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8TB Archive drives for storing my movies


rgreenpc
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how do you like stablebit?

 

I keep leaning to a raid as I fear losing all my movies I spent eons ripping.

I'm one of two of the most biased people you could ask (seriously, check my signature :) ).

 

That said, I love it.

The software stores all of the pooled data in hidden folders on normal NTFS disks.  That means that not only could you add disk to the pool with existing data without having to wipe them... but if something goes wrong, you can easily access the files or even run data recovery. 

Some caveats to it, like it's not going to be as fast as a lot of RAID configurations, but it should be at least as fast as the underlying disks in the pool. With NAS or archive drives, the reads from the pool should saturate gigabit, or come close.  

And because i"m using the SSD Optimizer, new files DEFINITELY saturate gigabit. 

 

If you have any questions about it, you can ask me here, or on the support site. 

 

What product did you use to rip your DVD's?

 

Yeah, MakeMKV is very popular for that.  

 

Personally, I use DVD Fab. Though, it wasn't exactly cheap, while MakeMKV appears to be free. 

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I love Drivepool for this exact reason, worse case scenario just stick the drive into any machine that you have to hand and, bang, there are your files..

I've not hit performance issues personally, I don't really use SSD Optimiser as I don't have the space on the SSD's to spare, I have just had an 850Evo 250Gb land on my desk though so that might change this weekend lol

 

 

The software stores all of the pooled data in hidden folders on normal NTFS disks.  That means that not only could you add disk to the pool with existing data without having to wipe them... but if something goes wrong, you can easily access the files or even run data recovery. 

Some caveats to it, like it's not going to be as fast as a lot of RAID configurations, but it should be at least as fast as the underlying disks in the pool. With NAS or archive drives, the reads from the pool should saturate gigabit, or come close.  

And because i"m using the SSD Optimizer, new files DEFINITELY saturate gigabit. 

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[...] I've not hit performance issues personally [...]

 

I wasn't until I started using the Seagate Archive drives.  I did a good amount of tested before adding the first one to my pool.  As I said above, the write performance is horrible, and stalls out periodically.  As in, hits 0b/s for a second or t wo and then goes back. 

 

This is entirely because of the SMR tech.   And is most likely why RAID is killing the drives. 

 

And since I have 10 of these in my pool now, having the SSD optimizer is a requirement (though, seriously, you can pick up SSDs for so cheap now, that it's worth it.  The issue becomes slots for the SSDs. 

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I wasn't until I started using the Seagate Archive drives. I did a good amount of tested before adding the first one to my pool. As I said above, the write performance is horrible, and stalls out periodically. As in, hits 0b/s for a second or t wo and then goes back.

 

This is entirely because of the SMR tech. And is most likely why RAID is killing the drives.

 

And since I have 10 of these in my pool now, having the SSD optimizer is a requirement (though, seriously, you can pick up SSDs for so cheap now, that it's worth it. The issue becomes slots for the SSDs.

What redundancy do you use? Straight duplication?

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What redundancy do you use? Straight duplication?

Straight Duplication, yeah.  x2 for most everything, but x4 for certain, important files (such as Folder Redirection files). 

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I've got 2 spare holes in my Gen8 at the mo.

What sort of performance does SSD-O give, most of my files are >1gb and I only have about 50Gb of breathing space on the SSD thats in there at the mo, what would be nice is if you could program it so that files that are being read by my Plex VM are shadowed to the SSD or something, other than that dont think it'd help me much..

 

 

And since I have 10 of these in my pool now, having the SSD optimizer is a requirement (though, seriously, you can pick up SSDs for so cheap now, that it's worth it.  The issue becomes slots for the SSDs. 

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I've got 2 spare holes in my Gen8 at the mo.

What sort of performance does SSD-O give, most of my files are >1gb and I only have about 50Gb of breathing space on the SSD thats in there at the mo, what would be nice is if you could program it so that files that are being read by my Plex VM are shadowed to the SSD or something, other than that dont think it'd help me much..

 

Well, I may have misspoke.  :)

 

If you have a large amount of storage space and/or you add a lot of new content frequently, then you'd want to use the SSD Optimizer. 

 

The issue with those SMR drives is that if you're adding 20GB or more in a short period of time, it has issues because of the shingling.  It stalls until it's able to sort out the data.  And it does ths frequently. 

 

 

But if you're adding data infrequently, or a small amount of files, there shouldn't be an issue using the SMR drives directly, as the internal cache should be more than adequate to deal with that. 

 

 

So really, it depends on your use.

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All of my drives are WD Red's (Apart from the OS SSD and VM SSD that is) so might not run into the same issues as you...

 

 

Anyway, enough of the thread hijacking lol

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All of my drives are WD Red's (Apart from the OS SSD and VM SSD that is) so might not run into the same issues as you...

 

 

Anyway, enough of the thread hijacking lol

 

Ah, so you'd be fine. the WD Reds don't have any performance issues (in fact, they get great performance). 

 

For the SSD Optimizer, you can/will see speeds at the normal SSD speeds depending.  By "depending", I mean it depends on the source location (if it's not an SSD, the transfer will top out at the speed the source disk can manage), and if you're dong this over the network, then the max will be around 120MB/s, period (meaning not a huge speed increase).

 

The SSD Optimizer is definitely very "niche", but for things like the SMR drives, it fits that niche VERY well.

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