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8TB Archive drives for storing my movies


rgreenpc
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Don't run these in a RAID.  "Bad things will happen". 

 

From what I've heard, they don't do well in RAID arrays, but that's not entirely surprising. They're meant for cold storage, not for RAID. 

 

 

I would argue that. I have several RAID's (in Synology devices) that are running these disks fine. I do however find there are throughput issues with them. These things were needed in a hurry and the archives are all I could get at the time, they are now scheduled for replacement over the next few months with other disks and these will be used as intended for cold storage

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WD Reds have been commonly specified as a great HD for RAID implementations.  Now I'm confused. 

So is that not true?

If so, then what are the best RAID drives?

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I would argue that. I have several RAID's (in Synology devices) that are running these disks fine. I do however find there are throughput issues with them. These things were needed in a hurry and the archives are all I could get at the time, they are now scheduled for replacement over the next few months with other disks and these will be used as intended for cold storage

 

Then you're on the lucky side. 

 

Though, throughput issues are not a surprise. 

 

WD Reds have been commonly specified as a great HD for RAID implementations.  Now I'm confused. 

So is that not true?

If so, then what are the best RAID drives?

 

WD Reds, Seagate NAS or other similar drives are still what's preferred for RAID arrays. 

 

Specifically because of the present of TLER, which the Seagate Archive (SMR) drives lack, IIRC. 

Additionally, because if the performacne drop, it is possible that a hardware RAID controller will drop them from the array, triggering a rebuild or performance degredation. 

 

So yes, you still want too use drives that are designed for NAS's in a NAS.

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WD Reds have been commonly specified as a great HD for RAID implementations.  Now I'm confused. 

So is that not true?

If so, then what are the best RAID drives?

8TB archive drives are Purple or AE not Red.

Reds are great for RAID.

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8TB archive drives are Purple or AE 

 

That's not technically correct. There really isn't a good equivalent, because no WD drive is using SMR (Shingled Magnetic Recording). 

 

Purple/Surveillance drives apparently have some optimization to support multiple writes at the same time but are not as good at rewrite (or so I've heard). 

 

But is closer to the WD Ae drives. As both are meant more for cold storage.  But the pricing is much lower for the Seagate Archive drives, have capacities other than 6TB, and most importantly, the performance profile is VERY different. 

 

 

Some of this may be semantics, but I prefer accuracy over approximation. 

 

 

Reds are great for RAID.

 

As above, WD Reds, or Seagate NAS are fantastic for RAID.  Both are meant to be in a RAID, where as the SMR drives are not. 

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That's not technically correct. There really isn't a good equivalent, because no WD drive is using SMR (Shingled Magnetic Recording). 

 

Purple/Surveillance drives apparently have some optimization to support multiple writes at the same time but are not as good at rewrite (or so I've heard). 

 

But is closer to the WD Ae drives. As both are meant more for cold storage.  But the pricing is much lower for the Seagate Archive drives, have capacities other than 6TB, and most importantly, the performance profile is VERY different. 

 

 

Some of this may be semantics, but I prefer accuracy over approximation. 

 

 

 

As above, WD Reds, or Seagate NAS are fantastic for RAID.  Both are meant to be in a RAID, where as the SMR drives are not. 

SMR is not required for a drive to be designed for archive use. WD Purple and AE drives do not use SMR, but are recommended for archival use and are not recommended for traditional RAID applications. As you have said, Seagate drives that use SMR should not be used for RAID. I am saying that 'archive' drives from WD are not recommended for RAID.

I also prefer accuracy, please tell me where I am technically not correct?

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