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Dell's Newcomer -- The PowerEdge T130


LoneWolf
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It looks to be positioned to aim at the HP Proliant ML30.  I figured I'd post some links and start a discussion.

 

Dell's sales page:

http://www.dell.com/us/business/p/poweredge-t130/pd

 

Dell's spec sheed (PDF):

http://i.dell.com/sites/doccontent/shared-content/data-sheets/en/Documents/Dell_PowerEdge_T130_SpecSheet_final.pdf

 

 

 

DELL%20PowerEdge%20T130.jpg

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This looks awfully expensive from the initial view.  64GB RAM with no OS, entry level Xeon processor, and no hard drives is $1700.  For another $700 you could get the system Paul Braren is promoting with 128GB RAM.

 

Nice looking box however.

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I managed to get the price down some by taking the initial config, lowering the hard drive that comes with from 1TB to 500GB (I couldn't get no drive, but this cut the storage price in half), lowering the base RAM to 4GB (most of us are going to buy aftermarket RAM), but upgrading from the iDRAC Basic to the iDRAC Express (as most of us would want this).

 

While you can't find them there yet (too new), the other possibility to get the price down is through the Dell Outlet, by getting factory-recertified gear.  This lowers the price, and if you find a coupon code on the Dell Outlet Twitter feed, you might drop it further.  It does mean that you can't build-to-order and you'll be getting exactly what's spec-ed, no more/no less, but you'll get the warranty the unit came with new.  I've ordered a lot of gear this way for people, and my satisfaction rate has been quite high.

 

I agree, the ML30 is stiff competition, but the T130 is an interesting box.

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I just ordered one of these for my parish to replace an N40L that I set up 4 years ago.  Base Xeon processor (E3-1220 iirc), 8GB RAM, 500GB HDD (I have plenty of 1-2TB Reds lying around) and not much else.  Haven't seen it yet, but I'll let you guys know what I think when I get it.  Isn't going to be doing much, Server 2012R2 Essentials for around 10 computers, mostly for the file storage and backups.  Probably could have gotten by with lower specs, but I'd rather have the power and not use it than not have the power.  I'm thinking WSUS may be useful in the future, so that why I wanted a little extra power, in case I ended up adding that.

 

I went with the T130 over a T20 largely because it was a newer platform and so I felt that the hardware wouldn't be as close to EOL.  All of Dell's other options that I checked (T20, T110) seem to have fairly old processors, so I felt that even at a low model I should get pretty good performance with the newer Xeon.  I've shied away from HP because I don't want to try and make sense of their policies around firmware and driver updates.  That and every other computer in the office is Dell anyways, so it made some sense to me to get the new server from Dell as well since I found an option I liked.

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The T20 is basically an Optiplex relabeled as a server.  There's a couple minor changes, but even the case design is Optiplex tower with a different front fascia.  So I'm pretty much over that model, because I'd want more.  There are also a lot of Dell Enterprise parts that would not be supported, even if you put them in (e.g., PERC RAID controllers).

 

The T130 will probably replace the long-lived T110 II, which has been a decent server whose design went without an update for too long.  Also, neither the T20 or the T110 II supported iDRAC options; you had to move one more step up to the T3xx line.  The T130 remedies that.

 

As for HP, the policy really isn't that odd --if you're in warranty, you get firmware.  This is a policy I do not like in the world of home servers and non-profit organizations (or K-12 education), but in the enterprise, an out-of-warranty server is living on borrowed time.  In one way, yep, this benefits HP by making sure clients buy warranties, but in another way, it benefits businesses by sometimes forcing them to do what they should have done all along.  Also note that the ML30 Gen9 server now actually comes with a 3-1-1 warranty (3 years parts), likely in response to some of this.

 

Dell's servers above a certain grade are usually a 3, 4, or 5-year warranty package with selectable response time on the support.  Only the low-end gear tends to eliminate this.  They do offer the firmware free, but every time I've seen a client's Dell server beyond warranty, it's a client who has generally been stingy, has advised to upgrade (and hasn't), and is living on borrowed time until the day their RAID array fails spectacularly.

 

I like both HP and Dell servers for the most part.  I use Dell at work; I've generally used HP at home just because until recently, Dell's entry-level stripped out most of the management features, whereas HP offered several of the key ones (iLO4) from the best all the way down to the least of their servers.

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