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aknotsdeath

Whole home network

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ShadowPeo

CAVEAT: I work mostly in institutional settings where we get significant discounts for the cabling. At home, as I am a registered cabler, so I do my own work, consequently I have no idea of costs for each exact run, as I just buy cable and jacks.

 

Personally, at home I have put in 2 data points in each bedroom, bar my own which has four data points. The "study" has the rack with all the data comms gear in it so I just use patch leads there.

 

Main Lounge has four data points, Secondary two data points.

 

I am putting more in currently, however, this is due to the design and size of our property which is spread out over several acres. The outbuildings where required are connected via OM3 fibre

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aknotsdeath

I paid for a guy to wire my house 18 months ago and asked for one Cat 6 in all living areas. He suggested 3 in each room (and more in my office). He also explained that the extra cost was minimal (10%). In nearly all locations I am using all 3 connections.

Oh wow really? What are you using them for? I know I have a lot of stuff that can connect but hmm.

 

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CAVEAT: I work mostly in institutional settings where we get significant discounts for the cabling. At home, as I am a registered cabler, so I do my own work, consequently I have no idea of costs for each exact run, as I just buy cable and jacks.

 

Personally, at home I have put in 2 data points in each bedroom, bar my own which has four data points. The "study" has the rack with all the data comms gear in it so I just use patch leads there.

 

Main Lounge has four data points, Secondary two data points.

 

I am putting more in currently, however, this is due to the design and size of our property which is spread out over several acres. The outbuildings where required are connected via OM3 fibre

So I am moving to 40 Acres. I can run a lot of the cable and such that is not an issue. However when the home is being built I want to make it easy to run cables later in life. Who knows what will happen on 5 years. I am working on a list of things right now that I am going to post so there is a little more guidelines for the post. I am trying to think of as much stuff as possible.

 

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Poppapete

Oh wow really? What are you using them for? I know I have a lot of stuff that can connect but hmm.

 

 

One connection to sony bravia TV ( we have 3) , one to an xbox (again 3), and finally to Foxtel box (we have 3).  Foxtel is the main cable provider in Australia.  Cablecards don't exist so the foxtel box can record and stream media from the cable company. So with 3 ethernet in each room we have none left for a security camera which means I should have had 4 outlets in each room.  Following the DOCS example I changed my cameras to wifi mode and they work just as well over the open mesh network and can be placed anywhere there is power rather than restricted to near the ethernet outlet. I have a 24 port switch and figured I needed about 15 when I bought it 18 months ago.  I have 1 empty port now. 

 

EDIT: I forgot about ethernet backhaul for any mesh wireless units.

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aknotsdeath

One connection to sony bravia TV ( we have 3) , one to an xbox (again 3), and finally to Foxtel box (we have 3). Foxtel is the main cable provider in Australia. Cablecards don't exist so the foxtel box can record and stream media from the cable company. So with 3 ethernet in each room we have none left for a security camera which means I should have had 4 outlets in each room. Following the DOCS example I changed my cameras to wifi mode and they work just as well over the open mesh network and can be placed anywhere there is power rather than restricted to near the ethernet outlet. I have a 24 port switch and figured I needed about 15 when I bought it 18 months ago. I have 1 empty port now.

Oh. Well on so 4 in main rooms and 8 in the theater area I think. I hate wireless but will have it as back up.

 

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Dalchi Frusche

To help future proof cable runs, make sure they use flex conduit so that upgraded lines can be ran with relative ease.

 

I currently have 2 drops in the living room behind the wall mounted TV and 2 more upstairs behind my office desk.  Each jack currently has a coax as well.  I plan on running at least one drop to each of the other bedrooms in the future when I can carve out some time and purchase the rest of the wallplates/jacks.  Monoprice has some great deals and prices on everything you might need and they give discounts for bulk purchasing.

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awraynor

It may have been mentioned above, but I didn't see it.

 

In a past life while in college I did HVAC, Refrigeration and Electrical work. If you are going to run conduit don't forget to pull an extra pulling line with 

the cables you will actually use. The pull line linked below will easily travel with your cables and be available if you chose to run more wiring

at a later time. It's pretty cheap and will save you a lot of frustration later.

 

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Klein-Tools-500-ft-Pulling-Line-56108/100660158;jsessionid=1A2E9D0CD8E8278142DB6DB87A1D5877

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ShadowPeo

 

 


So I am moving to 40 Acres. I can run a lot of the cable and such that is not an issue. However when the home is being built I want to make it easy to run cables later in life. Who knows what will happen on 5 years. I am working on a list of things right now that I am going to post so there is a little more guidelines for the post. I am trying to think of as much stuff as possible.


This kind of thing is different from many "home" installations, but a few of recommendations for this would be as follows

If at all possible do all excavation of cable trenches (or directional drilling etc) at once if financially possible all to a central distribution point as it should be. This will save a lot of money long term as well as time and hassle. Put in large conduits with multiple stringers I used to use 25 and 32mm conduit but now for underground runs use 50mm or larger as it is simply easier to pull through (plus I can add more later but that is really a moot point with Fibre, although it can be good if you have to replace the cable in the future.

Over large acreage if you want cover over a large area (for example of IOT kind of stuff in paddocks, think checking if a gate is open or closed remotely, remotely checking stock tank levels etc) you will need to put WAP's, Camera's etc. around the property, take this into account when doing the planning for conduit installation. PoE is your friend here especially if the runs are less than 100m. I have several active points where these kinds of things run to so I can use PoE. If using copper runs consider lightning suppression equipment just in case, these are reasonably inexpensive these days.

If you use fibre I suggest OS1/OS2 its cost is not much more that OM3/4 but will give better results long term. Active equipment is where the expense is in the single mode equipment

Where possible use pits and inspection points regularly as this helps massively in accessing the cable if needed.

Power and Data can run in the same trench (at least here in Aus) but there are minimum depths and separations ensure that things are safe.

 

Above all do everything to code, it makes it much easier in the long run. Pick one standard and stick to it. With the past few deployments of cable (and the currently planned ones) I have moved to sheilded Cat6A it costs about $10 more per point but gives me full 10 gig capability and sheilding. Warranty on that where I am is 20-25 years on parts an labor depending on the manafacturer chosen (must be installed by one of their certified cablers)

 

If at all possible )and if you get it professionally installed make sure its tested and certified utilising something such as a fluke before acceptence it gives you a known datapoint and ensures everything is good to start with (stops shonky work)

 

If you want to done "properly" and want to minimise costs, do the civil works yourself and get cabelers to simply do the pulls, the civil works is where most of the cost is anyway.

 

I am sure I will think of more, I actually started this post weeks ago but have not had time to complete and post it, so my thought train derailed (and there were no survivors).

 

Justin

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