_sop=15&_osacat=0&_from=R40&_trksid=p2045573.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0.H0.Xsfp+10gb+cable.TRS0&_nkw=sfp+10gb+cable&_sacat=0

or

for $150 you can get forty eight 1GbE RJ45 POE ports and four 10GbE SFP+ ports:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Aruba-S2500-48T-4x10G-10-100-1000BASE-T-4x1000BASE-X-10GBASE-X-KMJ/232504836333?hash=item36225e40ed:g:l0cAAOSw-o1ZzUuR

 

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