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lapsio

Universal enterprise, reliable SSD brands? For RAID caching.

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lapsio

Hello

I'm quite new to enterprise grade hardware so I'd like to ask about brands that produce really high quality SSD drives as I don't know any of them.

I'm running DIY Linux server with 20TB software RAID6 attached to 128gb SSD cache. Unfortunately I thought Samsung PRO series is kind of semi-enterprise grade but it seems it was terrible misconception. Luckily this was my first SSD ever and I heard they're usually faulty so i didn't really trust it in first place and used cache in write-through mode but still it failed like bilion of times with I/O errors and required array remount at least once a week and cache zero-ing up to point I removed cache at all. I was experiencing exactly the same failures with EVO series but I don't have any of those issues with budget GoodRAM CX100 so it's rather not software related issue. All SSDs tested in the same setup.

So this time I'd like to get something that will work. It doesn't need to be speed daemon but preferably something faster than CX100, But priority is reliability. I thought about HP drives but they seem to be dedicated to HP servers? I'm not sure. What are respected brands of server grade SSDs? Probably I'd be interested in eMLC or even SLC. Compatible with SATA 6. I probably wouldn't like to pay more than 250$ for 128gb though.

Edited by lapsio

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schoondoggy

Purely a guess on my part, but if both Samsung Pro and EVO failed in your application there may be a compatibility issue between your software RAID cache and Samsung SSD controller chips. Can you give a bit more detail on your setup?

 

You don't have to go Enterprise to get reliable SSD's. I tend to recommend SSDs from companies that fab their own flash memory:

Intel-Micron-Crucial partnership

Toshiba-SanDisk partnership

Samsung

SK-Hynix

 

If speed is your main issue you may want to consider moving from a traditional SATA SSD to a NVMe type. You would need a motherboard that has the proper slot.

 

As for HP, they do not make SSD's. All of their drives and SSDs are made by other companies.

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lapsio

Sorry for no response I had really busy weeks recently :(

 

No, performance isn't my issue as long as SSD is faster than HDD which is not the case of GoodRAM CX100 (about 40MB/s rw, quite terrible for ssd)

I'm using btrfs filesystem and software btrfs RAID with dm-cache software cache. However failures occur not only during caching. I'm using EVO in laptop atm and i/o errors occur randomly during heavy i/o (like validating checksums of whole SSD or filesystem scrub (check)). Well despite being laptop it's actually kinda mobile workstation and workloads of all my machines are quite similar, I'm jumping between them during work everything is network synced, just hardware varies thus I'm having similar issues with those SSDs in one workstation and laptop whereas GoodRAM in another server is totally fine (in exactly the same software setup, the same caching mechanics, the same OS, everything the same on software side)

 

My motherboard doesn't support NVME it's P67 chipset (Sandy Bridge) quite old but I don't see any reason to upgrade as everything works awesome despite being consumer mobo used for workstation workloads. I think they might be overheating? But well that's kind of Samsung fault if they make SSDs without proper heatsinks. In workstation I could probably put in some additional fan but server and laptop - not really, there's no space in their cases for that. They're running at 60-70 deg

 

At some point after discussion in other threads I was pretty convinced to Intel S3610 but now I'm not sure anymore. They're quite expensive. I'm not sure if it's good investment. I could put that money into other hardware I need. Like 10gbe NIC which is similar price tbh...

Edited by lapsio

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schoondoggy

On your Samsung EVO SSD's have you updated them to the latest firmware? Samsung EVO had issues that were resolved with firmware updates.

 

The specs for the GoodRAM CX100 are much higher than 40MB/s:

http://www.goodram.com/product/ssd/goodram-ssd-cx100/

 

How are you testing the speed?

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lapsio

How are you testing the speed?

 

Well flushed ramcache, copied big file from ramdisk to drive. Measured time. Quite simple :D The same test on Samsung reports around 350MB/s

 

Just looked at "specs" haha yeah they're really imaginative. 560/500 on SSD for 30$. That's good one ;) Not that I'm hating this company GoodRAM is Polish company and I'm actually from Poland so I should kind of support them but still these are budget SSDs. Basically it was cheapest garbage SSD i could get and I bought it just because I needed some internal drive for server (i bought it without drives) and it was cheaper than cheapest 2.5" HDDs available in local store lol... I'd say it was really accidental choice I barely scrolled through specs. But well I'm quite satisfied with it at least it works unlike much more expensive "premium" drives I happened to get...

 

No i didn't upgrade firmware. Drives are not that old EVO is 1 year old PRO 1.5 year. I thought issues were already fixed then. Firmware upgrade on linux sounds tricky.

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alex1002

I would do array 1 for add caching. I have an lsi cachecaid setup with 4 SSDs in raid10 and drives of 2tb sas. And works well. In any case anything can fail even enterprise drives. By far samsung, intel micron are the best.

I would do array 1 for add caching. I have an lsi cachecaid setup with 4 SSDs in raid10 and drives of 2tb sas. And works well. In any case anything can fail even enterprise drives. By far samsung, intel micron are the best.
Sorry I meant raid 1 for the cache if possible

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Ikon-TNG
On 7/25/2016 at 12:07 AM, schoondoggy said:

If speed is your main issue you may want to consider moving from a traditional SATA SSD to a NVMe type. You would need a motherboard that has the proper slot.

 

I saw a board on Amazon that says it will adapt an M.2 NVMe SSD to a PCIe motherboard slot. Is this a bad idea? Garbage? It says it's for PCIe x4. 

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schoondoggy
 
I saw a board on Amazon that says it will adapt an M.2 NVMe SSD to a PCIe motherboard slot. Is this a bad idea? Garbage? It says it's for PCIe x4. 
I have used them. They work.

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Ikon-TNG

Cool. Maybe, with Christmas sales, I might be able to upgrade my main desktop's boot drive. Right now it has a Samsung 850 EVO connected to a SATA port (6Gb I think). Since this is a system my father built, I really doubt it has an M.2 slot. Maybe an M.2 and one of those PCIe boards would give the system new life.

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Trig0r

I've got some Kingston DC400's in my server at work, no issues as of yet..

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