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Luma technical discussion


dchay

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schoondoggy

The video did not help and maybe I haven't asked my question correctly.

 

The principle behind the mesh network is that the modules can talk to each other.  As soon as you hard wire every module haven't you effectively turned each device into an individual access point?  The mesh network is no longer used, right?  Devices will lock onto the strongest signal for the SSID they are after.  You probably won't switch from one module to another unless the signal gets weak enough and at that point you will just jump to the strongest module your device can find.

 

The beauty for the average homeowner who knows nothing about setting up wireless networks and ethernet cabling is that they can buy Eero or Luma and just drop module 2, 3, etc. in areas that they want to try and improve their WIFI.  They probably don't care that they have cut their bandwidth from 100Mb to 50Mb to 25Mb because they probably are probably watching Netflix on their TV while scrolling through Facebook on their phone.

 

So with all that said, ethernet backhaul (I am assuming is 2-way traffic) is essentially turning each module in the mesh network into individual access points.  Or, tell me why this isn't true.

 

Maybe my understanding is wrong on mesh wireless.. if so, someone please correct me.

 

My network previously consisted of two access points both on the same SSID. They were connected to each other via ethernet. With two units, I did not get full coverage throughout the whole house but when I was close enough, it worked fine. The problem however was there was no handoff so if I walked from one area to another, my connections would drop and connectivity would be stalled until my device regained a connection from the closer AP. And if I was in between the two APs, I sometimes found my device flipping between the two. Sometimes the weaker signal would win. Go figure. Ugh.

 

My hope with the Lumas was since the nodes communicate with each other, I will get seamless handoff and no loss of connections. That's the advantage I am looking for regardless of whether the Lumas are communicating with each other wirelessly or via wire.

 

My hope with the ethernet backhaul is:

 

1.) If my Internet connection is on Luma 1 and my wireless device is talking to Luma 2, then without ethernet backhaul, my traffic goes from wireless device to Luma 2 wirelessly and then from Luma 2 to Luma 1 wirelessly and then to the Internet. That's two trips through the air. With ethernet backhaul, I expect my traffic goes from wireless device to Luma 2 wirelessly, but then WIRED to Luma 1, then to the Internet. I avoid one wireless trip.

 

2.) The reason I don't get full coverage throughout the house with a single AP means I will have the same or similar issues with one Luma talking to another. Unless I bunch the Lumas up, I really don't get to spread them further apart to increase coverage. For example what if a stone wall, or metal piping, or a microwave, etc is between my two Luma nodes? By having the Lumas communicate via ethernet, I can get around this issue. Your wireless device talks to the closest/best Luma node and the Lumas communicate efficiently over ethernet to do seamless handoff as I move around the house.

To me Mesh is access points talking to each other to find the best path and handling hand offs as you move from room to room or AP to AP. To achieve this with traditional AP you need a Wireless Lan Controller. WLC are vendor specific and tend to be expensive. There are a growing number of AP vendors that have gone to cloud or software based WLC, but I digress,,,

DZ8 everything you are saying is valid, a properly working Mesh system should let you move freely through your house with no intervention on your part. Your device should be able to pick the best AP and the best radio, 2.4Ghz or 5Ghz. Wired Ethernet backhaul can address environment issues.

cskenney the AP of an Eero or Luma system are Mesh, they talk to each other. The communication can be wireless or wired (backhaul) Ethernet. Either way the devices are communicating with each other. There is a performance advantage to wired Ethernet backhaul. So why offer wireless Mesh? Some people can not or will not pull cable. I go back to my normal grounding point, the people that are in this forum are tech enthusiasts of differing degrees and are a small fraction of the target audience for these types of products. Making Eero, Luma, Plume and Amplifi Mesh or repeat wireless limits performance, but it removes the wiring objection for most consumers. For the average consumer wireless Mesh will be fast enough.

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Hi guys,   First off, I really enjoyed reading through the previous thread that way just locked. It was informative and your courtesy to one another is not like any online forum I've seen before. S

The R8000 is a great router and the hardware is pretty comparable to both eero and Luma. I run an R7000 with DD-WRT and I love it.   I can tell you that in the first few weeks of release, eero had a

As I said in the other thread, IMHO any wifi system that uses wifi as the backhaul is fatally flawed from the outset.  Don't waste your money on these things.

itGeeks

To me Mesh is access points talking to each other to find the best path and handling hand offs as you move from room to room or AP to AP. To achieve this with traditional AP you need a Wireless Lan Controller. WLC are vendor specific and tend to be expensive. There are a growing number of AP vendors that have gone to cloud or software based WLC, but I digress,,,

DZ8 everything you are saying is valid, a properly working Mesh system should let you move freely through your house with no intervention on your part. Your device should be able to pick the best AP and the best radio, 2.4Ghz or 5Ghz. Wired Ethernet backhaul can address environment issues.

cskenney the AP of an Eero or Luma system are Mesh, they talk to each other. The communication can be wireless or wired (backhaul) Ethernet. Either way the devices are communicating with each other. There is a performance advantage to wired Ethernet backhaul. So why offer wireless Mesh? Some people can not or will not pull cable. I go back to my normal grounding point, the people that are in this forum are tech enthusiasts of differing degrees and are a small fraction of the target audience for these types of products. Making Eero, Luma, Plume and Amplifi Mesh or repeat wireless limits performance, but it removes the wiring objection for most consumers. For the average consumer wireless Mesh will be fast enough.

Agreed. I think your answer is spot on and should address cskenney question better then my response even though we are saying the same thing in different ways ;)

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