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Eero review.


psykix
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Interesting read. How many of you guys have 8 or more devices in one room streaming Netflix? ;)  

 

I think testing methods will need to change and testing versus the best router/wireless device will also need to go away.  It will need to be tested against other mesh products and extended products as well.  That's going to be difficult but that is who is buying this.  People frustrated with cheap extenders are looking to eero and luma.  I'm not so sure they are looking at Open Mesh or Ubiquiti type products as much as the enthusiast is.  

It was cool to see eero do some of the things it was supposed to do because it is a product that has neighbors. Good read. Good summary. The editor in me found a few things I didn't like but that is being nit picky!

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A solid mesh product is going to be key for me in the future. I've cut cable and surprised how easy it has been and

how accepting the wife is of it. Tried Sling and it was so-so, more so than so.

 

Next was PlayStation Vue which has been a much better experience overall. All of this of course needing a solid

network. Streaming TV's, notebook, phones and tablets need solid bandwidth. Vue didn't suffer as much when I

was uploading to cloud storage as did Sling, but it still is noticeable. 

 

In my house it wouldn't be unrealistic to have 4 streaming devices at the same time and when they get friends over

well we will see. 

 

With the big companies getting in on this these smaller companies need to iterate to stay relevant. In that article

saw the reference to the D-Link "DKT-891 Unified Home Networking Kit"

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Interesting read. How many of you guys have 8 or more devices in one room streaming Netflix? ;)

 

I think testing methods will need to change and testing versus the best router/wireless device will also need to go away.  It will need to be tested against other mesh products and extended products as well.  That's going to be difficult but that is who is buying this.  People frustrated with cheap extenders are looking to eero and luma.  I'm not so sure they are looking at Open Mesh or Ubiquiti type products as much as the enthusiast is.  

It was cool to see eero do some of the things it was supposed to do because it is a product that has neighbors. Good read. Good summary. The editor in me found a few things I didn't like but that is being nit picky!

 

I think Eero may have its place in the larger home --but I'm really wondering if people who are frustrated don't just go Airport Extreme at the moment.  For a geek enthusiast, they don't have as many twiddly bits --but they have a reputation for very decent range and performance without having to fool with them much.

 

With the Eero you're at a price point that goes above an Airport Extreme, so if you don't have too much square footage, an Eero will lose to that.  On the other hand, if you have a larger living space, the Eero may appeal, especially as the product that tried this first (xClaim, Ruckus' home division) fell on its face miserably by being not-ready for prime time with pre-beta level software and lousy technical support.

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Noooooooooooo. The whole point is those that have extenders. Even AE with Airport Express as extenders have major issues.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk

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Noooooooooooo. The whole point is those that have extenders. Even AE with Airport Express as extenders have major issues.

 

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk

 

Ah, sorry, my apologies.

 

I'm not a fan of extenders, due to their cutting down bandwidth.  I have only one in the house, it's a 2 x 2 AC1300 bridge with 4-port gigabit switch from Buffalo.

 

That works well, but I'd rather not add too many.  I'd much rather someone come out with a working version of xClaim Wireless' product, where you plug all the APs in, then use a smartphone-based app to walk through steps and set them up, where each unit is a real AP.  That way, someone could have the wiring done in their house, but set up the APs themselves in a user-friendly manner.

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Ah, sorry, my apologies.

 

I'm not a fan of extenders, due to their cutting down bandwidth.  I have only one in the house, it's a 2 x 2 AC1300 bridge with 4-port gigabit switch from Buffalo.

 

That works well, but I'd rather not add too many.  I'd much rather someone come out with a working version of xClaim Wireless' product, where you plug all the APs in, then use a smartphone-based app to walk through steps and set them up, where each unit is a real AP.  That way, someone could have the wiring done in their house, but set up the APs themselves in a user-friendly manner.

 

Nobody on this forum is either.  Yet, go to the store and the shelves are full of plug in extenders and the like. All ready to take the uninformed's money away from them and halve their bandwidth.  I agree with the Airport Extreme though.  It's a good device and has good range but if you need to extend it you will still get slower speeds for costly additions.

 

You just described eero in your second paragraph.

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Nobody on this forum is either.  Yet, go to the store and the shelves are full of plug in extenders and the like. All ready to take the uninformed's money away from them and halve their bandwidth.  I agree with the Airport Extreme though.  It's a good device and has good range but if you need to extend it you will still get slower speeds for costly additions.

 

You just described eero in your second paragraph.

 

From what you're telling me though, the eero does an extension.  The xClaim product is a set of managed wireless APs.  It sounds like the intended function is similar, but the APs are connected direct in through wiring --which would be what I see as the better option

 

Let me be clear, I think the xClaim product isn't ready for prime-time.  The home division of Ruckus released them very prematurely, with half-baked software; if that ever comes up to par, they might really be something as the hardware (which is composed of Ruckus ZoneFlex access points) is pretty good.

 

And of course, most of us here have enthusiast expectations of a product, which does raise the bar somewhat higher.  If eero is (and it sounds like it is) an easy setup to keep going in your parent's house and provides the basic bandwidth that they need without having to wire, that would easily be a plus.

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The Eero uses a separate wifi channel to talk to each other, so doesn't have the same bandwidth overhead as extenders do.

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The Eero uses a separate wifi channel to talk to each other, so doesn't have the same bandwidth overhead as extenders do.

 

Yes, it does.  It is supposed to use a separate radio to backhaul with so not to reduce overall bandwidth.  As far as I know that feature has not been turned on yet.  I need to do a test again real quick.  I have a bandwidth app loaded on a PC and can test each AP in my house. I have two hooked up on Ethernet and one is just hooked up to power so it's meshing in to the others.

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