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HSS 296 eero vs luma vs open mesh vs ubiquiti


Dave

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Unfortunately the demand for Eero on eBay is weak at best. Even the singles aren't moving. They went back to Eero today, so I'm not out any money.

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Personally I still view the newer ubiquiti products are better.  The price comparison really doesn't matter because most will not get the cheaper early bird price.   Eero is $499 for a 3 router setu

Not disagreeing with you there but I think there are 2 markets for wifi systems.  The simple to setup like eero and the professional/enterprise systems like ubiquiti.   I think a very key point for

WiFi market extremes: Home: Cheap WiFi Router or WiFi built into ISP's modem. Enterprise: Cisco or Aruba WAP's and controllers, with firewalls from Palo Alto, Cisco, CheckPoint, Juniper, Anecdotal in

itGeeks

Unfortunately the demand for Eero on eBay is weak at best. Even the singles aren't moving. They went back to Eero today, so I'm not out any money.

I am sorry to here that, I would of thought for sure you could of made a little profit from them, Well as you said at least you don't lose any money. What was the problem with Eero?

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I got caught in the pre-order hype before learning of Open-Mesh. By the time Eeros arrived, I had a reliable, more capable setup negating the need for Eero.

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itGeeks

I got caught in the pre-order hype before learning of Open-Mesh. By the time Eeros arrived, I had a reliable, more capable setup negating the need for Eero.

Thanks for the update & I am glad Open-Mesh is working well for you as it is for me as well. I am still excited to get my hands on Luma and put that threw the paces as it seems like an exciting product, If it works well I will replace my Sophos router & Open-Mesh to simplify my setup. I am also looking for a solution for my daughter that will keep the kids safe online. If Luma does not deliver on its promise then I will probably use Open-Mesh with Circle for the filtering and maybe and or the new Synology router http://www.amazon.com/Synology-RT1900ac-Router/dp/B01BJOF316/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1458996107&sr=8-1&keywords=synology+router+rt1900ac

 

There are many diffrent ways I could go depending how Luma works out.

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LoneWolf

For that you get far more control over the system and since its all Ubiquiti the non standard poe doesn't matter.  Never saw the merit in this point imo.  Why would you ever want to use a non ubquiiti switch/router with their AP's.  I would personally always go with the same equipment manufacturer because you can really only be sure they test their products together.

 

I have an easy answer to that.  There are other switches or routers I like better, and I don't have to use Ubiquiti switches or routers to get what I want when using their access points.

 

I'm using a WatchGuard T 30-W as my router/firewall.  I have the wireless turned off because while it's the latest standards, they have one weakness with integrated wireless, and that's that they aren't simultaneous dual frequency, which is a non-starter for me.  I'm okay with that because I'm certified on the product, got it at a discount, and the firewall and UTM are very powerful and useful.

 

I'm using a Cisco SG300-10MPP as my main switch.  Solid, easy to manage, PoE, and fanless.  Very happy with that.

 

If I run out of ports in the main area, I have a Dell PowerConnect 2816 I'll be adding.  Once again fanless, and can be converted to managed easily.  Mint condition, and didn't cost me anything, and it's solid hardware.

 

My secondary switch is a Netgear GS110TP.  802.3af PoE, managed, and can fiber-link to the Cisco.  And my new Ubiquiti UAP-AC-Pro works perfectly with it.  Once again, fanless, so all three switches add no noise to my environment.

 

Now if I was corporate, I'd buy all matching switches.  However, though I might go Ubiquiti with access points depending on the situation, I don't need their switches for the APs to work, and that's actually a plus, because if I did, there are other switches I might want first and then it might affect my choice against them.  Cisco/Meraki for example has some very nice gear in that market.

 

We use the UB Toughswitches in some scenarios because they have useful applications.

 

Has anyone done a thorough Ubiquity vs. Open-Mesh comparison with the new AC products?  Do they have support for VLAN's to segregate traffic into different sub nets?  I don't recall much discussion of this in the podcast.

Both seem better suited for either enthusiasts or small businesses that need coverage over a large area, but don't have the budget for a large scale enterprise solution and an IT department.  

 

I previously tried to create seamless wireless network coverage using Netgear business wireless access points at my parent's business, but there was no simple way to coordinate the access points.  Also I had to use different SSID's because some devices had trouble switching between access points.

 

I can't speak for what I haven't used (OpenMesh), other than that their WAPs are a whitebox piece of hardware (nothing wrong with that at all) that are used by several companies; this includes WatchGuard.  The difference is in the firmware; companies write their own.  We have used the Watchguard AP-300, which should be the same AP as the OpenMesh AC model, and on Watchguard's firmware, they have been good so far.

 

I haven't done too many fancy tweaks to my Ubiquiti UAP-AC-PRO; I just set it up this weekend.  I know it supports VLANs, but I haven't had a chance to tweak that yet, as I have to set up VLANs on my firewall and switches before I do that, and I didn't have time (or the desire to interrupt the wife's need to use her computer to do report cards...in the interest of not destressing a teacher).  I bought it after a lot of research because it's 3 x 3 802.11n and 3 x 3 802.11ac, but also because its PoE is 802.3af standard; the other two Ubiquiti APs (AC-Lite, AC-LR) require injectors (all three come with them).

 

So far, performance has been very good with the UAP-AC-PRO.  I was deciding whether I'd need a second in the future prior to ordering, and for my house, I doubt it.  Early days to be sure, but setup of a VM to run the Unifi controller software was harder than running the controller software and configuring the AP, and that's in part because I took the slightly harder road of using a Linux VM (which is not my best IT strength) to do the controller instead of Windows.  Actually getting connected to the WAP ifom my laptop is faster than any other AP I've seen.  I'm going to want to see how things go again once I do the VLANs and add a Guest SSID to go through them, but at $140 plus shipping, so far it seems like a good value.

Edited by LoneWolf
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rmsumida

WiFi market extremes: Home: Cheap WiFi Router or WiFi built into ISP's modem. Enterprise: Cisco or Aruba WAP's and controllers, with firewalls from Palo Alto, Cisco, CheckPoint, Juniper,

Anecdotal information: There are 11 houses on my cul-de-sac. Through neighborhood events I have gotten to know all of our neighbors. I feel comfortable in saying they all have bad WiFi coverage in their homes and they do not know there is anything better than their cheap and/or poorly placed WiFi router. Only two of these neighbors would be comfortable running Ethernet cable and placing WAP's. I am the only one in my neighborhood comfortable running a UTM or advanced firewall or router. I believe at least half of these neighbors would be interested in something like Luma or Eero, if they can deliver on their promises. I think average consumers would pay a premium for ease of setup and use, with premium security and great WiFi coverage.

Agreed and you can add another category of consumers that would pay for this.  The technical professions that don't want to deal with setting up and maintaining a home wifi system.  At work I spend my days thinking about network architecture / design / engineering / implementation, etc.  When it comes to my home network I'll pay the premium for simplicity and easy setup every time.  I guess it comes down to opportunity cost for me... give me that time back so I can spend it on other things I'd rather do.

 

 

Personally I still view the newer ubiquiti products are better.  The price comparison really doesn't matter because most will not get the cheaper early bird price.

 

Eero is $499 for a 3 router setup

Ubiquiti is $482 for 3 x AC-LR AP's and an EdgeRouter 5 port router/switch.  (current prices from amazon)

 

For that you get far more control over the system and since its all Ubiquiti the non standard poe doesn't matter.  Never saw the merit in this point imo.  Why would you ever want to use a non ubquiiti switch/router with their AP's.  I would personally always go with the same equipment manufacturer because you can really only be sure they test their products together.

While you have a point that the system would usually be all Ubiquiti I would still have to disagree with you.  From a network architecture/design perspective you always avoid proprietary solutions when there is an open standard available that meets your requirements.  You don't want to be locked into a vendor when the time comes to upgrade or scale your network.  Yes, interoperability is a risk but I'd take that risk over getting locked into a vendor, especially when it comes to a mature standard like PoE.  

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