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AmpliFi by Ubiquiti

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dchay

Not an expert, but it seems mesh is a no.

So I guess my next question is, based on their ability to implement these hybrid "mesh/access points" will it be a shortcoming that it's not pure mesh?

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awraynor

I'm waiting for the experts to chime in on this. In a typical home it may not be such a big deal? In a multi-thousand square foot facility

with multiple hand offs I assume it could be. 

 

I set up my first Eero on one end of the house, upstairs. Downstairs at the other end had decent signal. So a hub-repeater may be good enough. 

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schoondoggy

So I guess my next question is, based on their ability to implement these hybrid "mesh/access points" will it be a shortcoming that it's not pure mesh?

 

I'm waiting for the experts to chime in on this. In a typical home it may not be such a big deal? In a multi-thousand square foot facility

with multiple hand offs I assume it could be. 

 

I set up my first Eero on one end of the house, upstairs. Downstairs at the other end had decent signal. So a hub-repeater may be good enough. 

The current mesh systems and repeater based systems have limitations. Repeaters add latency and reduce bandwidth when compared to Wifi connection directly to the router. Current mesh systems have limited throughput due to talk between mesh points. I think both can address coverage issues. Candidly, I think many users are too focused on speed, faster is not always better. How many devices are on the WiFi? How many are on the wired network? Are they all accessing the internet or servers/devices on the local network? Coverage, throughput and latency are all things to consider. Look for bottlenecks, whiteboarding your network can help a lot. 

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whsbuss

@schoondoggy is correct. Speed is directly correlated to bandwidth and signal. I think we get confused with the term "mesh". Access points ethernet connected back to a hub can be considered mesh as long as they are on the same SSID network. The Eero and Luma are access points that can connect wired or wirelessly back to the hub. Each introduce (like all APs) some latency because they process traffic. The AmpliFi is a bit different. Their remotes are repeaters of traffic/signal. And I don't believe they can be cascade repeaters, as they need to communicate with the hub directly (EDIT - at least that's what it looks like until we can do some actual testing).

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itGeeks

Not an expert, but it seems mesh is a no.

This can all be very confusing but simply put, The 'mesh endpoints' as there calling them are considered "Mesh" as in wireless mesh but unlike Open Mesh, Eero, Luma and others the endpoints only communicate back to the base-station aka (hub) the mesh endpoints don't communicate with each other. Its still 'Mesh'. With the likes of Open Mesh, Eero, Luma and others you can build out a wireless network further because each device called (Nodes) can communicate with each other when using wireless mesh though you have to be very careful because the more 'hops' from the main unit (hub) you go the more penalty you put on speed. I am in full favor of the design decision Ubq has made because it keeps for the best performance only allowing 1 hop to the base-station/hub so speeds stay good. According to Ubq the base unit costing only 199.00 will cover 10,000 sqft so unless you wan wireless AC front to back top to bottem I would think most would be fine with the 200.00 base unit. Thats an incredible deal when you think about it, You get the base-station and 2 endpoints that according to reviews perform very well and is even considered the (Top performing) out of the 3 top runners. Not bad I say..

 

Have a look at the definition for "mesh" below- https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=what%20is%20wireless%20mesh%20topology

 

"wireless mesh network (WMN) is a communications network made up of radio nodes organized in a mesh topology. It is also a form of wireless ad hoc network. Wireless mesh networks often consist of mesh clients, mesh routers and gateways"

Edited by itGeeks

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dchay

Thanks for all the input. For me, I'm in a 3-story home (including basement) with roughly 2,600 sq. ft. My modem is in the basement along with my source router (currently eero) and a switch where my Synology Diskstation and my Circle with Disney connect. From there, a wire runs to the main floor living room to a media switch where my entertainment center connects about 5 devices (TV, smartthings, Dish receiver, etc.). Most are wired but some are wireless. My second eero is also here. From there a wire runs back downstairs to the basement to another media switch which feeds some game systems and Blu ray player. The third eero is upstairs in the master bedroom where it connects wirelessly.

 

Along with those things, there's a mix of 3 Chromecasts, a Fire TV, 2 laptops, along with 3 IP cameras (all wireless), an ecobee thermostat and Rainmachine irrigation box (both wireless), 6 tablets, 4 phones, and a partridge in a pear tree.

 

I have an extra, unused cable running from the modem up to the living room from when I had my previous Netgear router in a more central location in the living room to help with my signal. With eero, I simplified the layout by dropping out that cable and putting the gateway box back in the basement.

 

I'm not a heavy user of the Diskstation but will occasionally stream a video or two. Mostly, though, it powers my IP cams and is the source for shared files in the house.

 

At any given time, I can have a kid streaming Netflix in the living room, another playing Xbox in the basement, and two more on their tablets watching YouTube for kids. My wife is on her laptop doing the budget and I'm engaged in reading this forum. :-)

 

It's no "whiteboard" but hopefully the virtual tour helps give a sense of where I'm at.

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itGeeks

So I guess my next question is, based on their ability to implement these hybrid "mesh/access points" will it be a shortcoming that it's not pure mesh?

Unless your trying to cover more then 15 or 20,000 sqft I see no problem at all. The SD unit costing 199.00 will cover up to 10,000 sqft and the LR and HD units will cover up to 20,000 sqft, Of course mileage will vary best on building construction ect. but you get the idea.

 

Have a look at this review by Patrick Norton, He seems very excited about AmpliFi as am I https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cad06YwIbrA

Edited by itGeeks

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awraynor

The current mesh systems and repeater based systems have limitations. Repeaters add latency and reduce bandwidth when compared to Wifi connection directly to the router. Current mesh systems have limited throughput due to talk between mesh points. I think both can address coverage issues. Candidly, I think many users are too focused on speed, faster is not always better. How many devices are on the WiFi? How many are on the wired network? Are they all accessing the internet or servers/devices on the local network? Coverage, throughput and latency are all things to consider. Look for bottlenecks, whiteboarding your network can help a lot. 

 

Completely agree. Was looking or a simple to setup product with family filtering, decent speeds and the ability to handle the many devices on my network. I perceived that as the promise of Luma and that promise was not kept. That is why it is going back.

 

Unless Amplifi wows us, I suspect I'll just keep my Eero. My 30-day return period will be finished by the time it is released and reviewed, but I can still sell it on E-Bay and at least break even. For filtering it is apparent I'll have to add Circle or an alternative. 

 

Been a while since networking has been interesting, but boy what a difference a few months makes. 

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awraynor

Thanks for all the input. For me, I'm in a 3-story home (including basement) with roughly 2,600 sq. ft. My modem is in the basement along with my source router (currently eero) and a switch where my Synology Diskstation and my Circle with Disney connect. From there, a wire runs to the main floor living room to a media switch where my entertainment center connects about 5 devices (TV, smartthings, Dish receiver, etc.). Most are wired but some are wireless. My second eero is also here. From there a wire runs back downstairs to the basement to another media switch which feeds some game systems and Blu ray player. The third eero is upstairs in the master bedroom where it connects wirelessly.

 

Along with those things, there's a mix of 3 Chromecasts, a Fire TV, 2 laptops, along with 3 IP cameras (all wireless), an ecobee thermostat and Rainmachine irrigation box (both wireless), 6 tablets, 4 phones, and a partridge in a pear tree.

 

I have an extra, unused cable running from the modem up to the living room from when I had my previous Netgear router in a more central location in the living room to help with my signal. With eero, I simplified the layout by dropping out that cable and putting the gateway box back in the basement.

 

I'm not a heavy user of the Diskstation but will occasionally stream a video or two. Mostly, though, it powers my IP cams and is the source for shared files in the house.

 

At any given time, I can have a kid streaming Netflix in the living room, another playing Xbox in the basement, and two more on their tablets watching YouTube for kids. My wife is on her laptop doing the budget and I'm engaged in reading this forum. :-)

 

It's no "whiteboard" but hopefully the virtual tour helps give a sense of where I'm at.

 

Similar situation here. 2700 sq. ft. on two floors. Servers, QNAP, TV with FireTV, Amazon Tap, two desktops and 2 iPads in Playroom. This is on the top floor at one end of the house.

 

Next heavy use area is den with FireTV, two laptops and a desktop on the bottom floor at the other end of the house. Nothing wired. My house is over 30 years old and no ethernet has been ran. Boy doy I miss the house that was built in 2007 and was wired.

 

A scattering of FireTV's, AppleTV, Echos in between.

 

In my situation it's quite hard to centrally place the main "router". 

 

So far Eero seems to do well, but I'm always open to a more full-featured setup.

 

Still wondering if Open-Mesh isn't a better solution given all the promised features of Luma didn't ship.

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itGeeks

Similar situation here. 2700 sq. ft. on two floors. Servers, QNAP, TV with FireTV, Amazon Tap, two desktops and 2 iPads in Playroom. This is on the top floor at one end of the house.

 

Next heavy use area is den with FireTV, two laptops and a desktop on the bottom floor at the other end of the house. Nothing wired. My house is over 30 years old and no ethernet has been ran. Boy doy I miss the house that was built in 2007 and was wired.

 

A scattering of FireTV's, AppleTV, Echos in between.

 

In my situation it's quite hard to centrally place the main "router". 

 

So far Eero seems to do well, but I'm always open to a more full-featured setup.

 

Still wondering if Open-Mesh isn't a better solution given all the promised features of Luma didn't ship.

Thanks for sharing your layout. What are you and @dchay doing for gateway protection such as Antivirus, Malware, Spyware protection?

Edited by itGeeks

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